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November 03, 1923 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-11-03

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_fHE, MICHIGAN ".DAILY:' h_ __'_

[A lIE1WSEAPER OF THE
NVERSITY OF -[XCIGA IN
ied every morning except Mondayf
e University year by the '3oard in
of Student Publications.
:rs of Western. Conference Editorial
on.
kssociated Press., ,s exclusively en-
the use for republication of all news
's cre~ited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news pub-
!eremn.
d at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
ias second class matter.
iption by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
:Ann Arbor Press Building, 1$,ay-
cet.
communications, not exceeding 340
roil] he published in .The Daily 5t'
-etion of the E'ditor. Upon requEst,
tity of communicants will be re-
is confidential.
EDITORIAL STAFF
lepiones, .2414 app -176-M~
MANAGING EDITOR
HlOWARD' A. DONAHIUE
ditor..............Julian E. =Mack
itvr...........Harry Jioey
L'oard Chairman.... R. C. Moriarty,
Night Editars
iles A;: 3. ormable
Clark J. . rlinghouse
P.M. Wagnier
;ditor....... ...Ralph N. Byers
Editc ............ Winona Hibba'rd
h Editor............ . R. B.'Tara'
Magzine 'Editor......L. Tildeni
;ditor'. ..... Ruth A Howell
City 1Editor..Kenneth .C. 'Kellar:
Editorial Board
stein Roltei.t Ransay:'
Andrew Propper
Assistants
aeteke fJ. .McGinnis
Barlow L.S5. Mansfield
kmnan Ei. C. .Mack
rown Verena Nforan
to Cote Regina' Reichman
ravis S. L. Sih
Ehrlich W. IL. Stonieman
inerle H. R. Stolle
enry K. $. Styer
Kamin N. R. Thal
riger S. B3. T'rembler
i Liehermnan W. J. Widthour
cGregor, Jr.
BUSINESS STAFFE
BUSINESS MANARR
LAURENCE H. FVROT
ng..... ..... . unnt"
ig ................ Perry M. Ilaydem
ng.......................... C. Ptir'd)!
ng...................... . W. Roessex'
nig ....... ........... . I Schere'.,
..............'C. W/, Chr~istji('
..... ..Jno. Haskin f,
on .....awrence 'Pierc,,
Assistants
:aplan .Warql1"d A. Marks,
lin Dyron Parkerr
Crouch 'S. A. Robinson
DJexter If. M. Rockwell
FFinn H. E. Rose
. [ox Will Weise
11lit C. P, -White
,wkinson R. C. Winter
lo edemaker

against the organization. But now the
K lan is breaking into the. M ost highly ; Ded c t d a d nig e ed ir l s ntR
the country. a.k }.

IEDITORIAL COMMENT I
SiThniVEMini)

Alma college, an institution spon-
sored .by the ,klan, as established. t-
self in New Jersey, just a short di-t
tance from Princeton. Its president,:
*1lma ;white,- in a ;eet iWterview
for the Princetonian, expressed great
confidence that the principles of the
,1t1 n which till now have only been
embraced by the uneducated would
now. make great strides in the unier-
sities ;of the country and draw over, to
thteir side large numbers of the Btu-1
dent bodies.. At Harvard, two un-
dred students are said to be enrolled
already.
The foundation of our democracy
has. been threatened from time to time
i ;the past by natin-wide move-
mpents but the sane larger portion of
American citizens has always acted
as a bulwark upon which these move-
ments broke without doing any last-'
lng""damage The"American college
student belongs by right among the
citizens who form that bulwark. His
training should . prepare him to look
squarely at questions like those of the
Ku Klux Klan and decide them fairly
on- the basis of their merits and wth-
out emotion.
The Ku Klux Klan is founded on a
li.Its originators, while claiming to
uphold the democracy on paper, vio-
lated that delaration in principle
w~hen they used illegal means to pro-
mote their schemes.
%onsiderations of this kind determn
Dine on which side of the question per-
0ons ,f. Iptelji~ence willpae thm-
s lves. Wlleter Amrcan uniersit
'tu 94tswill be placed .in .the ia-
telliget groutp remains .to be .seen
It tsiteresti~g to nte, lowever,tha
the greatest -clege 'Ku lux Klan
"urore fet. o r.om;es fromtwo
eaetern }uive rsit t s, iHar.ad ad
Princeton .
tr. Paul lnspar, iocialit lead-
Er, ,". Gturer, anXd author, addresse
Lhe studtent .id 4Y qf assahusets n-
titue of -.~e nlog.y 3n te 7i{ldlng
of te institute -last Mnday aftr-
noon. M4r. lanshrd, a ccrdi1A, o te
sch99ol paper, spoke on c'. io C .l
nentge of Labr to ,the .ollege Man,
,tni ; handlled;;jis subet from a "rd-
ca." :s tndoit.
Wh'len' N 1 Ban41hrd fiished his
'alk ,to the Tech tudtent, the satu-
leats, without dlou~t, knew .somelthing
about Social ism -but no .later sus
',f the paper indticated that the morale
1V the school was injutire :to any ema-
i et by the talk gien. The admi-
stratlon of the Massachusetts 1ma1-
.umte of Technology believes the stu-
lent body' should know -about qlues-
': ons .of that kind and offered no .re-
tritibns, to .a speakr, however rd-
"'amaking a speech before an audi-
%ce of well-balaned students.
tThe °liberal -attitude of the school
43uithorties is an al-too-rare one, how-
=ver, even in .instttiops of higher
-.earnin 9, but it is a broadminded pl-'
,cy :thast desrves ,enuton.
"Our first and fundamental maxim
;should be never to entangle ourselves
;-m the broils of Europe. Our second
;aever -to suffer Europe to iitermedle
'with .cis-Atlant-ic affairs."==-Tll aWs *
efterson.
,z.England might better have spared .a
,greater man' than Adrew 1$oar Law
i f she could have =found one.
T'wenty-Five Years °
Ago411t ichigan
From- the- fils, of the V. of N.L aly, I
' No. 3 89

Ryan, Northw~estern's end whoha
,,been inp Ann. Arbor ;for 'a day QT tWO<
;urying Michigan's tactics, stated _t.
,a Dily representao~ve'last night t44tt
.Michigan ought :to beat :Chlc9,go'
;Thanksgiving day if she uses the
proper tactics on Chicago.
Prof. Thomas C. Trueb'lood is edit-
'-lg thbe report of, the proceedings of
Athpe:National Association ,of. Pocutlon-
ists held atCincinati lastJunve. Prot..
Trueblood who was president, at the,
~Cincinnatf.' meeting :was reelected pres-
*dent.
The freshmen tii year have an
abundance of artistic ability in their'
'class, as is shown by the increasing
number of signs on the caIrnpua set-
,ting forth the claims Of the. rival canl-
.didate~s for presidency. -This is a new.
;feature in freshman elections, advert-
; iing the~m like footbal ams Form-
,erly it has been the plan to 'wait till
te clas meeting and then win oever
the wavering ones by 'an explosion of
pyrothecnical oratory.

j COLLEGIATE EPIC
I glimpsed a pretty maiden
IStrolling down the street;
The very way -she wore her hat
Proclaimed her most discreet.
Hger graceful arms, l-ike trailing
tulle,
Hung limply at her side..
B1ehind her hair, like bashful
stars,
I saw her :two eyes hide.
',Who is that pretty ,maiden ?"
I asked ,a :Pgassing Man.
"I do not know," lie answered,
"But find out soon I can.
"For I am here in college-
'eall are here, -,you see.
We all are here together--
As friendly as can be."
Wherewith he raised his soft felt
hat,
And bowed in college form;
"Beg pardon," he said politely,
"But aren't you from ;the dorm?
"We all .are here in college-
I'm .sure I've seen your face-
Do yolu :ever ,go to Granger's?
P ypu set a red-hot pace ?" ,
The pretty maiden -halted;
'-, ace itup with .joy:
"Ai-n't you the cutest bunny,
And such _a pretty boy-
"No, I ain't here in college,
But I'm friendly jus- the same--
I Work ,in .a ;down-town .laundry;
White Swan Is the. name.
"And any ,time you'd like a date,
:lust ring me on thie phone.
Pa and Ma is always out--
And ;I am there alone."

Indian Summuer
Seasons mean a lot to pJhotograpy.
Take advantage of your Kodakdwring
this time of the Indian paint bru h.

A few people, having read the editor-j
ial hastily, we presum~e, have mistaken
.thec attitude of TheDaily Illini toward
the shooting of Philip H. Sharp.
The, Illini does not .qo doae tulevery.
Not so at all. We have no use for
thieves whatsoever We wish to point

;'

Lyndoni & CGe
7'19 N university

out that the Illini has often urged a
more stringent enforcement of law
against student offenders wherever
they are caught in a violation. -Again
and again the Illini has urged that
all sneak thieves caught in Armory
and the Gymnasium and -elsewhere,f
be drastically punished. It -has stood
for law enforcement.
The Illini editorial' on Sunday made
two point only:
First, vhen the thievery, at worst
was not great, when the officer knew
that the thieves were very young, one
of them a University student, when
the officer abandoned. all opportunity
for the future identification -of .either
the car or the offenders, when -the,
opportunity for rounding, up the de-
ceased without resort to :firearms 'was
extraordinarily great--when all, of the
above seems to have :been, true, not
to mention the fact, of danger to others,
then for the officer to begin shooting
.at a murderously ,close ;range was a
bit of sheer .idiocy.
Second :for the police 'djepartment to
employ a 23 year old youth, with .no
previous police experience and.no po-
lice training, and the~n put' into his
hand the means of death, seems--to
say the least-a trifle trustful.
We do not condone thievery,
I BETTJING ANNO LOTALTY
(The Daily Illini)
No practice is more uinive~rsally con-
demned by faculty and,athletic .author-
ities toin the practice of student
betting.
I'Coaches point out that 'the practice
has a demoraiin.effect -on -the game,
it self, and administrators .like Presi-
dent Kinley are united in condemna-
tion of serious moral evils arising with,
its advent.
It is shown repeatedly that students
very seldom bet their own money,
that they tend -to becomle more and
more mnercenary as the~ practice is
continued.
John L. Griffith, Western: Conference
Director of .Athletics, urges these con-
siderations .on the directors of all
conference schools.

I ~.IItlIIIIIUIIIII1;tI;IIIIIIIIII;IIIIIhIIIIIIIIIIJjlljIIIiI

DETROIT UNITED LINES
EAST JBOUN{D
Limiteds : 6 a. in., 9:10 a. m. and
every two hours to 9:10 p. mn.
Express : 7 a. mn., 8 aim. and. every
two hours to 8 p. i..
Locals: 7 a. mn., 8:55 a. in. and
every .;two hours to 8:55m i.
11 p m. To Ypsilanti only. 11:40
p. mn., 12:25 a. in. and 1:15 a. mn.
WEST BOUND
Limited s : S:47,1a. mn. and ;every two
hours ,to 8:47 ,p.' m.
Express (making loical stops) : 9:50
a. mn. and eery two 'houri to 9:,50
p.' m.
,Locals: 7:50, a. mn., 12:10 a. Mn.
ADRIAN-ANT ARBOR BUS JANE
Central Time ,(Slow Time)}
Leave. Chambier of Commerce
-Week Days .Suno~,ays
6:45ai.m. 6:45 °a. M
12:45 P. m;. 645 P. '
'A S. H. ELLIOTT, Proprietor
Phone 9256-M_ Adrian, Mich.
AR Il hts .60t$15
PA RCK s:. Mt. ~ o $1.5
SECOND AND LAST WEEK OF
Thie Great American Thrillodrama
"WHISPERING WIRES'
N~ew York Cast :and Production
4Thousand volts of Laughs and Jolts
N~ext Week- 11,P SHE GOES"
Phone 26,4E'
1IRVING WARIOLTS, PP. S. C.
ad OTHOPODIST
;v 707 N. Ijniverstyj

' 1 r r rl=l r r lt l l r r l ~ l r l ll r l l l l i 1 r t
TI"he Blue
r ~CIGAR Sr
i A COMPLET
igarettes and I
Gilberts e'&'Park and I
W. D. C. Milano Pipes (F
Stationery, Maga;
General Student*'
CORNER STATE AND F
:ErrrrrrrrIru.rinrrru ujurr~r

!'rmt
TORE

"E LINE.
Tiobagcos"
rjiforo's ,Cand
From .5Qc to$5'
zines,en
i, Suppjje s
?ACKA&D ,TRI

.l
..' *
ii
T A '
1 .
1 "
'"A I

TS

False Economy
The.uality of p~efu
should 'never be 1owered.
The gu idec post Ofv.,
succesul business outl~es
this. Bke it diff ere t uad
it is false econoni.
Van's un
1116 SOUJTH UNIVER y
Meet and :.Ea~t at, Vn's

}.

T1JRDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1923
Editor-RAY BILLINGTON
NDING CAMPUS DRAMATIC,
TALENT
ana university is nw bewaihingr
ethod, long prevalent at that Ii
ion, of selecting students to fill~i
in all campus dramatic produc-
only from students who have"
a name for themselves in prey-
roductions. Accordng to an ed-
Lin The Indiana Daily Student.'
iethod leads to a restricted numfi'
Af students playing the parts.
and over again in spite of the;
.hat the audiences are well ac-'
ed with their work and would
o see new material used.
e method of. bringing the latent;
on the Indiana campus to the~
ion of the directors of -the dra-
productions is sought by the,
a newspa-per. No suggestion of~
iethod. to be used is made, a1=~
hi similiar ideas have been -put'
ractice at other universities.
e at Michigan, Mimes has st-
a method ;of grouip compettii~on,
aternities and other organiza-
and has offerted a cup -to the,
presenting the best production.1,
,en on the campus, almost :with-
ception, are eligible to enter-this
;t from which good material is
taken to be'- used -in Mimes pro-
dramatic competition was be-,
ast year. From last' year's -con-,
s many as ten prospects for this,
opera were foun~d anud giyen1
ts. The plan proved popular'
both the individuials and the,
s and, although only about seven':
s entered the first contest, the
d, which took place in the
~brought more than ten f~r-
Mimes is repeating their tourn-,
is year- although the date is as
definite..
3 method has solved,,:in. ,a large
re, the problems that Michigan
in locating imw' dramatic talent
ecampus ad might be of some
.e to IndianIa if tried there.
E FIERY CROSS ON{ A NE« -
MOUNITAIN-
ivities of thle Ku Klux Klan; On-
ling upon: the "centers of in-
,ualism. asnumanvonsiderithei

"Thank you," he said, and lit ,his
pipe ;I
Your name's not hard to guess -
I see it in your tailored hat,
And -in -your dizzy dress."
"My name is elegant and grand,
She hIastened to ,aver.
"Ev'rybody knows: it'sMis
"is.mtake!" lhe finished it for her.
x. 1K..
The Chief coimes in yesterday morn-I
ing and says: to us, "say, what is this
house of Dediliphus, anyhow?" And
ve :said ,that it was a classical poem,
very swell and intellectual, and not
for the hot polloi. And he says oh he
say, "I thought it was some kind of
a crack at -the football team," he
says.
TIE HOUS1I THAT D.NEj)A .US
AA Braalifat Serial
This is Thieseus who ledi the band
That came from Athenls afar to the
t f the mxaiden so youthfiul 'andl win-f
1 soipely fair
Who knew how to salve the tortuous
lair
Where -boys and girls from Athens
saw
.A subway entrance In the jaws
Of the heartless creature, bhuge andI
dread.
With b6dy, of man and fierce :bull's
'head
That dwelt in the Cretan labyrinth.j
(To be continued)
ARISTOPHANES
America, as many people 'have ob-
served, is become a nation. of weeks
and days: -Constitution Week, Navy
Day, Save the Babies Week, Plant al
Tree Week, Pure Food Week, %Zeep
;Clean Week, Dollar Day, Arbor Day-
And nqw, from a company that
makes castor oil and other drugs,
comes am ,announcement that Squibb
Week starts today. Here, noaw' is
something -to rejoice about.

,I

Mi'

A

Make Marine ReservlitIoila

'i I'
'5 -

YESTERDAY

I

I

I'

IrAm

I

Attenipts At C1r1icA#9#
ISociety is often illusive. To :the;
average man the present oirder ap-t
pears with, its, customs rooted,, institu-
tions rigid, and, laws. fxed anid' he Is'
naturally led to believe that such is'
the immutable nature':of laws, mis-
tom's, and institutions; in other wo~rds'
, that laws make, the world and not:
'the :world makes the laws.
In the course .of .time, an old law;
or a long cherished idlea runs the'
risk of becoming, rusty and meaning-
; less. Such, we fear,, has hrappenied to
. the theory of ="liberty." In the course!
of our experimenting with democracy
and democratic paternalism,; ideas,
about liberty have become somewhat'
1muddled and reclarifteation of the>
popular xnind has become more or less
of a necessity. By way of presenting:
a few defiAte propositions for consid-
eration, we quote Franklin 14. mid-'

EATS

., is-
6
.
sa
}

EATSI

We have no special dishes - each dish' is a

Gooked to please .and

satisfy you.

Everything when you want it at a price you*w I be pleased 'to :pay
Come in and try some of our deliciously cooked food-You'll like it.'

.._t x

'
ikr

" ,JiJ

Ben Hecht, of Chicago, says he1
wrote hit new hock in ten ho9urs.
It is a full-sized adventure story, and;
bas the .fetching title of "The Floren-
tine Dagger. " If it has, say, 60,000
words, which is a fair average, Mr.;
Hlech must have written 100 words a
iute; and while we are fr from
doubting his brilliant achjeveme#, we
must say that we het th.e book is just,
,ikthFodthtHerasebein%20 seconds; for the benefit of visitingj
notables-not worth $2.00.

dings in the Independen13t:
"I.I republics and democracies'
laws 'hudbe proposed, urged and.
voted for only by citzen s who 4n~r-
ab ly expect to obey .them.
II. In republics and democracies;
laws can be enforced against. the ,dis-
obedientonly .by. majorites- that are:
themselves law-abiding.
II. In republics and democracie the,
vital moral interests of mntikind. re
best safeguarded and furthered if, in
the main and as far as possible, they:
are controlled and 'regulated by.,pri-
vate cohscience and public opinion
rather than by legislative bodies and,
adminigtrative agents.
IV. Inr epulblics and democracies
law and governmnent a.re crea.ted and.
must be sustained by the initiative
and responsibility, of individual citi-
zens, and, these cannot exist' apart
from individual liberty.
IV. In republics and democracies,'
therefore, individual hibcrty should be
curtailed only as far as public safety,
and public order clearly, and beyond
reasonable doubt require."
The last of these propositions is the
keynote of liberalism. No gn n

'4
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PolL~tl'e.aS opJUST BACK OF HILL AUDITORIUM ON THAYF,

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tI1I1111fill 1111IllHIIliIliIIItMtill ItiI lIll IIIll Ill III Ill Ill

PAL
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OSWALD A. HERZ

NTING AND DECORATING

^ . '~

A COMPLETE LINE, Of

}
£
R

A faculty memrber told one of
;the Daily night editors recently that
~he thought the D)aijy had 'improved a
great deal; but added that he thought
the Toasted Rolls column showed a
'lamentable tendency toward levity.
Wlhen this rnn'o'.'r nv or. 'nnnd to +

IMPORLTED AND DOMESTIC.
WALL PAPER

Thp Women's League held its flrst
renxilar me~tht ii ofthe year, Saturday

II

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