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January 06, 1924 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

S IN PEKIN
STER TOTAL 8

Marshal Foch Has
New War Bonnet
4 .rc',r
~4.

Storm. Handicaps Searchers In Strug-.
gle to Find Missing
Victims
EIGHTEEN MEN IN HOSPITAL;
EXPECT SOME TO LOSE EYES
Pekin, IlL., Jan. 5.-(By AP)--The
death today of two of the men ser-
iously injured in the explosion and
fire at the Corn Products company
plant here early Thursday increased
to eight the number of known dead.
Twenty four or twenty five workmen
are missing. No bodies were recov-
ered today, searchers being handi-
capped by the severe weather. Only
two victims have been removed from
the wreckage, both being brought out
yesterday.
Federal investigation scheduled to
begin today was postponed until to-
morrow pending the arrival of E. J.
Price, dust explosion expert of Wash-
ington. Until he arrives, superintend-
ent B. H. Lawtoni, of the plant, said
there would be no attempt made to re-
pair an official explanation of the ex-
plosion and estimate of property
damage.
Doctor F. C. Gale, company physi-
cian, denied the report that most of
the 18 workmen at the Pekin hospital
would lose their eye sight. All ex-
cept two have good chances to re-
cover, he said.
ENTOR BORAH OPPOSER
SOLDIERS' BONUS BILL

lasting" enamel prepared by Dinant'
from formulas traced to ancient Egypt.
The helmet is of copper and silver sur-
mounted by the Gallic cock and bear-
ing insignia of Foch's supreme rank.
Alumni News Told
in Brief
Officers for 1924 will be elected at
the special meeting of the Cleveland1
Alumni club caled for tomorrow noon
at the Big Ten University club of that
city. In addition, at the meeting wilb
be taken up ratification of the newa
constitution according to the new gen-
eral alumni program.
Two new alumni clubs are now be-
ing organized, one in Springfield
Mass., under the direction of Arthura
E. Hobbs, '17, the other at Dayton, O.
with Karl Phares, '14L, as head.
A new board of governors has been
named by the University of Michigan;
club of San Francisco for the con-
ing year. These are: C. R. Wright
'12L, president; C. L. Queen, '13, H
H. Hushel, '13, A. J. Bancroft, '16L:
Albert Leob, 92L, W. H. Grant, '04
G. V. Whitney, '99E, H. L. Nutting:
'15L, L. K. Duschak, '04.
Elmira, N. Y., alumni are the first to
pay their per capita dues to the1
Alumni association here. T. Hawley
Tapping, '16L, field secretary of the
association, also announces that
information has been received that the
Detroit club will do so within a short
time.

EXPECT COMMITTEE TO
UPHOLD ADMINISTRATIONi
Lansiv, Mich., Jan. 5.-Indorsement
of the Coolidge Administration isl
possible at a meeting of the republi-i
can state central commttee to be -held
in Grand Rapids Friday.
At that time the committee will fix
the time and place for the spring con-
vention that will select the 33 delegates1
to the national convention at Cleve-
land in June.
As yet there is no definite indica-I
tion of the committee taking such'
action, but it is being talked over by
various members. In several states thej
republican state committees have re-
gently indorsed the Coolidge admin-
istration. Such a move is considered
tantamount to indorsing President
Coolidge for renomination.
Fred W. Green, of Ionia; chairman
of the republican state central com-
-mittee, writes that there is no founda-
tion for the reports that he is backing'

both Governor Albert E. Sleeper for
United States Senator and Herbert F
Baker for Governor. Says Mr. Green:
"I tam taking no part in the can-
didacy of either of these men. I am
a friend of each, and, as a friend
have urged Mr. Sleeper not to be al
candidate for Senator, and am still
hopeful that he will listen to this
advice.
"I have not decided who to supportI
for Governor. I have, however, pro-I
gressed farenugh 'to say that I am
opposed to i t hir d term for Gov. Alex-

Yacht Completes I For six weeks the men encount
rain, fog and calm before sigh
4,000-M ile LTriptheir goal. The trip was starte
a Friday, as Dr. Ellis says, ju:
discredit superstitions of the
Portland. Ore., Jan. 5.-After battl- They narrowly escaped falling in
ing the elements for 42 days, their lit- hands of Chinese pirates, the w
tle engineless craft buffeted about by coast at that time being infested
perilous _gales and rain-soaked food them.
their only nourishment, nine men and Prof. L.J oydof the homoeoj
a boy, all inexperienced in ocean nav-.Pr, L J. Boydbofoeheop
igationi, successfully completed a-4,- i ward, will speak before the Del
000 mile trip across the Pacific Ocean Practitioners society, Tuesdayeven
,. .. ..at their regular meeting held in,

ander J. Groesbeck." I!in a small sailing yacht, the first time
in history for a craft of its kind to
Jn. 5.-O third of the make the journey.
Paris,Jan.5Onet oThe party, headed by Dr. R. H. El-
French Senate will be renewed to- lis, owner of the yacht, started from
morrow by indirect suffrage,, the vot- Yokohama, at which port Dr. Ellis
ers being deputies, members of the bought the 82-footer Dwyn Wen. It'
departmental and war councils, and has a 20-foot beam and is constructed
of steel and teak.
delegates elected by the municipal j
councils. _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _
Lansing, Jan. 5.-A warning that no "Merrick-Fette"
further time extension after Jan. 15
will be allowed for the purehas e of au- h I1SeRu
tomobile license plates is issued byi
Secretary of State Charles J. Deland. ( Ti V (l CT nTAYT T V

au Llltlll -haiv~ d 111Ci1a. .rn LItih .
city.
Fielding H. Yost, director of inter-
collegiate athletics, will return tomor-
row from his home in Nashville,
Tenn., where he has been visiting rela-
tives.
Chelsea, Jan. 5.- Through a deal
consummated this week the Chelsea
Tribune has been merged with the
Chelsea Standard.
I

oll Sam In 51'

PHOTOCRAFT SHOP
Extends New Year's Greetings to all.

C.JINLY JIO E Q4UALl I I
-THE BEST
New rugs arriving every
few days.
On display at
818 CHURCH ST.

Goodyear's
Jauary
Clearance

.1

Foch and his new "war bonnet"
A new "war bonnet" has been de-
signed for Marshal' Foch, allied gen-
eralissimo in the World war, by Jean
I Dinant, famous French artist. It is
profusely decorated with an; "evei-

We are showing new tallys, place cards, bridge scores, etc.
Special sale on pottery, vases, cameras, desk sets,
fancy candles.

124 SOUTH MAIN

Phone 3124-M

New York, Jan. 5.-Asserting that
the question of tax reduction ought to
be made a crusade in this country
Senator William E. Borah, of Idaho
told the national republican club of
New York today that the greatest con-
tribution the nation could make to the
ex-soldier would be the stability ,of
the country for lower taxes.
Vigorously opposing the soldier
bonus which was championed by Ed- ,
ward B. Stafford, New York state
commander of the American region;
Sen. Borah declared tax reduction and
the bonus could not be reconciled.
INVIDDIE LaS WORK
OF HEALTH SOITION
Washington, Jan. 6.-With the pub-
lication here today of its first annual
report, prepared by Courtenay Dinwid-
die, general executive, the American
chid health association ,which was
formed a year ago under the presi-
dency of Herbert Hoover, definitely
takes its place as one of the most pro-
gressive health agencies ever formed
in this country.
Formed by an amalgamation of the
American child hygiene association
and the child health organization of
America, the American child health
association began its career last Jan-
uary. Inheriting a yearly expendit-
ure of $200,000, it now plans for serv-
ice requiring an outlay of $425,000. In
support of such a budget it has al-
ready doubled its membership.
BRITAIN ESTRANGED BY
AFGHANISTAN CONDUGT
London, Jan. 5.-War between Brit-
ain and Afghanistan with probable
intervention of soviet Russia on the
side of Afghanistan, is now threaten-
ed as the result of murders of Brit-
ish officers and their wives by Af-
ghanistan bandits on the border be-
tween India and Afghanistan.
An ultimatum has been sent by
Britain to the amir of Afghanistan,
warning him that diplomatic relations
will be broken off unless he catches
and punishes these bandits. The amir
has done little, however, despite the
fact it is generally believed it would !
be easy for him to apprehend the
criminals.
CHILBLAINs
FROZEN-FEET
Need attention. I cure them.
IRVING WARMOULTS, D.S.C.
Chiaropodist and Orthopodist
707 N. Uni. Ai e. Phone 2652

Treat yourself
better by eating
at the
VARSITY INN

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