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December 14, 1923 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE I1VMr HIGAN DAIL

f,0OR CAMIGN FUND
GRAMN) RAPIDS GROUP RISES !
$500 OF MfEMBERSHIP
PLEDGE
According to reports that have been
tecelved at the Alumnae council head-
quarters, alumnae in various Michigan
,Cities, have been showing great inter-
e st as roups, in the campaign for the
Univerity of Michian :League build-
ng ;funrd.
Mrs. 'Athur H1. !Vandenberg, of
ran Rapids, in 'a recent letter to
M7rs.Mollie Price Cooke campaign ad-
visor, announced that $500, which is
half of the Grand Rapids membership
pledge, is being sent to the council to
;fe used in helping to defray adminis-.
trative expenses. The Grand Rapids
women inaugurated several plans for
rsing money for campaign purposes
last year and during the club year of
1923-24 earned ;approximately $2125.
Mrs. T. G. Yoemans, of St. Joseph,
~resident of the Berrien county alum-
-tae group,, in a ommn unicaton to Mrs.
Cook, stated that 200 'tickets at $1
each, were issued among ,the alumnae
from Berrien Springs, Dowagac and
B.ridgeman, for a bridge party which
was held on Dec. 8. The .procee.
from this affair will be given over foi
campaign purposes.
A joint meeting for the alumnae and
alumni of the lberrien county asoca-
tiohn is being pl anned for January. The
alumhnae will also give a tea and mus-
kcale bar the benefit of the University
Of Mihigan League building fund dur-
ing the latter part of that month.
008BSWILL ABOREsS
AMERICAN SSOCIATION
The Regular monthly meeting of the
Ann Arbor branch of the American
Assocation of University women will
be held at 3 o'clock Saturday, Jan. 5,
at Helen Newberry residence.
Prof. W. H. Hobbs, of the geology
departmWent has been secured to speak
t this meeting. The subject of his.
talk Will be, "Earthquakes and the
Foretelling of Earthquakes." He will
llustrate his talk with appropriate
I~ntern elides.
Po du cts Of Near
East On Display
Anl exhibition of the products of the
'tear fast will be hield from -2 to 6
o 'clock today at the home of. Mrs.
arion L. Burton, 81 outh nver-
sity avenue.
Two weeks ago Mrs. Burton took
rders for more than $200 worth o
Near Eastern andiwork, among which
are many, flussign cross-stitched
pieces, bags, handmade adkerchiefs, l
etcetera.: Those' who ordered articles
it that time may obtain them this aft-I
ernoen -at Mrs. Burton's home. There
w1ll be additionl articles 'on display,1
some of -which will be for sale.

Mortarboard has now received the1
French gloves ordered by the women
earlier in the fall. They may be ob-
tained from those women who took the
orders.

She Lectures
Law And

On
Politics!

Hospital Mailma,
With Letter-
"Dear Santa Claus :
Iam writing you this letter to
tell youI am in the hospital with
Imany sick boys and girls. Please do
not forget to come and visit each one
of them. know the children want
you to bring each one of them a gift;
X would like you to bring me an elec-
tric train. And there is another boy,
I will tell you to brim; him one too.
"Good-bye, dear Santa 'Claus,
"from George J."
This letter by an 8 year old boy,
is a sample of those written by 150
child patients at the University hos-
pital. George and 149 other little suf-
ferers, some hopelessly crippled, have
been waiting for Santa Claus 'to come
for days. Christmas is the one bright
spot in their lives. They wait for it
patiently, making toys and ornaments
to adorn the trees which will be placed
in their wards on Christmas eve. Some
of these children have spent months in.
the hospital, and face a future of be-
ing permanent cripples and invalids.
Four year old Jack, who has been
in the hospital for a long time receiv -
ing treatment for an almost incur-
able disease, wanted Santa Claus to
bring him a sled last year. When
Christmas eve arrived and the hour
for all of the children to hang up
their stockings came, Jack looked
WHITNEYSaturday
SMessrs. Schubert are bringing
fdirect from its two year run in
New York the entire
GREAT CENTURY THEATER
CAST AND PRODUCTION
in the most delightful operetta
of two generations. Based on the
life *and romanice of Franz
Schubert.

Not only do the 'children appreciatet
n Is ~ luge what is done for them at Christmas
s TO S anta Claus time, but also do the 500 adult pati-1
ents. They are as mtuch touched byl[
attention as the children. One pati-
worried, and, when asked why, he re- ent a former inmate of a prison, wept
plied that he didn't see how Santa! last year when presented a small but
Claus was going to get a sled in his ! useful gift, saying that it was the first
stocking. However, he was not long present he had received in 19 years.
in devising a remedy, and he hung a( "In giving to the patients," said Miss
pillow slip in place of the stocking.I! Dorothy Ketcham, director of social
The next morning the slip containedi service, "one should consider, aside
the longed for sled. This year Jack from. the pleasure der'iv'ed from the
wants an automobile, and he is going. giving, the contribution to the devel-
to get it. l opment of the person receiving it.
One litte girl lay strapped to her Make the gifts as permanent as pos-
bed, reading a book "like Santa Claus sible." ,:t1
is going to bring." She ton will be One hundred and :fifty dolls have j
happy on Christmas morning. An- i been dressed by the University Y. W.
ether lad lying with his leg strapped C. A. and numerous other gifts for old I
in the air is ,waiting for mechanical and young have been received from
toys with which to busy himself. others:
And Santa will come on Christ- Forty or fifty trees ranging in size,
mas eve. In all probability the child- from large to small, "are needed in the
ren will awaken as he .enters the wards for Christmas morning. The
wards, as they have in other years. staff is relying on the various houses,
Will feel of the fur on his coat, pull= donating their trees from Christmas
his beard to see if it is real, and take' parties, as they have other years.
hold of his hands. In the morningl Houses are urged 'to call the sociali
they will think it was a dream untilI service department immediately if
they see the tree andI tneir gifts. they are willing to donate trees, in

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euuSS tc t'tFtt7 P: x 11N1f 14R'boR:?

I TODAY AND
SATURJ]FDAY

-1

order that the truck may be sent for
them on Friday.

It's true efnclE
Classiefieds--Adv.

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64

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It's Jammed. Full of E&
citement That You Shou]
See--

X"-
Unseen Dangers!

Mysterious Rites!
, Strange Secre

r--

/,« ,

Abound in
This Photo-
Sylva Bremer
uy Mashall.

ly.

°-=-

Miss Sarah Wttmbaugh
Miss Sarah Wambaugh is ,a former
member of the secretariat of the Lea-
gue of Nations and attended all its
sessions. She is an authority on in-
ternational law, has lectured before
the American Academy of Political and
Social Science and was the only wom-
an to be invited to speak at the In-
stitute of Politics of Williams college
during the summer of 1923.t
Miss Wambaugh was born in Ohio.
Her father, Prof. Eugene Wambaugh,
of Harvard university, is a student and
teacher of international law. She fol-.
lowved in her father's footsteps and
graduated from Radcliffe college in
1902, taking her master's degree in
1916. Since then she has taken grad-I
uate work in history and "political sci-
ence at Oxford and in the University
of London. She has taught law at Rad-
cliffe and Wellesley.
Spending considerable time in Ger-
many since the wvar, Miss Wamjbaugh
has interviewed all11 classes of pr ople
'-peasants ,clerks,' railway wr rkers,
diplomats and government her is.
Patronize The Daily Advertisers.

Your
C'hristmas Cravat
O F COURSE you'll look
your best. And a Cheney
Cravat adds that final,,dis-
tin ctive touch which is: al-
ways apparent in the dress
of men who are mindful of
detail.
Craftsmanship of weave and
design, wide combinations
of colours, and long-wearing
qualities have made the
name Cheney, on the neck-
band, mean something to
college men.
Made by
CHENEY BROTHERS
Makers- of Cheney Silks
Sold 4

IAdded "UPIN THE AIR" Suislilne Comedyf
We extend to our manyM e r
patrons and friends returning Aer
home for the Holidays, a Xa
most pleasant-.vacation and-,k11~1
:.:-COMING SUNDAY-.
;Here's a. Mystery That Baffled Scotland Yard for Years!.

I

of-

1'

I ...NOW 1

N. F. ALLEN & CO.
WADHAMS &' CO.
J. F. WUE RTT
MACK & CO..

ITS A , iV
COIAN itid HAM MRS-
PROI)UL'CT IO N
The Problem-" Who Killed

EVERY LAST
CHARACTER A
REAL STAR
Andrews Prentice?

M

t + c= = m OaIws s x = M im 11 mr mu o o n a r m I~r ld r r 1Mi lr s

TOD)AY anid TOMIORROW

""Th ci"

All women who-are planning to stay
in Ann Arbor during the Christmas
vacation are asked to sign in the of-
fice of the dean of women so that theyj
mnay be reached for any activities of
the Women's League.
Sororities and league houses re-'
maining open during Christmas vaca-
tion which are willing to rent rooms
to women who are spending the vaca-,
tion in Ann Arbor, are asked to notify'
Miss Mildred Sherman at the office of
the dean of women.,

AL SO

"T-EVICTOR RECORDING ORCHESTRA"

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HOLIDAYION

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IT UP FOR.*REFERE C I:

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AS USUAL'
THE BEST

SaSunday thru Wednesday, December 16, 1 7, 18, 19.
"THE SILENT COMMAND" with ALMA TELL, EDMUND LO WE and MARTHA
"Snub" Pollard in "California or~ Bust,"' and Pathe News.
Thursday thru Saturday, December 20, 21, 22.
SHIRLEY MASON in ""THE ELEVENT HHOUR, " with Charles :Jones and Alan HaIle:.
Joe Rock in "In Bad in Bagdad," and Pathe News.
Sunday thrua Wednesday, December 23, 24, 25, 26.
Unusual Christmas Presentation.
JOHN GILBERT, BARBARA LA MARR, and B ESSIE [.QVE, in "STo ELMO."
"tour Gang", in "A Pleasant Journey.'"
Pathe News.

MANSFIELD.

in an
ENTIRELY NEW PROGRAM

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Thurs~day thru Saturday, December 27, 28, 29.
"LOYAL LIVES,",with Mary Carr and William Collier, Jr.
Mont~y Banks in "A COLD RECEPTION," and Pathe News.
Sunday thru Tuesday, December 30, 31 and January 1.
PERCY MARMONT, the star of "If Winter Comes," with Cullen Landis- and Alice Calhoun, in "THE MID-
NIGHT ALARM.",
Ar_ .her of the famous "Spat Family" comedies, and Pathe News
Attractions Coming to the Wuerth extSeester Include
JACK LONDON'S great dog story, "THE CALL OF THE:WIL.".
MRS. WALLAC REID'S "HUMAN WRECK.AGE."
RUTH CLIFFORD in "MOTHER'S-IN-LAW.
ELINOR GLYNN'S "THE WORL D'S A STAGE
MARY PICKFORD and HOLBROOK BLINN. in "ROSITA."
CHARLES CHAPLIN presents.EDNA PURVIANCE in "A WOMAN OF PARIS."
And "TEA WITH A KICK," with Louise Fazenda, Chester Conklin, Hank Mann, Doris May, Z asu Pitts, Creighton
Hale, Ralph Lewis, Stuart Holmes, Sidney D'Albrook and Rosemary Theby.
The WUERTH ORCHESTRA, under the personal direction of Nicholas D. Falcone, accompanies the feature at every evening
performance and at the Sunday matinees. With the excellent features, the fine comedies, and the best in music, the

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