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October 28, 1923 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1923-10-28

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op

Section
Two

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73att

Section
Two

VOL. XXXIV. NO. 31.

PRICE, FIVE CENTS

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, 2UNDAY. OCTOBER 2S, 1923

If STUDENTS WANT
SPECIAL TO IflWAl
ONLY TWENTY HAVE SIGNED)
FOR RESERVATIONS
ON TRAIN
ACCOMMODATIONS ARE
OBTAINABLE AT UNION
Reservations On Wisconsin '.rain
Being Taken Now by Dennis
Donovan
Students signifying their intention
of making the trip to the Iowa game
on the special train sanctioned by the
Union have so far reached less than
20 only a small number, according to
Dennis Donovan, house manager off

Wisconsin Route
Given By Bureau
For the benefit of those who con-j
template driving to the Wisconsin-j
Michigan football game the Road and !
Travel bureau of the Madison Associa-
tion of Commerce has investigated the'
numerous possible routes and ree-
ommends the following: Leave Ann 1
Arbor following highway 17 to Water-{
vliet; from Watervliet to MichiganI
City on highway 11; from Michigan
City to Chicago on the Dunes road;
from Chicago to Rockford on high-
way 5; route 2 from Rockford to Be-!
lit, and Wisconsin's trunk line 10 to
Madison.
COU*'MMITTEE 1L
FOSTER ATHLETIC"S;
Union Makes Special, Arrangements
.With Intramural
I)eparttent

1-

PROPOSED LEAGUE BUILDING

Antique DuellinJ
Weapon Unearthed
While wat hin g a ditching iachine
at work in th osoutheast district o
throw uponwer aIe new uiir. on i v IE P DG A
being prepared, J. 1'. Stevens, a .local
contractor, noticad an unusual objeEt
thrown upon a idcge rat dirt. IHe to y-_
ed it into his maichiine a:nd for of it for V1S~iD OA ION WILL EMBODY
the tihe bein ;. Later, upon exam- ViEU R,'11 R W iLTTEN BBY
ining it with the aid of am ice-pik
and a pan of gasoline he found it to
be a bmuzzle-loading (luelling pistol
of the percussion cap type. The wal- NEW SPANISH DANCES
nut stock i badly rtot edand the ba r- WILL BE INTERPRETED
rel choked with i ust, but the Iharts_____
are all intact.
The hammer is a cumbersome scroll Aeeessary Artistic Novelties Brought
which protrudes fully an inch above Mack From Europe By
the barrel. It is placed over the side Ted Shawn
of the barrel and the sights are Close
beside it. The weapon is loaded by When Ruth St. Denis and Ted
ramming a charge of powder into the Shawn, with their company of artistic
muzzle and wadding it in. The gun dancers appear here on Monday eve-
could be dissembled lby putting it into ning, Nov. 26, in Hill auditorium, their
a vice and applying a wrench. ''le program will embody music composed
barrel is shaped hexagonally, permit- by American writers in an effort to
ting the use of these tools. shoAw that the dance art is independent
According to Dr. 0. V. Stephenson of foreign influence and to prove to
of the history, department the giunis the public that American composers
of the type used by Aaron Burr in his can furnish the needed musical ac-
duel with Hamilton. Strangely it was 'ompaniments. Five of the six num-
unearthed in a territory which only bers into which the new program is
T,( Alumnae 'afew years ago was covered by water divided will be performed to the mu-
TI~e Alum a cid since then there have been no Aircacofloewhete
ie of American composers, while the

the Union. Unless a decided influx
in the number making the trip occurs FRESHMAN ACTIVITIES BO)DY j
the train will not be run and the spe- PLANS FOR ALL FORlS OF SPORTS
cial rates will be withdrawn. ---= " :.:..>* :
Band to Make Trip Athletic activity among the fresh-
Although only a small number havej men will be fostered by the newi
Althughonl a mal nubeihav menwil befosere bythenew The .above cut represents the talk- f5 hours credit in the University is
made reservations for the trip, the ad- Freshman Activities committee of the Til bo ct Uersts t Mtak- g5 hour ep in the Uirti
ditional 75 men that the band will Union through a special arrangement ing playns for the University of Michi- ,eigible for memership in the
carry to the game will go largely to with the Intramural department ar- gan Laguie BuiLdng, for which )both League; the fee of $50 is payable in
the making up of the special, accord- ranged by the Union. All forms of u2ndergrdiuuates and alumnae of the in five installmentiy Up to this time
ing to Donovan. Approximately 100 sports will be carded for by the coni- iversity will conduct intensive cam- mount of money pledgch ed for sub-
Uniersty illconuc inensve ilm iscrilptions has reached $100,000, over
more students are thus needed to as- mittee. - aI
sure the running of the special. Class to be Dlvided -payns this year. The building is to 50 per cent of which has been actual-
Representatives from the railroad It is the plan of the Union to divide sittd the bounded The total of money at the under-
company which will run the train: will the entire freshman class into tenINorth Univrsity aveue, Twelfth andg
compny un i~6Lniemitjgraduates have turned in according to,
arrive in Ann Arbor to exchange-re- groups of approximately 100 students Washington streets and the Mall, pro- a recent report, is $16,375. During
ceipts of payment for tickets Wednes- arranged geographically in regard to vided that the sum of $5,000,000 will 1922-23 a total of $7,875 was added to
(jay if sufficient students have signed their location in Ann Arbor. These be available by June 1926, so that the fund by those students who gave'
at this time. Those intending to make groups will hold regular meetings building operations may commence at numerous benefits of various kinds to
the trip must make their reservations headed by an upper classman. 'T eams that time. Such an important site raise the money. They will carry out
before this time or the privileges of from these groups will carry on inter- cannot remain undeveloped longer several large projects for the same
the special will be withdrawn. group competition in all branches of an that. Tis amount must be se- purpose this year, the most important
R1ake R~eservaions at Union 'sports.
!Reservations t tri y ors. wcured by life memberships and dona- of which is the annual bazaar which
Reservations far the trip may be; Two freshmen will be chosen from ;lions. Every wonman who ha. earned will be given December 7 and 8 inI1
made with Dennis Donovan at his each group to manage first and sec- t
office in the Union. Payment of the and teams that will be selected in
round trip fare must be made at the each group in each sport. No two I 9
time and the student will be given a j men will be allowed to manage more(1
receipt that will entitle him to a ticket than one team. Through a special I
when the representatives of the com- arrangement with the itraiural de-
pany arrive. Pullman, reservations partment 1927 numerals will be given NE
may be made with the agent at an add- to the managers of the winning ,teams
ed price ar the Iowa special aro a l wr tling, btoig, crohots Several unique features in construe-
as follows:. Round trip fare, $20.30; country, bowling, out door and indoor tion and arrangement are being in Teddy's Birthplace Made Center For
lower berth each direction, $5.36; up- baseball, swimming, and a limited stalled in the new Literary building. Promulgation of
per berth each direction, $4.50. number of other sports will be carried There will be a lobby on the main is Ideas
Few Sign to go to Wisconsin on in competition between the groups. floor in which students may gather
Reservations for the Wisconsin Winners to be Given Trophys fonwst cy tdenassms the r
special that will run on November 17 ' Arrangements are being formulated and study between classes. The plans PRE TIDENT' A RE
are also being taken by Donovan. Al- through which the members of the 1 for the interior finish of this room AT EDICATIONiCEREMONY
though the number of students sign- winning teams will be given trophys have not been decided upon as yet. NewYorkOct.2 -(AIP.)-Presi-'
ing for this special has been small, it or some other suitable award. A cup There are two methods outstanding
is expected by Donovan that the early to the winning teams or individual . dent CalvTsCoolidge's tribute to 'Iheo-
date is the cause and that more will medals to the members of the team at the present, which are to finish the (le Calvin l es trm o Teo-
later sign for the trip. are being considered by the commit- ! lobby entirely in marble or in wood- (lore tosvy in the form on
was read today at the dedication of
The rates for this special are as tee. work with a marble floor. Swinging Roosevelt House, No. 28 East 20th
follows: Round trip fare, $15.16; low- It is also the plan of the committee doors are to be installed at all the en- Street,,by Mrs. John Henry Hammond,
er berth each direction, $4.50; upper to stage an indoor track meet some trances of the lobby, president of the Woman's Roosevelt
berth each direction, $3.00. time during the winter for all mem-t
bers of the freshman class in the Another feature is the installing of Memorial Association. P r e s i d e n t,
groups. First year men who are able two telescopes on the top floor. The ! Coolidge's letter was as follows:
to take part in such an eyent are re- two apertures left in the roof are 22 "It is a source of deep regret that
iquested to start work in the gym- .. it is impossible for me to take part
T E TER Snasum as soon as possibleetacss and a el se WillBe m in persoln in the dedication of Roose--
It is pointed out by the committee stalled under each onl(. The 'domles volt House. On a previous occasion
that the coaches of the Varsity teams which are to coven the 'scopes will I indicated my deep interest in the
will give special attention to the com- be 22 feet in diameter and 7 feet hig.h. project now happily completed. The
Arcade Ipetition among the teams in select- This will render the contour of the Womsn's Roosevelt Memorial Asso-

Barbour gynmnrasium:
A~ iti: will i

ssocIa an wli W1l gn Ian a tCLI Ve rve NV
on February 1, 192 -.
The architects for the building are
Pond and Pond, who have made plans
for several ofhher buildings on the;
M %ichigan campus.
The League will serve the inder-
graduate women as a center for their
activities and will contain organiza-
tion rooms, halls and a spacious audi-
torium to meet these purposeT. The
building will also be a meeting place
for alumnae and sleeping rooms willI
be providel for their use. It is also
planned that the Ann Arbor associa-
tion of Ulniversity women and similar1
organizations will be privileged to useC
the building.

nouses there,

sicGA. FURNISHI
Fills Calls for Talkers at
Father and Son
ain quets
PERRY HAYDEN HEADS Ff
MAN EXTENS1ON COM

- I Through the agency of the
1extension service calls that a
Observe Oct. 27 recived in increainsg num
Lane Hall asking for speak
A s "N avy D ay "occasions at Athletic banquets
and-son banquets and the like
ing filled. The extension serv
Observance of October 27 each year mitte which consists of Perry
as "Navy Day" began three years ago, '25, chairman and Arthur B
and will continue to , be celebrated '26, Charles Iligley, '26, and
with appropriate functions in the fu- sCross, 25, after filing these c
ture. This date was chosen because send out men prominent in
it was E-President Theodore Roose- activities to talk.
velt's birthday, in deference to the Bannister has charge of
fact that he was the .sponsor of our men out and answering all ca
present day navy, and has probablyj ing through the office for
done more than any other one person speak in churches and before
in the history of our country for the ings of a religious nature. C
betterment of that branch of the ser- charge of answering letters a
vice, for student speakers for sch
_othereducational meetings.
department is that of the Cc
clubs,and other like organiza
1.M. C. A. groups, Boy Scou
ings, and the lihc.
IN USH R $ About .1,000 Letters to be '
N Dore than 1000 letters will b
this week throughout the
SPEAKS BEFORE SYDNEY MEET- prominent men infonm~ing ti
ING OF P AN-PACIFI' this enlarged service. Exp
C1)N(GRlESS the speaker is to be paid byt
visited, the S. C. A. deriving
Necessity for cooperation among the for rendering this service.
nations of the world in sCieniicnd 1 The church deputation w

A lltic,
)UII-
il [lITEE
S. C. A.,
re being
obers at
kdrs for
, Father-I
e are be-
ice com-
Hayden,
annister,
I Robert
alls will
campus
sendingI
ills com-
men to
gather-
mos, has
nd call:;
L{ "ls and
Iligley's
attons as
t gather-
Railed
e miailed
state to
hem of
nsems6f
the town
no profit
hich haaC

sixth number, although founded on
Spanish themes, has been arranged
by their own musical director, Mr.
Louis Horst. The new scores which
the company will use in their visualiz-
ataons are even more musical than the
ones used last year, and are expected
to contribute the necessary musical
background for a successful year.
Local Color Added
At the close of last year's concert
season Ted Shawn left immediately
for Europe where he searched foriart-
istic novelties and touring through
Spain has succeeded in obtaining
many shawls, costumed oriental jew-
elry, and musical instruments, 'which
it is hoped will add local colorof the
coming season's program. While Ted
Shawn, lenhusband, has been search-.
ing foreign colorings,, Miss Dents has
been working strenuously at thd New
York Denishawn headquarters, work-
ing out with scenic experts her ideas
for new settings, designing, and sup-
ervising the execution of costumes and
properties, and in training the mem-
bers of, her company in the new dan-
es. After six months of study and re-
search, and another six months of
putting the'results of their study into
practice, the Denishawn dancers will
endeavor this year to win more praise
as the foremost exponent of their art
in America.
Cadman, the American composer
and arranger of Indian melodies, has
wrtten the score for Mr. Shawn's
""Feather of the Dawn", which he
founded on a Hopi Indian Legend.
This dance number will be one of the
features of the program. After hav-
ing visualized most of the famous for-
eign classic composers, Miss St. Denis
has selected this season the Sonata
klra gia., March -Wind, and 1iIgaudon
by the American composer, MacDow-
ell. These intrepretations will form
the opening number of the program,
Tihedmes Selected from Nature
One of themost interesting features
of last season's program of the Deni-
shawn company was the. Spanish
Suite. This year's program will con-
gain an entirely new Spanish number
entitled "Cuadro Flamencoc", which
in addition to displaying the art of
l!iss St. -Denis and Mr. Shawh will
give them an opportunity to use sev-
eral elaborate Spanish shawls which
Mr. Shawn bought for that purpose
Otbmi Spain last summer. The music
themes which lie also selected from
1 native melodies have been arranged
by Mr. Louis lorst. The action of the
dance takes place on the day of the
great bull fight, and the scene is laid
in a concert cafe, hall in Seville.
Many noteworthy critics are firm
in their belief that the penishawn
artists have elevated dancing to its
proper place as one of the funda-
mental fine arts. Mr. Shawn has been
invited to lecture at the .University
of Minnesota, the University of Texas,
The ?'roebel League of New York, the
Three Arts Club, all the high schools
in St. Paul, Omaha, and other leading
cities. When the University of Cali
fornia decided to permit dancing in its

Lois Wilson, featured player in ing material for the teams. The
"Ruggles of Red Gap" which comes to J chances offered in this work for all
the Arcade Theatre today for a week's freshmen interested in athletics to
engagement, in the role of Kate Ken- develop is stressed by the committee.
ner gracefully ascends the social lad- New Committee
der from saloon-keeper's daughter to The Freshman Activities committee
British aristocracy, of the Union is a new department re-
The story of "Ruggles of Red Gap" cently inaugurated by the Union. It
Tells of the troubles of rival coteries is headed by Franklin Smith, '25, as-
in a small town who engage in a race E sisted by a number of committeemen
for social preeminence. Among these in charge of varied activities. Gilbert
certain folk, however, there are ones Thorne, '26, is in charge of the athletic
who detest social usages and when, activity in the groups.
through the efforts of an English va- The first actual work of the new de-
let, social traditions are upset, unique partment will take place in a general
laughable situations ensue. Miss 'meeting of all freshmen on the cam-
Wilson, as the daughter of the pro- pus that will be held next Thursday
prietor of the Klondike Bar, is brought night in the assembly hall of the Un-
into contact with an English Earl who ion. At this time the work and scope
has come to Red Gap in order to res- of the committee will be explained to
cue his kinsman, the Honorable George the first year men and the actual work
Bassingwell, from the. designimg wo-I of organization will begin.
men to whose charms he himself falls
victim. [ION
"Ruggles of Red Gap" is primarily RECEP MAP KS
a comedy. It is a picturization. of CLOSE OF VISIT
Harry Leon Wilson's novel of the
same name and among the principal Marking the close of Sir Paul Vino-
players are Edward Horton, Ernest I gradoff's stay at Michigan was a fare-
Torrence, and Fritzi Ridgeway. well reception given Thursday eve-
i b - n h the Delta. Theta Phi law fra-

domes much flat ter than is usual in ciation, in re-creating the house where 1 commercial interests, and the compel- beemi worieu mn the past will navexits
such constr buct i m but wvi t eo leave p)le- moaoing it a center for the lprlOmllulgla- ency of the League of Nations wero function this year much more inelus
ty of space for operating the tele- Theodore Roosevelt was born, and discussed by Prof. W. hi. Hobbs of ive. Weekly memmclgs will take ilare
scopes underneath. The telescopes tion of his ideas, has made not only ! the Geology department in his talks of the various church teams that more
will probably be of the refractory type. the friends of this great American. before the Pan-Pacifle congress, re- efficiency may be gainer. A syserm
The lecture rooms will be especially but all Americans, its debtor!. The cently held in Sydney Au;tralia, which has been further adapted by which
wide, without supporting pillars, auld I great collections of their brother-so- are reported in a copy of The Syd- the S. C. A. exteInsioli departmenit will
designed to seat about 200 people. ciety, the Roosevelt Memorial Asso- ney Morning Herald received recently know every week the number of men
This feature has been designed to ciation, will bring before the eyes: and I by Dean John R. Effinger of the lit- or women sent from Aun Arbor, where
avoid having the lecture rooms too minds of the generations to come the erary college. they go, the nature of the meeting,
long and the back seats located too aspirations, the achievements, the ex- A direct quotation from an address I and the number addressed.
far from the speaker. The present uberant and captivating personality on the League of Nations delivered by I Aims To Link Campus and State
plan will have the seats near the of the great interpreter and apostle him before the congress at a meeting j ' Students from every important
speaker and still leave the room free of the American spirit. 'o do that is in the Sydney Town hall for the fur- country in the world are represented
of pillars. to render a great service. If I might therance of friendship and good feel- at the University studying in every
speak for the American people, it ing of the peoples of the Pacific is con- field and it is the aim of the depart-
would be to express their thanks. tained in one of the articles: " 'I be- ;ment to link up the campus with the
"It was no umere poetic fancy which lieve that the League of Nations is state at large by sending these men
Iimpelled the ancient Greks to people competent to prevent many wars if it to work at Hi-Y banquets, Commerce
-j ;~ the firmament with their mythical he- is rightly understood and applied; but clubs, Rotary luncheons, Kiwanis
roes. A great national hero, a Wash- I it was a mistake to give out to the clubs, etc. Men will be picked from
ington, a Lincoln, a Roosevelt, doe world that war could always be pre- the public speaking department a:s
shine like a star to the people who vented by the League,' Professor well as those prominent on the cai:-
I TWO SOUTh AFIRICA 1i,- NT 1,cone after hiip. In themi they find Hobbs declared, lie said that the pus. Teams of men from the different
11I;I11ENrmS DErAINED light: and by At thv' can !ter eth"1 League of Nations as it exists today, churches will aid in fulfilling the
AT I't)RT course over uncharted and 'stormy is toothless, and depends upon the state want for speakers, the extension
- -seas. force of public opinion. Ile hopes department thus acting as a general
Immigration rstrIction. is having Third Name Anmong Great however that the League will be suc- booking and lyceum bureau.

I
-

Majestic ternity. Besides law students in at-j
"Three Ages," indisputably Buster tendance were members of the facul-
Keaton's funniest comedy, and his ty of the law school, Dean and Mrs.
first ,.one to be produced in feature Henry Bates, Professor and Mrs. J. C.f
length of six reels, plays at the Ma- Grismore, Professor and Mrs. Evan
Jestic Theatre today through Wednes- Holbrook, Professor and Mrs. Edwin
day. AoD. Dickinson, Professor and Mrs. Ed-
'-Three Ages" is the most hilariously son R. Sunderland, Professor and
funny picture of Keaton's career,-a Mrs. Herbert F. Goodrich, Professor
burlesque of man and his methods Aigler and Mrs. John Barker Waite.
of winning his mate in three different
epochs of history. The picture is built R. 0. T. C. Efficiency lDemonstrated j
on a monumental scale, with scenes During the recent disastrous fire1
that show life of prehistoric man, the in Berkeley, California, the efficiency
grandeur of Rome in the time of Jul- and value of the R. 0. T. C. was demion-

a tendency to decrease the numhber I "Fourteen years ago, standing also
of foreigners studying in America, at a birthplace which has become a
according to Dr. M. L.Robbins, as- national shrine, Theodore Roosevelt
sistant to the President of the Univer- said of Washington and Lincoln:
sity. One fact which seems to sup- 'There have been other men as great,
port the theory expressed by Dr. Rob- and other men as good; but in all
bins is the fact that compared with the history of mankind, there are no
30 South Africans in last year's grad- other two great men as good as these,
nating class, there will be only 1 this ;no other two good men as great.
year. S Among the great who were also good;
Two Michigan students, W. P. Retief, among the good who were also great,
'27D, and Albert E. Wegerle, '27D, we may now inscriie a third name,
were held on Ellis Island until a few forever memorable.
lays ago through the operation of "The fame of other nien may fear
new immigration rulings. The en- the onslaught of tinme; but the fame of
trance of the two men into the country Roosevelt need not fear it. The glory
had been certified by Dr. M.L. Ward, of his statesmanship may be obsscured
dean of the College of Dental Sur- by the passage of the centuries; but
.-1.---4 12 t-1 t. . , .,

cessful in averting war and .expressed
the opinion that many voted against
America entering the League because
they thought the burden of Furope
I would fall on the shoulders of Ameri-
ca."
In another one of the stories con-
cerning the congress appearing in the
isame paper is found the following
item concerning the University's dele-
gate: "A closer cooperation between
commercial and scientific interests {
Sdi , f. Pf W T Hb

Greek theatre at Berkeley, it was vot-
B RTON To LEAVE ed by the faculty to invite Miss St.
B Dois to be the first to appear, she
ON SPEAK NG TOUR I eing donsidered the greatest contrib-
utor in America to elevating dancing
President Marion 1. murton will 'to its proper place as an art.
leave Ann Arbor Monday, November I'abylonian Scenes Introdneed
12, on a speaking trip that will take T he new piece de resistance which
him as far west as Kansas City and Miss St. Denis has evolved to add to
East to New York. lier chain of dance creations of the
He will represent the University at Far Eeast will be a Babylonian series
the National Association of State Uni- entitled "Ishter of the Seven Gates."
versities Wednesday, November 14, in S(cenically, the Ruth St. Denis produc-
Chicago. On the next day he will talk tion will be the most ambitions at-
to the Kansas City Chamber of Con- tempt of her career. It will be in
coerce and also to the Michigan alum- {very respect superior to last year's
nii of that city. 1 entertainm ent. The program will be
On November 16 the President will entirely different from the one pre-
4. TT --4... ,.,.- n ,+J-

was pieaaea or ty rror .V. L, IO)S
(U.S.A.), who expressed the belief that
important advancement :would be made
if business men arrived at a realiza-
tion of tme part science player in
f everyday life."
Mention is also madein this edition

f

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