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September 27, 1923 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-27

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SIX

ITHE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1923

_ r=- -

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,1

RE L SCIM AG
"ARMY"WININ
TEA S LINE-UP PRACTICALLY
SAMIE AS ON TUESDAY AND
GET lAR) WQRKOUT
WITH ERSPOON SHOWS
WELL MAKING SCORE!

Pretty Rins Featuge Drill; Lack of
Mani to Hit Line Still Handicap
to Varsity
After two days of scrimmage devoted
to certain aa ects of .the game the
Varsity football squad went through'
a real scrlniage yesterday on Ferry
field with everything allowed and ev-
er thin used.
'here was no limitation of passing
alone, punting'alone or plunging alone
but everything went and the squad had
the hardest session it has experiencedj
thus far, the "Army" or blue team'
winning in 'a 50 minute period by a
of 6-0.
Line-Up Same
The two teams lined up with most
of the same men used in previous
practice workouts. The blue team had
Rockwell at quarter, Captain Kipke
and Herrnstein on the halves and
"IRed" Miller at fullback, with Brown
in the center of the line, Dewey and
Swan on guards, Vandervoort and
Muirhead on tackles and Marion and
Witherspoon on the ends. The red
toan which goes under the cognomen,
of "Navy" used Grube to call signals,
Heston and Lawson on halves, Vick at
full, Mills at the pivot position with
White and Hawkins on each side of
him, Mote and Babcock at the tackles
and Curran and Palmer taking care of
the wings.
The blue team kicked off to openI
the scrimmage and the reds after fail-
ing to gain their yards punted to the
blues. The same fate befell this team
only more so when Kipke in punting
had his kick blocked as the blue line
gave way, and the red team recovered
on their opponents' 30 yard line. Herea
again the red eleven failed to gain
ground and was forced to attempt, a
drop kick the ball ' rolling out ofI
boui'ds on the one yard line.
Blues Vain on Nicks#
Kipke at once punted outof danger
and after this the blue team kept gain-
ing on every exchange of kicks until
they were well into the red territoryj
where after making first down twice,
Witherspoon took the ball over for a
score. The red* blocked the attempt
COACH SULLIVANHAS 251
*MEN 01 YEARLING SQUADr
*FI Et SI DAN IA RRIE t M E N TOR
PLtENA SE I B Y rT rvS N ? 1rT MORE
CAN DHDATEN EXPECTEI)

for the extra point after touchdown.
From then on the ball see-sawed
back and forth from each team neither
team being able to advance much when
the ball was in its possession, although
l-errnstein failed in an attempt to kick
a field goal for the blues, when they
neared the goal line once.
The bright spot of the day was the
fplaying of Witherspoon who was
changed to the backfield when a slight
injury to Kipke forced his removal
from the game. Kipke is all right how-
ever and will be back in today or to-
morrow. Witherspoon, playing half,
was the most consistent groundgainer
of the atfternoon andl in fact has been
the best man at carrying the ball who
has shown up this season. He-seems
almost too fast for his interference
and if he continues the brand of foot-
ball which he displayed yesterday he
must be considerel seriously for a
backfield berth.
Baker Makes iNIce Run
Baker, who replaced Rockwell at
quarter on the blues after the latter
hurt his leg, got away for a couple of"
ice runs after receiving kicks. One
of his returns was good for 30 or 35
y ards through a broken field.
With each succeeding day it becomes
more and more obvious that the Var-
I sity nust develop a man who can hit
the line. With the exception of With-
erspoon no one on the squad has
plunged through the line with any
degree of success and even Wither-
spoon made most of his gains through
or off tackle: No other man on the
squad has hit the line in a way which
will nroduce results. Michigan has
j enough men to practically take care
of the other types of offensive but un-
less a line plunger is found the team
Will be badly' handicapped.

All of 1923 Team Back Witll Excep-
tion of Isbell: Several Sopho-
mores ILook Good
EFIRST' MEET AGAINST AGGIES
ON SAiIE DAY AS if.A.C. GAME
With the return of all of last year's
squad but Isbell, who was lost by
graduation, the Varsity cross country
outlook is one of optimism both with
Coach Farrell and the team.
Captain Arndt, Bowen, Rearick and
Shenefield form the nucleus for this
year's team. harry Davis, '25, Var-
sity two miler, is now eligible for
Cross Country and will be seen wth
the team this fall. The only disap-
pointment will be the absence of
Charles Reinke, '25, who has been ad-
vised by Coach Farrell not to com-
pete with the harriers this fall. Dur-
ing the past summer Reinke under-
went an operation and has not fully
recovered from it. Any attempt now
by him would seriously hamper his
chances to again capture the West-
ern Conference half mile champion-
shil which he now holds.
Se; erl lPromising Sophomores
From last year's Freshman team
come Miles Reinke, brother of the
Conference champion, as tlhe moist
likely candidate to fill the vacancy
left by Isbell along with Murray, who
Coach Farrell considers as first class
Varsity material. Hicks and Calla-
hin, also members 'of last year's
freshman squad, are about on a par
with Murray. Before the season opens
these men will probably be filling a
regular position.
The candidates return with the
highest of spirits and are out to re-
peat last year's victory. As was the
case last year Wisconsin looms as the
most formidable opponent. They, too
suffer the same fate as Michigan, los-
ing their best man, Scott, around
whom last year's team was built.
Open Against Aggles
The schedule this year calls for the
opening race with the Aggies on the
morning of the Michigan A. C. foot-
ball conflict. This will be followed
by a triangular meet with Ohio State
and Illinois on the morning of the
Quantico Marine gridiron game. The
annual dual meet between Wisconsin
and Michigan follows the triangular
meet. The Western Conference cham-
pionship will close the season. This
year the meet will be held at Ohio
State the Saturday of the Ohio State-
Illinois football game. At some time
during the season the Harphan Tro-
lihy race will be staged. Coach Far-
Tryouts for Intramural man-
. ager should report at the Intra-
mural office at 3 o'clock this af-
ternoon.
Robert O. Young,f
Intramural Manager.

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

01110 STATE
6-Ohio Wesleyan.
13-Colgate.
20-Michigan at Au
27-Iowa.
3-Denison.
10-Purdue at La
17-Chicago at Ch
24-Illionis.

Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

27-Minnesota.
3-Open.
10-IllinoiP at Urbana.
17-Michigan.
24-Chieago at Chicago.
MI NNE SOTA,

nn Arbor.
affayette.
icago.

BIG TEN FOOTBALL SCH

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

MICHIGAN
G-ICase.
13-Vanderbilt.
20-Ohio State.
27-Michigan Aggies.
3-Iowa at Iowa City.
10-Quantito Marines.
17--Wisconsin at 'Madison.
24-Minnesota.

6-Open.
13--IHaskell Indians.
20--North Dakota.
27- \isconsin at Madison.
3-Northwestern.
10-Open.
17---IowNa.:
24-M1lichigan at Ann Arbor.
L DUR)UE
G- pen.
13-Iowa at Iowa City.
20--Wabash.
27-Chicago at Chicago.
3-Notre ])ame at South Bend.
10-Ohio State.
17--Northwestern.
24-Indiana at Bloomington.

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

TIEALOT ENT
U' l lIiTS LL CHOU PS1

ED ULESaxies wa cut in' exactly the same
ration as that for students.
ICass Preferences Impossible
After careful consideration of the
:crrill, last year's .rack freshman best way to distribute extra tickets
end, is sclheduiled to !ake his place at to students, the athletic association
one of the flank positions with Cun- has decided on the present method
nhlugham and Friend, of last year at as the only one possible under exist-
the other. (,prain Petcoff and Steele, ing circumstances. This provided
vae ra( n tackles, are slated to take that "studwnts may purchase three
their old postio0Us, Dunlop, Kutler, $2.50 tickets as long as tickets are
veterans, and Long are booked for the available and may secure one adjac-
guards, while Youg, varsity center ent seat in exchange for student cou-
tVo years back, will fill the pivot po- pon properly signed in ink." In the
sition. Judy, who called signals the case of the O. S. U. game the num-
1 ittter part of last ea.son is back, as ber has been cut down to two extra
is P otthoff, t., poi-nd guard, tickets.
_ TV I - . 7... 1..a .. .. .. . 1.1..

IOWA
Sept. 23-Oklahoma
Oct. 6-Knox.
Oct. 13-Purdue.
Oct. 20-Illinois.
Oct. 27-Ohio Stater
Nov. 3-Michigan.
Nov. 10-Open.
Nov. 17-Minnesota
Nov. 24--Northwest
ton.

Aggies.

A lblet Ic Office, lIAuds $1,00
A Ismni Xl'a tnsAre Sold
Out for O.S. . (Gamue

to

at Columbus.
at Minneapolis
ern at Evans-

I.NDIIANA
Oct. 6-IDepauw.
Oct. 13-Northwesturn

at Indianap-

AL & fl 1 R) ToNo llIE Ii

ohs.

20--Wisconsin

I

Oct.c
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

ILLINOIS
6-Nebraska.
1'3-Butler.
20-Iowa at Iowa City.
27-Northwestern at Evanston.
3-Chicago.
10-Wisconsin.
17-Mississippi Aggies.
24-Ohio State at Columbus.

d

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t

World Series Fight
In New York Again
Baseball fans, at least those living
outside of Gotham, will have to be

content to miss the world series once
more. Three times in as many years
the Giants and the Yankees have
cinched their respective league pen-
iant and the "big series" will take
place at the Polo grounds.
The result of this season's games
is far from satisfying even to New
Yorkers whose teams have again
found their way to the top, to sad
nothing of the supporters of other
clubs which have again failed to headl
the list. Ticket sale!. for both Giant
# and Yankee games have dropped con-
sistently during the past two years
and no one seems satisfied.
Early season dopesters who figured
Pittsburg and Cinncinati to push back
the National league champions were
not far from wrong in their estimates
of the teams.'- Pittsburg with a
squad pf men who are at their best
this year and Cinncinati with a crow(]
of brilliant yearlings in its ranks#
have both shown well as the critics
planned, but the Giants have headed
them with a golden bat.
Dancing Saturday night at Jim
Burke's Dancing Pavilion, Whitmore
Lake. Ad v.

CHICAGO
Sept. 29,-Michigan Aggies.
Oct. 6-Colorado Aggies.
Oct. 23-Open.
Oct. 20-Northwestern.
Oct. 27-Purdue.
Nov. 3-Illinois at Urbana.
Nov. 10-Indiana.
Nov. 17-Ohio State.
Nov. 24-Wisconsin.
NORTHWESTERN
Oct. 6-Beloit.
Oct. 23--Indiana at Indianapolis.
Oct. 20-Chicago at Chicago.
Oct. 27-Illinois.
Nov. 3-Minnesota at Minneapolis.
Nov. 10-Lake Forest.
Nov. 17--Purdue at Lafayette.
Nov. 24-Iowa.

V LL. (JV-{Y 17 .i All of the large groups of ticket
Oct. 27-Open. Alo .
Nov. 3--Hanover. buyers have been limited in the num-
Nov. 10-iChicago at Chicago. her of extra tickets they are allow-
Nov. 17-Wabash. ed for the O. S. U. game. More than
Nov. 24--Purdue. $15,000 has been refunded to alumni
alone, and this (does not include what
might hAve been returned if the ath-
tin iirHir flfPOINTS P letic 5ss0Cialtion hai 'not sent iS-.
M djta bes all over the country to the
effect that stands are completely sold
out.
For the 6,000 reserved seats in the
Ferry field stadium tickets have been
0I10 SATEHits IYET ,U 'iI tdistributed as follows: aluinmi have
010"A received 13,000 seats, Ohio State sup-
B - SAporters have beenallowed 7,500 tick-
ets, 1000 seats are reserved for the
faculty, a block of 2,100: seats is set
Special to The Daly aside for "1141" club complimentary
Columbus, Ohio, Sept. SW-Still tickets and players on the Varsity,
smarting from that 19-0 defeat admin- I and students are allowed 13,000 seats.1
istered by Coach Yost's. gridiron pu- Members of the squad receive two
pils last year at the dedication of the complimentary tickets for every year
new stadium, Ohio State is working on the team, and have the chance toj
overtime, with the set determination purchase four additional tickets. This,
to "Beat Michigan". is the only group that will be allowed
Altliough starting their gridiron ac- I the usual number of tickets. ,.The al-
tivities on the same (lay as the Wol- lotuicnt of extra tickets for facoilty,
verines, Coach Wilce's squad was the alumni, the "M" club and comp li-
sent through their initial scrimmage
on the third dpy of practice, instead - ____-
of waiting for the customary week of Trainer's Staff Needs Men
preliminary drill, and the Buckeye -_I_
mentor has ordered scrimmages ev- A man experienced in ban-
ery day since with the exception of ( daging and massaging is need-
Friday, when a light signal drill was ed to work on the trainer's staff
held. from 2 to 6:30 o'clock after-
Not only is Ohio State set upon noons. Anyone interested should
avenging the defeat of that afternoon, apply to Trainer Hoyt at the
but their dogged determination is !Ferry field club house.
backed with the best material that
has reported to Coach Wilce in years.
Twelve letter men are certain of
being on the squad, with the possi-
bility that one or two more may join i Cross Country Manager Tryouts
before the season is under way.
Klee, Workman, star veterans, will ,Tryouts for Cross Countryj
have Dobebeit, who is touted as their manager may. report in lWater-
best bet, and Honnicker, who has been man gymnasium at 3 o'clock any
shifted from end, to round out the afternoon this week to the As-
backfield. Workman will again take sistant Manager.
care of the passing and kicking. ( ---____

If all students were given their
allotment of extra tickets the stands
would be more than filled by this
group. "Some have asked why extra
tickets are not alloted according to
class preference," said Iarry Tillot-
son, assistant director of intercol-
legiate athletics yesterday. "This
would be a physical impossibility. It
would require the services of many
more clerks than we can procure, and
more time than is available to carry
out the necessary filing of applica-
tions in order of classes. It is only
possible to give preference to upper-
classmen with regard to location of
seats.
Standmig Room Sdld
"As soon as we saw th4t the num-
ber of tickets way going, to be too
small we were forced to 'cut down
on the number of tickets sold to all
University groups. This necessarily
included the students. t The faculty
are worse off th'an the students since
they had only two days after their
ticket sale opened during which ex-
tra tickets could be granted. Stu-
dents had a week."
Out of the 3,500 standing room tick-
ets, the standing room capacity of
Ferry field, 1000 have been sent to
O.S.U. and more than 500 have been
sold by mail order to date. The re-
maining tickets are still on sale at
the Athletic office in the Press build-
ing.
Taranto, Sept. 26-(By A.P.)-The
cruiser San Marco has sailed for Cor-
fu, preparing for the evacuation of the
island by the Italians.
Freshmen Cross-Country Tryouts

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

WISCONSIN
6-Coe College.
13-Michigan Aggies.
20-Indian Aggies.

(I
f
I'
l
I
r !

All men who will try for the
freshmen cross-country team
should be at Waterman gym-
'nasium at 3 tomorrow after-
noon to meet Coach Ted Sullivan,
who will hold his inital confer-
ence with his pupils and take
them over the course around the
boulevard.

I.
,.1

rell has not as yet been notified of
the exact date.
At present the candidates are go-
ing through the preliminary work-]
outs. There will be no heavy work
for three weeks when the team will
fight between themselves for regu-
lar positions. Coach Farrell is op-
timistic and barring injuries or ill-
ness the team looks more promis-j
ing than any team of pre-seasowinake-
up that Michigan has had in years.

I
(;
f!
li
f
I
I'

TH E BUSY BEE
PASSES
WATCH, FOR (OW' EING
- OrF-
THE AROiR FOUNTAIN

i'

A

4

Twenty five men reported to Coach
Ted Sullivan for freshmen Cross
country yesterday afternoon, and
munch larger turnout is expected at
the next meeting, at 3 o'clock Friday
afternoon in Waterman gymnasium.
Here is an excellent opportunity
for freshmen to learn the essentials
of good cross-country running from
a competent coach. At the first turn-
out emphasis is laid on proper stride
and breathing on distance runs. The
candidate is then put through a short
practice run. ILong runs will not be
attempted until later when the men.
are in form.
All the men looked good in the{
practice and it is possible that therel
are several among them, and those
who will answer the call after they:
have settled themselves in the Uni-
versity, who will measure up to the
calibre of the present Varsity harrier
squad.
Coach Sullivan's plans for the next
two weeks call for light runs and jogs
in order to accustom the men tQ the'
course and to whip them into shape
for the more strenuous sessions which
will take place after cooler weather
comes.
Every man that has any ability or
possibilities for Cross Country should
see Coach Sullivan at 3 o'clock, Mon-
days, Wednesdays, and Fridays.

i'

DE1

PHOTOGRAPHER

We give the courteous consideration that our busi-
ness is, built on - with a guarantee that our work
pleases.
DEY portraits offer the right kindof best wishes
to your family and friends, especially at Christmas

time.

6

We would be glad to have you make an early ap-
pointment with us.

04P rFj gtutbtn

I

-

BOXING CLASSES

334 South State Street, Ann Arbor

Coach Sullivan has opened
classes in boxing in Waterman
gymnasium. All men who want
boxing instruction report to Ted
Sullivan, Waterman gymnasium.

PHONE 303-W

____________________________L I
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