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January 11, 1924 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1924-01-11

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'OLDE

ICY

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ASSOCIATED
LEASED WIRE
ME MBE:
WESTERN CON
EDITORIAL ASS

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XXXIV. No. 78

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE

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4

GOVERNMENT DISPATCIIES FORCE
OF 2000 FEDERAL TROOPS
TO VICINITY
REGULARS IN BATTLE
IN TEHUACAN DISTRICT
Revolutionary Forces Suffer Defeat In
Attack Following Trap
Failure
Mexico City, Jam. 10-(By A.P.)-
The capture this. torning of Pachuca j
capital of and the most important min-
ing town in the nearby state of Hid-
alzo, by rebel folces under Generals'
Marcial Gazazos, Nicolas Slores And
Otlio Villezas, was conurued at noon
today by the war departmt.
In making the 6iakoifniitt thei]
hope was expressed by war dni-
ment officials that the rebels would
attempt to hold the city, which is 55

Comedy Club Production Is-
Labelled "Truly Significant"
The Comedy club has done some-, ments was surprisingly deft.
thing which should be, in Mertonesque I "At the Hawk's Well" was the chef
labguage, "truly significant". The d'oevre -of the evening told of the,
performance last evening was inter- eternal search for immortality as sYm-
esting from 'two standpoints. This is bolized by the Waters of a hidden
tbe first time that either of these two, spring. The Old Man who has wast-
plays have been produced in America 'ed his life in the quest falls asleep at
tn aking the initiative in doing this. the crucial moment, while the Young
the Comedy club is truly assuming the Man, full of the arrogant confildence of
spirit of artistip adventure. The sec- youth, is distracted by the physical
ond point of interest wasin the ex- andsensual beauty of the Guardian
cellence of the production itself. of, the Well.
Molnar's "The Key", a one act bit I Throughout the production there wa,
i one in his "Vanity Pair" manner con- a remarkable unity of feeling. The
sisted in a sprightly dialogue, the Im- settings and costumes by Robert Hen-
portance of which lay in its charac- derson, his interpretation of the role
erietic sophisticated overtones rather of the Young Man and the dancing
than in its oyert implications. Natur- by Marion Miller were perhaps the
ally a play of this type challenges the outstanding features of an unusually
actors' ingenuity; the opportunities for; well-balanced and artistic piece.
the more ordinary dramatic technique The music in the -ultra-modern
being so limited. The leading part as manner by Edmond Dulac contributed
it was interpreted by Miss Proudfoot to the rather tenuous Celtic mood. -
never became monotonous and in mo- J.W.C.

APPROVAL PARTLY
GIVEN TO9 MELON
MEASURE BYHOUSE!

BAND ENTERTAINS
LRGE ASSEMBLY
AT YEAR'S BOUNCE

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5. C, A. CAMPAIGN
TO BE CONTINUED

'RTRUCVESIRD SEPULCHRE

the rbelI

! Extension Is Made In Hope Of Reach.
S ng $5.000 Mark; iore aan $3560
Is Thus Far Obtained
PARTICIPANTS ARE URGED. TO
INCREAsE EFFORTS TODAY
Campaigning for the Student
Christian association's financial drive
will continue through today and prob-
ably tomorrbw. Although all rec-
ords for the first two days of the
-pat association's financial. drives
Were broken when $2,176.39 was sub-
scribed by 12 o'clock Wednesday
night, and more than $3,500 obtained
by 12 o'clock 'last night, the exten-
ion .of the campaign was made in
tie anticipation of reaching the
$,-000 mark.
Teamsix, captained by Donald
Williams,'26L, was announced to he

Andrew Almamn, in
neril forces in front
engagedIn a fdrce.
rebeles who fre bald
ed by General For-
and General Casato
CIUB MEETiNS

Dtrt isbt-11, '25L and team five, cap-
-aIned:by Renas Lickert, '26, as sec-
ndVnd third. The two men that are
leading in the campaign are B. J.-
1qcWjKebey, '27 with $58 and A. B.'
Thomas, '251 with $30. Daniel Mill-
er,' '25 is the lieutenant of the lead-.
Ing sub-team.
A receiving committee was appoint-
ed for the campaign and includes
the following students: Harold .Jacox,.
'26, chairman, Charles Stevens, '26,
Arden Kirshner, '25, Edwin Davis,
'26, Leslie Meyers, '26, and Elmer
Lauthner, '26. Fraternities were so-
licited by students who were sent
to the fraternity houses during the
meal hours to deliver short talks in
regard to the drive. A meeting was al-
so held at 5:30 o'clock, yesterday af-
ternoon in Lane hall for all students

Shrine Stands Revealed Most Beaut-
fal of Those Surrounding Phar.
oh's Sarcophagus
400 ROSETTES TAKEN FROM
TUTANKHAMEN'S CANOPIC
Luxor, Egypt; Jan. 10. -(ByAP)-
The anticipation of the excavatos
that another cache of treasue, n'ot4b-
ly jewelry, might be discosede btWeen
the second and third shrin t Tut
ankhamen's canopic sepulchre hav*
not be realized. After oneF of tle
most arduous pieces of work he had
undertaken since the discovery ofthej
tomnb, Howard Carter this afternkon
succeeded 'in dismantling the front
section of the lid of the second shrino
thereby revealing a greater paft of
the third casket and affording a
glimpae into the space between
second and third shrine. ;
It is understood nothing wag
found in this space. -On the other
'hand, the thirdshrine stahdg reveal-
ed as one of the most beautffuI of
those surrounding the phahaoh'I
sarcophagus. It is brightly gilded
and like the rest abundantly nscrib-
ed with hieroglyphics, with golden
ornamenttion running 'around the
cornice, and a roof of brilliant,-shin-
ing red. The inside of the roofof the
second casket is painted with figur-es
of the Gods, representations of the
protective device ;of Hawk's wings
out spread and the cartousces of the}
kings.
The front section of the roof was
deposited in the anti-chamber of the'
tomb, and the other section will be
attacked tomorrow. During . -the
course of the morning the remaining
portion of the linenpall swathed in
cotton \voll was removed together
with the more than 400 gold rosettes
with which the pall was bespangled.-
NEW BRITISH PARIAMENT1,
COMPLETES FORMAL RITES '

COMNi1TTEE MEMBERS REPORT NO
OPPOSITION iN EX ECUTIVE
SESSIONS
R EVENUE BILL STUDY
IS PUSHED FORWARD
Soldier Bloc To Fight For Resolution
Pledging Republicans To
Pass Bonus Act
VWashington, Jan. 10.-(By AP)-
Tentative apporval was given today
mttee to the provision in theby the h
by the house ways and means com-
mittee to the provision in the Mellon
tax bill for the creation of a board
of tax appeals-one of the important
proposals-in the treasury draft.
ICommittee members reported that
at their executive sessions practical-
iy+ no opposition had been voiced to
the treasury recommendation and
Democrats and Republicans joined in
t predictions that establishment of the
board would be recommended.
The committee turned from its con-
sideration of administrative features
of the tax bill long enough to ordar
a favorable report of chairman
Green's resolution proposing a con-
stitutional amendment which would
put au end . to isuance of taxe free
securities. Such a proposal receiv-
ed house ap proval in the last con-
gress but failed of action in the sen-
ate.
The committee pressed forward
With' its study of the revenue bill
with the realization that its program
undoubtedly would be mapped out at
the conference tonight of house re-
pubhlicans,. called at the request of
war veterans Who have ben demand-
ing action in the soldier's bonus.
The soldier -bloc went into the con-
publicans 6f 'the house to- passage of
erence per pared to fight for the'
adoptionaf6f aresolution pledging Re-
a bonus- bill at this session of con-
gress-a poposal which hepiesent-
ative 'Longworth, the Republican
leader hada ,nnounced he, would op-i
pose.

TALENTED SOLOISTS PLEASE
AUDIENCE WITH CLEVER
PERFORMANCES
PROCEEDS OF EVENING
TO PAY YEAR'S DEBTS
Concert Scores lilt With Capable
Playing and Popular
Selections
Playing with spirit and animation
the Varsity Band presented its Win-
ter Bounce at Hill Auditorium last
night, assisted by a number of spe-
I cial acts which were interspersed in
the well-filled program. The attend-
ance at the Concert proved to be more
than satisfactory and assurance was
practically given that the proceeds}
will. be more than sufficient to pay off;
the debt outstanding from the Wis-
consin trip and in add'tion have af
sum for the rt- 'ing exnses of the
'Band.
The Hawaiian music of the guitars
of Tang and Travares assisted by H.
B. Wagner, '20, so oists with the 192e
Union Opera, "Top O' The Morning,"
were easily the hit of the evening, to-
gether with the -Stanchfield brothers
in a haphazard so rtof skit entitled
"What They Ain't, Isn't". Arnold
ierndt, S. of M., was the other indi-
v'icual performer of the program with
a cornet solo, "Culver Polka", by
Steinhauser.
Ranging from the classic selections
of "Aida", "the Men of the Maize and
Blue" and the "Bum Army", to selec-
tions of a more popular nature the
Band displayed ability under the di-E
rection of Wilfred Wilson.
"The Whistler and His Dog", by
Pryor, "The Ghost Dance," by Salis-
burg and the March "Hail Michigan,"
by Fixel proved to be the most popu-
lar numbers of the Band's presenta-
tion. The "Victors", played as only'
the Varsity Band can play it, closed
the program.
PALTINATELYINCH LAW
VICIMZE EPRATISTS

E.AL Y FIJIDAMAIEII
',GIRLS' LEGUE REUSE

ATHLETIC BOOKS MAY BE "
USED FOR GAME TONIGHT 1
For the first time in three I
years student athletic coupon [
books will admit the owners to {
Michigan home basketball games
with the opening game at 8 {
F o'clock tonight, in Yost Field I
{ house, between Michigan and J
the Michigan Aggies. Accomo- [
dations are available for to-
nigtht's game for 8,000 persons. I
( Tickets for those who do not
Ihold student athletic books are {
on sale at the Athletic office {
for $1.
BAKST TO SPEAK
TOMORROW NIGHT
Rene Talamon WI Interpret Lecture
by Famous Artist; Oratorical
Course Number
PAINTINGS NOW ON DISPLAY
IN GALLERY OF ALUMNI HALL
Leon Bakst, artist, illustrator, and
said to be the world's greatest au-
thority on costume and dress, will die-
liver an illustrated lecture at 8 o'clock
tomorrow night in Hill auditorium
Mr. Bakst will talk on "Costumes and
Personalities", and will attempt, it
is said, to draw some conclusions as
to the inter-relation of the two.
Due to Mr. Bakst's strong French
accent, and the realization that this
might hinder the effectiveness of the
lecture, the Oratorical association
which is- sponsoring Mr. Bakst's ap-
pearance, has arranged with Prof
Rene Talamon of the French depart-
'ent to interpret the talk. This will
not be Professor Talamon's first ex-,
perience as interpreter, for during the
war he was employed a great deal in
this work by the French government
and later he acted as official Interpre-
ter for the conference for the limita-
tion of armaments held in Washin-
ton.
The lecturer Is noted not only for his
work as a designer of costumes, forG
he has achieved distinction both as a
painter of portraits and as designer
of stage settings. In this last capacity
he has done work for the Ballet Russe
and for the' Operas of Gabriel DAn-
nunzio, one of which is to be present-
ed in the United States thls .season
A number of his paintings are now on
exhibition in the West gallery of Alum-
niohall.
H MA:a rri n,(t brh~~'

EDUCATION PROMOTI(
IS PURPOSE OF ASSEME
Burton, Wickenden to Address I
gates; Five Plans to Be Submi
ed During First Day
Deans and presidenrs of 166 Ai
ican and Canadian engineerng
stitutions have received invitat
to attend a meeting of Deans and
ministrative officers of enginee
schools and colleges which will
held here January 25 and 26.
meeting is the first to be held
this division of the society for
motion of engineering education.
At a meeting of the'society at I
university in 1921 such a dlvi
was proposed, the next year a
meeting at the University of Ill,
the division was authorized- a
the meeting in Ithaca last year, a
vitation of the University of Mi
gan to hold the first session in
-Arbor was accepted. Prof. A
Lovell of the electrical enginee
department was appointed chair
of the entertainment committee
Dean M. E. Cooley of the englnee
department.
-To Discuss Three Subjects
Three subjects are expected to
ccive the consideration of the
vention. The afternoon of the I
day will be taken up with a
cussion of the "Length and Con
of the Curriculum." At thi ime
plans will be laid before the mee
Dean Raymond, of Iow, Dean Htt
of Harvard, Dean ooley, of MichiI
Dean Pegram, of Columbia, and P
dent Humphreys, of Stevens, will
fer plans proposed by - their reep
lve institutions. At the sessior
the morning of the second day
the convention is. to .considet
plaoe .of "Research in the Undergi
uite Engineering Schoo9" 'and the
.laton of the "Enginering SchoI
the, Industriee",President Richards
Princeton and W. M. Alexander -
address the assembly on these
topics..-,
It is thought that W. E. Wicke
who is investigating American- enl
sering colleges for the Carnegie
stitute, will speak on his plans for
investigation during the afternoor
the second day.
Burton To Speak
Visiting delegates will be give
dinner by the University Satur
night in the Union. At this t
President Marion L. Burton, will
dress the assembled guests.
During their stay at the Univer
those in attendance at the meet
will be at the Union, where all
comodations have been reserved
them. Some delegates will be he
guests of members of the engineer
faculty.
BEGGASWAR 9M CITY
SINCE CLOSE rt oF
Leipzig, Jan. 10-(By A.P.)-l
gars, unknown here before the ;
have been overrunling the city
winter, and causing the police m
concern,
Investigators have estimated t
each house in Leipzig was visited
an average by 12 beggars 9ach c
many of them children. All those
asked for something to eat were
actually hungary, however. The
lice discovered several sets of i
and women who begged all - day
meat and bread, and sold the 1
thus collected from push carts in
streets at night.
French Absolve Smyrna l sses
Paris, Jan. 10.-A French C
holds that .the burning of Smy
in September, 1922, being a dli
consequence. of the Turko-Grec
fWar, the insurance companeia
not r.esponsible and can, not ega
be held liable for its losses.

MEET HERE 11
ADMINISTRATITJE OFFI
166 AMERICAN AND (
IAN SCHOOLS INV]

Inwho had spoken at fraternities.
Following a dinner in the main din- J. S. DeTar, '25M, chairman of the
ing room of the Union, the Gun and drive was asserted that it was hoped
Blade club held a smoker and meet- that the 100 percent mark attained by
ing for the purpose of acquainting the the Student Christian association
members of the club with ,Colonel I among . fraternities at the Massach-
Charles W. Spofford, district manager usetts Institute of Technology at Bos-
of the U. S. Veteran's Bureau and H ton, Mass., last fall, might be attain-
B. Day, sub-district manager. Col- here. DeTar also urged the parti-
onel Spofford spoke on "Patriotism cipants in the campaign as they
and Rehabilitation" and Mr. Day chose j brought in the subscription obtained
for his subject "Opportutity after Re- yesterday, to doubledtheir efforts in
habilitation". the next day of the drive.
"I believe that we should look to the
University men for the best kind of
patriotism," said Col. Spofford and'!BANG 0r ERMN fl liP
continued, "The patriotism of peace- t i[mv a h h
time is -much more valuable than that
of wartime and University men ar S
especially competent in supplying
just this kind of patriotism. The prob-
lems of peace are much more diffi- Hamburg, Jan. 10.-(ByAP)-The
cult than those of war." chief of a band of drug smugglers and
At the close of the talk,.Wilfred B. 60 of his confederates were arrested
Day, national president of the Gun here recently and officials estimate
and Blade club, gye a short talk on that in the last year or so drugs,
the work of the club and its aims chemicals and other pharmaceutical
Music for the evening was furnished pr
by Howard C. Rufus, '27, violinist,; products worth $12,000,00 have been
taken out of Germany illegally.
who was accompanied by Dwight M j The smugglers, posing as 'fisher-
Steele, '27. men, had their own sail boats as well
as motor launches, and plied about
Berlin, Jan. 1--Eugene O'Neill's the coasts. Most of the drugs in this
play, "The tmperor- Jones," at its way were landed in Holland, later
premiere in Berlin, got a better. being "retailed," and then shipped
ception than his "Anna' Chistie 'to America, England, France, or
but brought a protest from the mhili -iwherever the prices appeared to be
tarist paper Deutsche. Zetung, ,which the highest.
calls it "an Americaii search for sen- Customs officials assert that several
sations," trying "with wild stage go-betweens who have turned state
effects" to poke fun at Kaiserdom. evidence claim that thev were able

4

London, Jane -10-(By A P.)-The'
work of swearing in the members of
the new parliament- was~ completed,
without further incident and the house
adjourned until next Tuesday when
the ceremony of tho opening in state
will take place.
A cabinet council was in sessign for
more than two hours and. the King's
speech to be delivered at the state op-
ening was drafted. Its terms wereI
kept secret, but it was understood to
have been decided that the speechj
will refer only to the policy of tariff
legislation, having been reJeeted by the
electorate. It will propose, howev-,
er, to go on with the preference du-
ties promised to the voters.
JOHNSONWT UNUHNU
Members of the faculty of the phar-
macy college honored C. *. Johnsohb
dean of the pharmacy college of the
University of Washington,i S'eattle
with an informal luncheon $ . yes-
terday noon at the Union.
While in Ann Arbor, Dean Johnson
discussed a national pharmaceutical
survey to be held soon. The commit-
tee in charge of the survey is to gath-
er in Buffalo, and the Dean stopped
in Ann Arbor on the way to attend
this meeting. This committee was se-1

.
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-wn e wa 'Prn ino nf .e ers ur
Spaulding house, a girlis' rooming 1868, and later attended the School of
house at 1022 Forest avenue, was' Berlin, Jan. 10--(By A.P.)-More Beaux Arts, in ,the same city, where
damaged by i 're of unknown origin than -10 .separatist leaders have al- he received his first instruction in
early yesterday morning. The fire' ready fallen victims to. lynch law in J the arts which were 'later to absorb
was chiefly confined to 'the basement 'the Palatinate, according to reports his who'e life. After finishing there
where it burned the beams support- received here, although official quar- he was appointed to a number of ar-
ing the first floor. ters have not yet been apprised of tistic missions on the Russian state
The ' fire department responded to the extent to which the populous is He became a member of a number of
the call at 4:47 o'clock, in time tc. meting out summary justice to the prominent continental artistic socie-
check the flames, but smoke had al- cessionists. ties. He is an officer of the Legion
ready filled the house. It was neces- Authentic. details of the killings at of Honor and a member of the tius-
sary to bring down by ladder four Speyer, including the assasination of sian Academy of Beaux Arts. An in-
girls on the- third floor unable to use Hei-r Heintz, president of the auton- teresting fact about Mr. Bakst is that
the stairs because of the smoke. Mary omous government, were obtainable in he has direct descent through the1
Ellen -.Briggs, '26, was injured when Berlin up to a late hour, but the cab- Scherya family of Spain, from King
she jumped from a second story win- Inet discussed the general situation in David of bible fame.
dow to avoid the smoke. Her ankle the region which is reported to be ex-,
was badly sprained. tremely grave
Chemicals only were used in ex-- -r -- --
tinguishing the fire, avoiding damage E
through the use of water.'FOr TIs E en2ng
S aaIA dinner dance, entirely separate
-EST VI INI re ' 1 ii ID TIUfl T from the regular Union dances, will
WESTVIIbINI iii~j . ii FIREIN UIIJLU be held from 6 to 8 'o'clock 'tonight
in the main dining room of the Un-
SFO RESIDE T i O 10-Cbmcagoan . par- ion; This dance 'will in'no wayin;
ticulArly those 'in trade, -profitas terfere with the;regular dance to be'
much from contact with foreign stu- held later in the even-ing.l
Parkersburg, W. Va., Jan. 10-By A I dents coming to this country to study Music will be furnished by Paul Wil-
P.)-John W. Davis, former ambassa- as do the students, Edward M. Hurley son's Wolverines which plays for ;the'
dor to Great Britain, a native of West ' former head of the U. S. shipping regular Union dances. If the dance
Virginia, was endorsed as Democrat- board, told . 430 foreign students and proves to be a success more of a like e
ic candidate for president by the West consuls of 12 countries at a dinner to- nature will probably be held later on
Virginia democratic executive com- night. in the season. The admission price
mittee in session here today. The vote "Before the war it was asserted that wi'l be $1 a couple.,
was 32 in favor of the resolution with only 100 Americans had an interna-
eight votes against it. tional view point" he said. "Obvious- Priest Convicted for Larceny a
Opposition to the action was voiced ly the war has added to this number. Melun, France, Jan. 10.-The graft- I
by some members on the grounds that "I am optimistic on foreign trade ers who sold the statute of the Virgin
the resolution was proposed and dis- , Just now our trade with foreign coun- and Child taken from the Little1
cussed at a meeting attended by some I tries is real because they are buying fhurch of St. Sauveur-sur-Ecole, nearf
500 deiocratic supporters in addition from us 'in the face of strong compe- Paris, have been convicted, the Rev.
to mnembers of the committee. tition from European countries be- Fr. Henri Rotte being fined 50 francs
cause, they feel they are getting their and given a suspended sentence of a
Earthquake Recorded money's worth. The trade. we are month in prison.l
Berkeley, Cal., Jan. 10-An earth building"on this basis is going to be
quake of four minutes nine seconds prominent." Spanish Exfile To Live On Island
duration 'was recorded by the Uni Madrid, Jan. '10.-Te Marus
evrsit 'of - 'California seismograph ''r' '-Crtina, exiled .- for writing Mting s
Wednesday. rT Tagainst the directorate, has started1
TOA LfU U~lIU ortneildfrwitingtis
1. t1 UCfor Fuerte Ventura Island, in th Can-
Tempest Strikes French Coast ''aries, where" living conditions arf
Paris, Jan. 10.-A tempest, accomp- T pimitive, the climate extremelyht
anled' by a strong tidal wave, struck UINP B TS and communication irregular.
the entire French coast Wednesday, n
causing heavy loss to vessels both-at 'A last chance to'obtain booths for 23 Filipinos Killed..
anchor and under way. ~ the J-hop 'will be given fraternities Manila, Jan. 9.--Thirteen members'
and other organizations in the main of the Philippine constabulary, - in-
France Sends Envoy lobby of the Union from 2 to 3 o'- cluding two officers, have been kill-
Peris, Jan. 9.-Henri Franklin- 1 clock this, afternoon. ed by religious fanatics on Bucas
Bouillon, former minister of state, Only a few booths remain which Island, off the northeast coast of
has left for Russia to arrange a has- make s it necessaryfor mthie whin:, 1 Mindanao, acording to official advies

DILEMMA

to get 20 to 30 percent more for their
contraband goods whenever repre-
sentatives of American customers
were in the market, whether in Ant-
werp, Amsterdam or Hamburg.
Gen. Wood to Name Native Officers
Manila, Jan. 10.-Gen. Wood has de-
cided to appoint more Moros to office
in Mindanao, in an effort to settle

I .

DAILY TO HOLD OP.
ON BOX WORLD P

In an effort 'to cooperate i
the referendum, being undertak
en by the.American Peace Awar
in order to allow the people t
make known their approval o
disapproval of the prize winn
ing proposal for world neace

You either need a thing or3
don't. If it's the former,
n: ilr nrn on"'om+ * r v r.rl

you
It's
V..

lected by the American conference of
faculties of pharmacy colleges. I

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