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October 07, 1923 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

"

INSRANCE News From C
kl'HsB Cornll-Three fall tennis tourna-
HUEAESIIN RIS ments, which include the university
singles championship, the freshmani
1TION OF 7 ID 10 PERCENT singles championship, and the open
A 1V1E I (,Y I10LDERs I doubles championship, are now in pro-
$2,050,000- gress.

ther_ Colleges

i

that the chief purpose of the United
States was to prepare the Filipinos
for self government. In my opinion
he has done as much to make the
EPIUPPINESachievement of that end possible as
UJIany American who has ever been in
the Islands.

'would become a figurehead, a rubber l
stamp in the hands of Manila politic-
ians. Furthermore, he would violate
his oath of office, and abandon the last
vestige of American control over the
actual day to day government of the
Philippines.

[ C

Lansing, Oct. 6-A new fire insur-'
anee rato schedule, lowering rates
from 7 to l(, percent on mercantile
and iudustrial risks, was fIled with F.
L. Henn, state insurance commission.
It is estimated that the statewide re-
duction will save policy holders in
the neigihborhood of $2,000,000 a year.
The subnission of the revised rate
schedule vi: tually marks the last stepa
in the capitulation of the inspection
bureau to the state's campaign against
alleged unfair 'and discrimatory rates.

University of Toronto--Considerable
trouble. was caused here when the
sophomore class ordered the first year,
men to wear their socks "on the out-I
side of their trousers and to suspend,
them with white and red ribbon." The
Provost suspended the order.
1lope College-After a short and
hotly contested tug-of-war the fresh-I
men achieved a double victory here
when they easily pulled the second-
year men from the advantageous po-
sition into the rivo

ing. A big parade will follow the elec-
tions, and after that will come the
Hobo luncheon.
Wisconsin-Station WHA of the
University has resumed its broad-cast-
ing program. Prof. E. M. Terry of the
physics department is in charge of the
work.
Wisconsin-An increase of 408 in
the total enrollment of the University
is seen in the 'records compiled up to
date. The enrollment is made up of
4,623 men and 2,842 women, 2,951 of
whom are entering the University for
j the first time.
Wellesley-President Templeton of
Wellesley College will be the only

ed Woods recall have told me per- Struggle is Political "In the main," the speaker con-
ed o dyinteclha 6tolmnths rtha "The present friction between Wood cluded the relations between the
sonally the last 6 or 8 months th and certain of the Filippino leaders Filipinos and the Americans are ex-
they had found him fair, deeply in- is partially due to the conflicting ideas tremely friendly. The natives have a'
terested in the welfare of the Filip- as to the character of governorship genuine appreciation for what the
pines and that they had been able to that I have referred to. During the United States has done for them. At
cooperate with him without difficulty, administration of President Wilson, the same time, they desire independ-
Practically all the Americans on the under the leadership of governor gen- I encF, they believe that the United
Island, and a majority of the Filip- eral Harrison, the Filipinos gained States has promised it to them, and
pinos recognize the achievements of practically complete autonomy in all they intend to have it."
General Wood during the recent re- insular affairs. A large measure of_ _
construction of the islands. During self government was granted them in
his administration, the government the Jones act of 1916, under which the
has been put on a firm financial basis, government was recognized. An ad-a
the currency has been stabilized, the ditional measure of control was ab-I SH R TAND
administration of justice greatly im- solutely gained by them through the
proved, and coincident with a decrease interpretation of the Jones act in such R T , II?
in expenditure, there has been a mark- a way as to greatly curtail the power
ed increase in the efficiency of every of the governor general. The pres- SECRE
branch of the government. General elrt trouble is due in part to the at-'
Wood would be the last man to deny tempt of General Wood, actually to
the Filipinos due credit for their exercise some of the powers conferred
part in obtaining these remarkable on him by law, which were not uised 'Hamilton Bu
results. He has constantly' and suc- by Harrison. The Filipinos take the Sr E 1T AD WILL
cessfully sought to stimulate among stand that for the governor to exer-
all classes an interest in government, ci'se the legal powers is to reduce the
and to arouse them to exercise their autonomy gained under the harrison
rights as citizens. He has steadily administration. In this position they 5%
refused to discuss the question of in- 'are right. Were General Wood to - --
dependence, but has always assumed ; yield to their wishes, however, he

ContinuedI f±rom YazeNine.)I

NEARLY
READY!
WHAT?.)
The Arbor Fountain
Watch for Opening
Read the Want Ads
TARIAL TRAINING
W FORIMING
siness College
111 S'RETS

'tIIU2 IIu ue riv- woman member on the Jury of Aw~ard
Started more than a year 'and a half
g the insurance commission first r -for Edward W. Bok's famous peace
aggarvd --The men who are to op- prize-of $100,000.00.
succeeded in getting Michigan mem-I
bars of the advisory board of the rat- pose Oxford in the coming debate . --
igg bureau to replace men from other 'have finally been chosen. They are' Washington, Oct. 6-Appointment of
stat s. Then the legislature passed a MacVeagh, Walker, and Williams, and an American ambassador to Mexico
law placing the rating bureau under will speak in the orderhnamed. This will await the ratification of two treat-
the direct supervision of the depart- is the first time that these men will ies which grew out of the negotiations
mennt. , speak against Oxford. The debate wMleading to the recognition of the Mexi-j
Yeslrerday it was announced that will be held Monday night. can republic. President Coolidge ex-
George W. Cleveland, manager of the pects to send the treaties tq "congressj
bureau had been succeeded by Mr. Washburn-October 12 will be Hobo when it convenes in December and it
lienn and today the new schedule was day at this college. Classes will be j is expected here that the Mexican sen-
filed. The schedule was submitted in dismissed at 10 o'clock. Elections will ate will vote upon ratification at its
eimpihance with the new law which take place shortly after. The voting present session.
specifies that the insurance commis- for King and Queen of the Hoboes
sioner shall have access to them. The 'promises to be spirited and interest- Daily classified for real :results.
reductions, however, according to Mr.
hands were the result of the state's
war against high rates and the
charges of discrimination, which were
upel b te tae nt -isriin1

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k
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---

, i
Sty

Major Outlines
Military Follies
(Continued from Page Nine)
1812 were the same, though on a larg-
er scale, thai those of the Revolution
andl we employed a total of 520000j
men against the small British force
which reached its maximum of 16,500
in the year 1814, at which time we
bad 236,000 men with the colors.
These startling figures show the val-
le of trained forces in war.
In 1861 nine-tenths of our small
Regular Army of 16,000 men was on
the frontier, and notwithstanding the
fact that the war pot had been boiling
for years the lack o preparedness en-
guled us in a domestic war the ruin-'
os'*effects of which are yet apparent
all over our South. With fifty thous-
and regulars on the Atlantic seaboard
the Rebellion could have been put
down in its infancy.
Pay [)early for Victory
A a result of our failure to make
reasonable preparations in peace time
we have paid dearly for victory in all
our struggles since the Revolution
and have wasted both life and treas-
ure. Our wars have been needlessly
prolonged and our victories unduly
delayed because we have fought with
untrained men and with materials
provided after the opening of hostil-
ities at a cost of many times their
peace time value. Our late war was
no exception in this respect.
Upon the advent of each war it has
hcen necessary to build up a fighting
machine and our methods have not'
always been the best. The necessity'
for Congressional action at the out-
set of each and the time required to
organize and train temporary forces
have prolonged our wars. Untrained
and inexperienced men have been
placed in high positions not only in
command of troops but in the pro-
curement of supplies and material.
politics have always played an injur-
ious parnt in each of our wars dlue'
prncipaily to the lack of prepared-
ness.
We were actually at war with Ger-
many for 15 months before we were
preparedl to put an army corps into
the fight.
During the late war thecaverage
American soldier required 9 months'
training at home and in France be-
tore going into battle and the aver-
age American division spent- 10 or 11
months in training before going into
the line.- 'Our backwardness in thisj
war came anear wrecking the civiliza-
tioi of the whole world.
Congres sees Mistakes
Our present military policy as fin-!
ally adopted by Congress in 1920, was
designed to prevent a repetition of our'
mistakes and wastefulness of the past,
but there is grave danger of sliding
down hill again through sheer ignor-
ance on the part of many and the in-
ifference on the part of some. Our
military policy is not understood by
re majority of our people and this
plendid work of Congress is not fl-
ly appreciated. Our military policy
needs publicity. It must be "sold"'
to the people. There is a lot of is-
~;ionary work to be done. The world
was never more upset than it is to-
day by mistrust, jealousy, greed and
misunderstandings in the heart and
mind .of mankind.' These are the
things that bring war. While we are
at peace'in our own minds with the
whole world, we should take every
sane step to safeguard our future, for
in the event of another world confla-
pration we may eventually be embroil-
od just as we were in 1917.
We have never waged an unholy
war and never will do so. But if we:
want that eternal peace which carries
with it the exercise of human rights
we must be prepared to defend our-
selves and maintain peace.
Elbridge F. Bacon, '25E, and Ruth

qwr U W-ww-w ow

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POt02r4'

AL-
Apr/
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for

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will beautifully regiter the -mem-
ories of today 4for the tomorrows.
Make appointment for. YOUR
ICIHCANENSIAN PICTURE Today.

i

Official Frosh Pots and
Parcel Post Laundry
Cases
Laboratory Coals.
versuIs and Coveralls.
WADHAMS and Co
TW STORES

li

I

Pihon -598.

121 E. Washington St.

-s ,.

"----stay pressed so long .
don 't need the other Pair. f
GOLDMAN
Tetephane 13

Some other establish-
metits may serve foods
t hat are just as good.
Fret not a t low prices

State Street

Main Street.

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IN

Yommm mmmmm mmm ammmmm
i~ ~ ~~ na EraCcr Sries

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x

C A ETERI A

HILL AUITIM, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
OCT. 22-JOHN PHILIP S 0 U S A
and his BAND OF 100 PLAYERS
NOV. 12-MICHAEL PRESS, Russian
Violinist, Soloist with DETROIT
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA un-
der GABRILOWITSCH
DEC. 4-R ICHARDS CROOKS,
American Tenor, Soloist with DE
TROIT SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA under VICTOR KOLAR
JAN. 22-ARTHUR S H A T T U CK,
American Pianist, Soloist with DE-
TROIT SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA under KOLAR
FEB. 18-MR. and MRS. JOSEF LHE-
VINNE in a Program of TWO-
PIANO NUMBERS.
AUVRTe FTickets
AT UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC

612 East Liberty

HUNTING SUPPLIES
A full and complete line of hunting supplies
now ready for your approval at Schlenker's
Hardware. Come in and note our prices.
Service for Patronage"

I

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