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September 27, 1923 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TT'ThSAY, SIT-77F Y7iBER u'r1d93

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

PAGE

.rteAGE

HEATING TUNNEL WORK
DRAWS NEAR COMPLETION
ADDITION TO POWERHOUSE NOlI
WELL UNDER
WAY
Among the many important pieces
of work completed by the department
of Buildings and Grounds during the
summer, the construction of heating
tunnel extensions is outstanding. Ex-
cavation commenced shortly before
college closed last June, and the tun-
"nel is in such a state that heat and
electricity will be supplied to the two
buildings, Univers$ity High School and
the Engineering Shops, which will ac-
commodate classes for the first time
today.
East University Torn Up
The steam shovel started digging the
trench at Waterman gymnasium and
proceeded from there the width of the
c'mp proper to the corner of East
and South University avenues. Here
the turn ivas made and the first inter-i
''ference with traffic occurred. It was
necessary. during the progression of
the work to build a bridge to the eng-
ineering arch to accommodate pedes-
trains on the diagonal walk. From this
point the tunnel was carried down
South University avenue to a point op-
posite Tappan hall. Here an extension
is being carried under the street to the
new Law club.
After the steam shovel finished its
portion of tne work, concrete footings
were put in and the concrete wallsmand
ceilings put uh. The work on the main
line is now finished With the exception
of closing up some sections of the
ceiling, and filling in in some places.
Excavation has recently been started
on East University avenue for an ex-
tension leading to the site of the new
Medical building.
West Hall Pipe Closed.
Since the passing of West hall it has
been necessary to close up the pipe
leading to this structure and extend
the tunnel so as to provide heat for
the two dormitories on State street.
This work will be completed within a
short time.
Excavation for the addition to the
University power house is under way.
The foundations fori this building will
go down to nearly as great a depth as
those of the partially completed Phys-
ics building.
ALPHA NU TO HOLD
MEETING TONIGHT

Y

CHANGES IN COURSES
WILL BE MADE TODAY
Students desiring to change courses
in the literary college may do so to-
day and tomorrow at the registrar's
office in University hall, Only those
students who have legitimate excuses
for making changes in elections will
be allowed to do so without paying a
$1 fine, according to Registrar Arthur
G. Hall.
The places for making these changes
are as follows: Juniors and seniors
in Registrar Hall's office; freshmen
and sophomores in University Hall.
After this week all those who must
make changes must consult Dean Wil-
bur R. Humphreys and secure the
signatures of tlkir instructors.

Pharmics To Hold Assembly
All students in the College of Phar-
macy are invited to attend the assem-
bly at 7:30 o'clock this evening in
room 303 of the Chemistry building.
The meeting, which is to be merely a
get-together, will be a short one. The
members of the faculty of the college
will speak.
Dan
"Hey therel Aren't you a friend
of mine?"
Pythias-
"I certainly am. I'd do anything
In-theworld for you. Yes, any.
thing!"
Damox-
"All right-prove it! Give me back
that Eldorado pencil you borrowed
last night."
17 Itad--alldealers
................................... ....._....I
$1.00 or more
for your old.
pen in exchange -

THE ,BUSY BEE
PASSES
WATCH FOR OPENING
-- OF
THE ARBOR FOUNTAIN

Pekin, Sept. 26-(By A.P.)-The al for a surtax of 10 per cent on
Foreign Office hints there is no pros- customs, the excess to be contributed
pect of foreign approval of a propos- toward earthquakes in Japan.

I

IKE FISCH E R'S
ORCHESTRA
CLIFF BUEHRER, Ngr.
Phone 2523

y
ii
,,
I,,
{
Ik

SLEE P ANYWHERE, 11UT1
EAT AT REX'S
THE CLUB T.IUNCI
712 Arbor Street
Near State and Packard Streets

THE BUSY BEE
PASSES
WATCH FOR OPENING
-- OF-
THE ARBOR FOUNTAIN

I

W

~Whitney Theatre

i

I

, .
1
i
I
t
1

arm

i~thesV

FOR YOUNG MEI

FOR THREE NIGHTS COMMENCING

"Jimmie the adtaker" sells anything
quickly. -Adv.
::'11lIllllltllflililNltttttttlllNti
H EALTH
KEEP FIT IF YOU WISH TO
SUCCEED.
BE GOOD TO YOUR FEET.
- -
IRVING WARMOLTS
D. S.C.
CIRO1PODIST'
707 N. Univ. Ave. Ph. 2662
= IIIHtlllllllltllIIillIIIlliltlItIIllllit
FRES HM E N !

SATURDAY NIGHT,

SEPT. 29

I

MONDAY, OCT 1, TUESDAY, OCT. 2

*4~4 ~t~* r+I
~ ~ '-t
~ Q+

MICHIGAN REPERTORY THEATRE

for

any new

pen. Our stock

Presents the Three-Act Comedy

Here's some good advice.
If you want to have an easy
time your Sophomore, Junior,
and Senior years, make a hit
with the Profs your first term.

consists of:

I

1 -,

You

can do it if you turn out

I

neat Coronatyped notes, themes,
and reports. Now is the time
you need Corona, and we've got

one for you.

Waterman
Conklin
Sheaffer
Parker
Leloeuf
Moore
Dunn and

i

BOLLUSC
By HUBERT HENRY DAVIES

_,,,jaw
F ° r''

THE

Alpha Nu debating society will hold
its first regular meeting of'the year
at 7:30 tonight in the Alpha Nu room
on the fourth floor of University hall.
The, meeting will be opened by a
short talk on parliamentary law by E.
,. Cory, '26L. This will be followed
by a debate, thequestion for which
will be "Resolved, That the United
States should subsidize our merchant
marine." The affirmative will be up-
held by G. W. Bean, '24; J. J. Dunn,
'20; and #H. S. Hanson, '24. They will
be opposed by H. E. Souftrou, '24;
E. C. Prophet, '24; and Neil Steab-
ler, ,'26.
'.All persons interested in debating
are invited to attend this meeting.
There will be a business meeting, for
members only, after the adjournment
of the regular m eeting. s r
Two Astronomy Courses Dropped
Due to the departure of Prof. Wil-
liam J. Hussey, member of the as-
tronomy department and director of
the observatory, for South Africa for
further researches, two courses listed
in the astronomy section of the 1923-
24 announcements will be omitted this
semester. They are courses 5 and 14.
In addition courses 1 and 4 will not,
as is indicated in the announcements,
include a section under Professor
Hussey.
Engineer Classes Changed This Week
Engineering students will be able
to change their election of courses
throughout this week by consulting
their classifier. Beginning Monday
changes will have to be made through
the hours committee. Prof. T. B.
Runn ng, chairman, Frank R. Finche
and Orland W. Boston compose this
committee.

$50.00 for the latest model.
Easy terms if desired. Others
as low as $25.00.
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
The Typewriter and Stationery
Store
Typewriters of all makes
bought, sold, rented, exchanged,
cleaned and repaired.

MEMBERS', TICKETS EXCHANGED
AND PUBLIC SEAT SALE AT BOX
OFFICE THURSDAY AT 10 A. M.

Attention to Detail
A close examination of Fitform Clothes reveals the
fine hand tailoring of every minute detail- It is the
careful attention to small things that make the whole
perfect.
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
$40.$45 $50
See Our Windows
at
116 EAST LIBERTY

others

O D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
The Typewriter and
Stationery Store
"i"""~~, .~~.u" as""............. ".u.

Prices $ .77 $1.00 $1.50 ALL
Tax .08 .10 15 SEATS
Total. 75 1.10 1.65 RESERVED

11

ILoCobt

J

UumSU..a..*.dUUUW UUP~b ~ *I~h nookb.-W_.
a1nnouncing

FA

r

!'

- CONCERTS

Jewelry

The FRATERNITY Shops
A System of designing, Making
and Distributing College and
Fraternity Merchandise.

HILL AIJDITORIUM, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

Stationery
Engraving

8 P. M. EASTERN TIME

Dance Programs
Greeting Cards
Favors and

Cordially,
KENITH G. STRUNK
Hermtage House
Phone 595

EARL

V. MOORE, Musical Director

Novelties
Main Office
Fourteen West Washington Street
Chicago
*PqI~m p~q~mp..qmgPapUSUUau...
- -U~m - e N

cIT urtal n i (Cu erts
October 19-AMELITA GALLI-CURCI, Soprano '
November 5-VLADIMIR DE PACHMANN, Pianist
November 22-COSI FAN TUTTE OPERA COMPANY
December 12-EFREM ZIMBALIST, Violinist
January 25-FEODOR OHALIAPIN, Bass

E~xtra (lhurrt J'grigii

October 22-SOUSA'S BAND
100 Players

November

i

December

12-DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
OssIP GABRILOWITSCH, Conductor;
MICHAEL PRESS, Violinist.
4-DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
VICTOR KOLAR, Conducting;
RICHARD CROOKS, Tenor.

Fr-eshmen

February

11-ERNO DONNANYI, Pianist

I

I

LEARN MICHIGAN'S FAMOUS SONGS.
GET THE MUSIC AS WELL AS THE WORDS.
BE A MICHIGAN MAN FROM THE START.
KNOW "THE VICTORS," "THE YELLOW
AND BLUE," "VARSITY" AND OTHERS.

COURSE TICKETS
$7.00-Patron's Tickets. (Holder has privilege of retaining
same location successive seasons.) Three center
sections on both Main Floor and in First Balcony,
front to rear.
$6.00-Two side sections on both Main Floor and in First
Balcony, front to rear.

January 22-DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
VICTOR KOLAR, Conducting;
ARTHUR SHATTUCK, Pianist.
February 18-MR. AND MRS. JOSEF LHEVINNE
Pianists
COURSE TICKETS
$5.00-Three center sections on both Main Floor and in
First Balcony, front to rear.
$4.00-Two side sections on both Main Floor and in First
Balcony, front to rear.
$3.00-Eight Rows in Second Balcony.
$2.00-Last Fifteen Rows in Second Balcony.

$5.50-Sixtxeen rows in Second Balcony.
$5.00-Last seven rows in Second Balcony.

1 1

Get These at The

E

U ~Should anv Section be oversr ~ibved. ~~remaining rderrs will he filler]

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