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May 03, 1924 - Image 1

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11I

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TODAY

aid
WESTERN CON
EDITUJAL ASS

7

XXXIV. No. 156

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE,!F

Campus Has Many
C l a s s Memorials

URTH
NTEST

FOURTH

Since the year 1858, various classes
have shown their appreciation of tle
part that the University has played in
their lives by leaving memorials on
the campus. The class of '11 has
exhibited it with a drinking fountain,
the classes of '58, '62, and '67 with
boulders and the class of '99 with, a
1 cannon. Five engineering classes, z07,
09, '11, '13, and '20, have given the
University the Senior benches.
The largest memorial is a huge rock
of basal conglomerate and was given
to the campus by the class of '58. The
smallest, is a rock left by the Druids
in 1910. In back of the Library stands
an old Spanish motar, the gift of the
class of '99. The water fountain at
the west end of the diagonal is the gift
of- Francis M. Hamilton, '69, to the
city of Ann Arbor.

SENATE VOTES TAX
RETURNS OTPEN TOP
INSU'RGENTS OF BOTH PARTIES
WIN PROPOSAL DESPITE
G. 0. P. OPPOSITION

Squadron Head
Who Is Missing

.. f x

1PBEAKAP
A 1 N N9UALINITATIO
BANQUT_'TONIGHT'
SIX PER CENT OF SENIOR CLASS,
RECENTLY ELECTED BE-
COME AFFILIATED
MILLIKAN WILL GIVE
PRINCIPAL ADDRESS
Dean Bates, Local Chapter President!
Will Make Address of Welcome
To New Members

Coolidge Sends
Letter To Purdue
Lafayette, Indiana, Miy 2.-Pres.
Coolidge in a letter to Dr. Edward C.
Elliot, President of Purdue university,
received today at the semi-centennial
celebration of the institution, declar-
ed that the federal law for the found-
ing of land grant colleges was the
"foremost step of years for furtheringE
the cause of education". George Ade,
a Purdue graduate also paid tribute to
Purdue emphasizing that its grad-
uates had "made good' throughout the
world.

MICHIGAN B
FOR BIG TE
' RESULT OF TODAY'S
DROP EITHER SQ1
CONFERENCE
LUNDGREN TO I
ROETTGER O
Stryker Will Uphold Mi
In Pitching Duel
Visiting Sty

MELLON TAX APPEAL
BOARD GETS APPROVAL
Illinois Representative Given Honor-
able Mention For Idealism
Talk
Llewellyn Pfan-Kuchen, speaking as
the representative of the University of
Minnesota on the subject "The Control
of Progress," won first place in the
Northern Oratorical League contest
last night in Hill auditorium. He was
awarded the Frank O. Lowden Testi-
monial of $100.
William Sohrier, '24, the University
of Michigan representative, took
fourth place with his oration "Is Pro-
gress a Delusion?" The second prize
of $50 was won by Alice Hanson, of
Northwestern University. She spoke
on "Saviors of Men". Morris Sostrin,]
University of Illinois, was given hon-
orable mention for his oratiog "Want-
ed: A Return to Idealism."
Max Levingston, University of Iowa,
and Harold H. Cranefield, University
>f Wisconsin, speaking on "Social Con-
trol of Evolution" and "Justice for
F~ran'ce," respectively, took fifth and
sixth places.,
The winner, Pfan-Kuchen, in his1
speech on progress said, "Men used to
think that progress was inevitable,
that it would go on and on without
hnman effort, but this idea suffered a
set-back when, in 1914, the war turnedj
all the implements of progress to self- 1
lestruction.
Nature does not command progress,'
rather she opposes it. But the in-
genuity, of man has overcome nature.j
Progress is not the result of inevi-
;able destiny but of man's practical
3ontrol. Man has not only over-pow-!
ered the forces of nature 'but now!
nakes them =-ork for him."
Talks On Wilson Idealism,
The second prize winner, Alice Han-

'CONTROL
TITLE OF

OF PROGRESS'
PRIZE SPEECH

Walsh Of Massachusetts Introduces
Measure To Provide For
Inheritance Levy

HOLD SWING-OUT
WITHOUT BURTON

1
FOR MOTHER'SDAY
Event Of Welcome Including Fitting
Program Will Start
Saturday
GUEST W1LL BE PRINCIPAL
SPEAKER SUNDAY AFTERNOON
Completion of the specially arrang-
ed program to be carried out Saturday
and Sunday May 10 and 11 in cele-
bration of the annual Mother's Day j
was announced recently by Donald '
Williams, '25L, chairman of the com-
mittee of the Student Christian associ-
ation, sponsoring ' the events. The
program will begin Saturday after-
noon with a' specially conducted tour1
of points of interest on the campus and
in other parts of the city, and will be
followed with a banquet in the as-
sembly room of the Union.;
The banquet is to be the event of:
w'elcome for the mothers. One .of
the most elaborate banquet programs
ever contemplated is now under way
and 'will begin at 5:30 o'clock. It will
include toasts, sets of vaudeville, and
short Mother's Day talks. Since the
banquet tickets will be limited in
number, students are urged to secure-
t hem at once' from 'Williams at Lane!
hall. Tickets will be placed on 'gen-
etal sle.Monday at fraternities-and;
bdok stors.
The'coimnittee in charge of the
week-end is as ' follows: Don-!
ald Williams, '25L;Harold Steele, '25E,
Homer: Hattendorf, '24, Frank Bailey,
'24, 'Helen Brown, '25, Elura Harvey,
'25, Ruth Rankin, '25; and Frieda
Diekhoff, '24.
Sunday morning all of the local
churches will conduct special Moth-
er's Day services, and in the afternoon
the big meeting in Hill auditorium
will be held. At this time Edgar A.
Guest, well-known poet from the De-
troit Free Press will read some of his
d k batiQnal n ahnt fittin

Washington, May 2.-Tax returns
were voted open to public inspection
today by th'e senate as Republican in-
surgents and Democrats combined in
the first major attack on' the revenue
bill. The publicity proposal was bit-
terly fought by Republican organiz-,
ation leaders 'who were willing, how-
ever, to agree to inspection of the re-
turns by certain congressional com-
mittees as voted by the house and ap-
proved by the. finance committee..
Disposing of a series of other pro-
posals in an eight hour session, the
senate cleared the way for opening
tomorrow on the contest on the in-
come tax schedule, th'e heart of the'
bill.
Other action taken today included:
I rejection of the finance committee
amendment imposing a 10 percent tax
on radio sets, 40-13.
Rejection of treasury department
'proposals to limit deductions in re-
lation to incomes from tax exempt
securities, 37-36.mApproval of Secre-
tary Mellon's suggestion for a board
of tax appeals with some modification.
Aside from the income tax rate, two
other provisions on which extended
fights are in prospect remain to be
considered-the estate and fcorpor-
ation taxes. Amendments, indoesed by
the Democratic conference, were in-
troduced today, proposing substitutes
for these which would change the
entire form' of the tax.
It gives the'e corporation and option,
upon unanimous consent of the stockj
holders of being taxed instead of un-
der the partnership levy.,
Sen. Walsh, Democrat, Mass., intro-
duced a substitute for the estate taxi
to provide for an inheritance levy mak-
ing the tax apply on a beneficiary of
a'na estate instead of directly on the
estate itself before it is .divided. Rates
tartiig at 2 percent oni 25,000 and,
graduating up to 30 percenton' $5;600,-
000 are proposed. .
STAYRSTESE
PRACTCAL NE~lI

Major F. L. Martin
Major Martin, head of the squadron.
of planes scheduled to travel around
the world, has been reported "Still
lost". Three other planes of thet
squadron, while ordered to continue,
are waiting to learn om Major Mar-
tin's fate 'before' proceeding on their
journey.
PLI'GHT_,U NKNOWN
Many Vessels Engaged in Search in
Pacifi eFor MIssing
Plane
THREE OTHER MACHINES
READY TO JOIN IN HUNT
Bremerton, Wash., May 2. - The
search for Major Frederick L. Mar
tin, commander of the American world
flight squadron and his mechican, Sar-
geant Alva Harvey, missing since
Wednesday, widened ands intensified
today as dispatches received here in-
dicated that their plane had not-been
seen since they left Chignik for Dutch'
Harbor.
Scores of vessels. are engaged in as
systematic search of thewaters. of the.
Pacific ocean south of the Alaska pen-,
insula between Chignik 'and False
Pass while share parties are hunting.
in, the, Aleutian mountains west of
Chignik for' the missing plane.
The three other planes of the!
squadron now at Dutch Harbor, al-
though instructed to continue their
flight, were said to be in readiness to
join in the search should it be deemed
advisable, according to the latest ad-
vises received here.
EXAMINAIONS IN JUNE

Phi Beta Kappa, international lion-
orary scholastic society, will hold its
annual initiation banquet at 7:30 o'-
clock tonight in the main dining
room of the Union. At this time 6 per
cent of the senior class of the Liter-
ary and education schools, the num-
ber elected recently for membership,
will become associated with the Michi-
gan chapter of the society. The
principle speaker of the evening, Dr.'
Robert Andrews Millikan, will give
an address, "The Significance of
Modern Science."
In addition to the student neophytes
present will be the distinguished edu-
cator, President Paul Voelker of Oi-'
vet college. President Voelker was
elected as an alumnus member of Phi
Beta Kappa by the recently estab-.
lished chapter at Drake university.
Inasmuch as President Voelker will'
be unable to get back to Drake in
time for the annual initiation,.officials
have requested the Michigan group to
include him in their ceremonies.
Bates is Toastmaster
Desin Henry M. Bates of the law
school, president of the local chapter,
will welcome the new members.
Chalmers H. Quaintance, '24, and Maryj
McCully, '24, two of the newly elected,
will reply to his word of welcome
from the president. Dean Bates will
be toastmaster of the evening.
Professor Millikan, who. was the
second American to win the Nobel
physics prize, has made some of the
biggest contributions of recent years
to the facts known about atomic'
molecular structure. He took his
bachelor's degree at Oberlin college
in 1891 and was in later years award-
ed degrees by Berlin, Columbia, North-1
western, Amherst and Dublin uni-'
versities. Among the most recent of
his books is "The Electron," published
in 1917.
Speaker Won Nobel Prize
Among his most important discover-
ies were the proof that ,electrfeity
has an atomic structure and the 'uea-
surement of the unit charge of the
electron. The only other American!
who ever won the Nobel prize in phy- I
sics was A. A. Michelson, who was
honored for his important works in
1907.
Professor Millikan is now associated
ith the Norman Bridge laboratoryf
of physics at the California Institute
of Technology, Pasadena, and is chair-
man of the administrative council of
that organization.{
Tickets for the banquet will be $1.501
and will be on sale at the door. In-
vitations have been extended to all
alumni of the chapter and an earlyt
count of acceptances indicates that a
large gathering will assemble for the
annual meeting, it was stated yester-
day.

President Too Ill To Be Present
Annual Function; Seniors To
Appear In Gowns

CLASSES FORM 1:30 O'CLOCK t
TUESDAY ON CAMPUS WALKS
President Marion L. Burton will be
unable to address the Swing-Out gath-
ering in Hill auditorium next Tuesday
when all the senior classes in the Uni-
versity will unite, in Caps and Gowns,
for the annual observance of this tra-
ditonal event. Because he has not
sufficiently recuperated from his re-
cent illness the president will be un-
able to conform to the usual custom
of making the annual speech, which is
always given by the president of the
University. President Burton has made
the address three times since his in-J
auguration..
The classes wil form on the various
Walks leading to the medallion in
front of the Library at 3:30 o'clock!
next Tuesday afternoon. At 3:45 o'-
clock the Varsity band, which will be
on the steps of Hill auditorium in uni-
form, will start playing and the march
will begin.
The seniors will then march out of
line in the following order: Lit wo-
men, lit men, engineers, architects,
medics, nurses, laws, dents, pharmics,
graduates, educationals and school of
vplsic seniors. The ground floor of
Hill auditorium will be sectioned off
for the various classes which will sit
as groups. Rev. L. A. Barrett, of the'
Presbyterian church, will give the
invocation.' 'f
The senors will then march out of
Hill auditorium and across the design-
ated walks on the campus, the lines
of black Caps and Gowns forming a
block "M" in the swing. Individual
class pictures will ,then be taken, on
the steps of the Library where the
march will end.
Seniors are ,urged to' call at George
Moe's'sport shop on North Univer-'
sity avenue as soon as possible for
their Caps and Gowns so that they
may have them in readiness for Tues-
day.
InCr*nationva
Music Week Is,
New To rk Plan'l

At'

Michigan's baseball nin
Coach Lundgren's Ilhinic
2:30 o'clock today at the
diamond in a contest 1
promise of being an il
in the Big Ten race. Bot
undefeated thus far, the :
three victories to her c
the Wolverines have co:
two foes. Minnesota is th
Conference team that rem
en. The Gophers howev
(gaged in but one contes
Iowa 6-1. Thus the resu
game will send either P
Illinois from the leading
Illinois, favored to capt
mond title last year, wa
bow to the prowess of
championship nine, and
are bent on recovering sc
prestige. Although sever,
have won berths on this
the Illini have another
fitj which was considered
to Ohio State at the start
son.
Coach Lundgren has bu
around Wally Roettger,
star twirler, Roettger pit
Wisconsin last Saturday,
and then defeated Iowa f
day, winning his own g
triple. The hurler's hittir
en almost as great a factc
linois victories as has 1
Roettger has rested since
will be fit to go the full.
Lefty O'Connor, who has

'y.' Mst we always blind our-'
es to the truth simply because'it
ot compatable with the'times?"
orris Sostrin, of Illinois,'talked onf
idealism of Woodrow Wilson. In
ing his'belief in Wilson'sideals,
rin said, "One hundred thousand
America's finest manhood gave
r last full measure of devotion in
er ' that their president's ideals
ht live. Our republic has become
t only because we do glorify
Schrier Speaks On Progress l
chrier spoke on the progress that'
already been made by the world
came to the conclusion that an
rnational court is necessary to
ntain and further that progress.
ie judges in the debate were the
ilty men who accompaniedthe sev-
speakers from their universities.I
ley B. Houck, national president
)elta Sigma Rho, presided. This
ie thirty-fourth contest of the lea-
IO GEIN FVOR
STRICTING IMMIGRA9NTS,

New York Teachers' College
Speaks on "Development Of
SC utai ft a

Man

of Roettger. Should Mich
in getting to Roettger's
prevent him from going
spree, the' Wolverines sI
the tilt.
However, there ,are s
men on the Indian rost
been playing exceptiona
in certain games. Wit
consistent, the Lundgren
move mor smoothly on
the title. ullnew thin
leadoff m , is a fine :
I good hitter. His home
the Hawkeyes aided mat
win. Margolis, outfielder
prizzi, at short, are also
Jestes at second is fie
date, but has appeared v
stick. However he sho
as this is his first year of
petition. Harper will p
"Red" Granger's place
gardens snce the All-A
has failed to deliver at 1
(Continued on Pa
SOLDIER BONUSI

poetry, ana speax on a su jecL ng 119uperntendeur-
for the occasion.I
LEADS IN DISCUSSION ON
PROBLEMS OF FINANCES
SUrging'that piospective superin-
ADOT H Rtendents be given more practical work
:and-that they should be brought1

in contact with concrete problems in

de
°o r

ington, May 2, (By' A. P.)-
nt Coolidge announced to
House callers today his en-
ent of the proposal that im-
is ineligible to citizenship be
d from the U. $.
dt to obtain alteration of the
ation bills provision in this
were explained by spokesmen
president as being designed
to phrase the new policy in
'st courteous manner possible.
House officials were said to
s certain the eventual enact-
f Asiatic exclusion into law and
only to give it' the least prac-
e offense to friendly nations.

Establishment of the honor systemj
in examinations in the Medical Schoolj
was made probable yesterday when"
students of all classes of the schoolf
gathered'for a general mass meeting
in Natural Science auiditorium to 'have "
the proposed system explained to
them. Dr. Udo J. Wile, 'acting for'
Dean Hugh Cabot, explained -thatiit
was proposed to inaugurate a Student
council composed' of men~ chosen fro
the classes by popular election.
With this council will be placed the
responsibility of the honor system, andI
other matters of discipline, not re-
quiring immediate action of the ad-'
ninistrative authorities of the Mdi-
cal School. The council it is sug-
gested, will be composed of one fresh-
man, two sophomores and three men
from each of the two higher classes..
It is the ultimate aim 'of the school,
I according to Dr. Wile, to place in the
university catalogue definite rules up-
holding an honor system which stif-
dents must accept before they will be
admitted to the school.
Class presidents were asked by Dr.
Wile to call meetings of thel various
classes to hold' discussions "on the'
matter, after which they will be'ask-
ed to submit their reports of the meet-
ings, which' will be placed' in 'the
hands of a faculty committee. N
definite action;' whatever, has been
taken in regard to the affair.'
Chubb Elected to State Oice
Donald B. Chubb, '24, was elected
secretary-treasurer of the state offi-
cers training conference held here
,last week-end, under the auspices ofI

>
f <j
k
I
,
{

their preparation for administrativeI Examination of medical students
offices, Prof. George Strayer of the who expect to graduate this June, by.
New York Teachers' college, spoke on the National Board of Medical examin-
"TheDeveopmet ofthe upernten ers wiill be conducted during the. lat-
"The Development of the Superinten- er part of the month of June, accord-
dent," before a nieeting of the school 'ing to announcement made yesterday
administrators at:,the Union last afternoon at the mpedical school. The,
night. examinations have been arranged inf
s hat tO parts, the first of which will takeI
Professor Strayer advised ta the' place June 19, 20, and. 21. The sec-i
first year of a student's preparatory ond will take place June 20, and 21.
work contain real problems that can- Appications for the June examin-f
not be solved by consulting a textbook aton must Ile made before May 1>.
and he advocated that after gradua-
tion the student becompelled to serve AQDD'W n E
a-i "internship." The "interne" wouldlnl Ift
be placed in a city with only a nomin- nu- I
al salary but would be given experi-
ence in administrative offices, was
t'roressr ~traye's in

i------

WHAT DOES ,

!Professor Strayer's plan.
In the morning session the superin- 1
tendents discussed school finances.
The advisability of adopting efficient!
accounting systems as- are used, by 1
business concerns and the losses in-
curred' making additions - to school-
programs without- first estimating
their cost, were among the questions
!rought- up. The discussion was led=
by Professor Strayer.
Further questions of school finance
and a discussion on how the School
of Education may be made more ser- I
viceable to the state were:tal.ked over
in the afternoon session. The problem I
of -adopting a uniform teaching.systein
and the plan of L. A. Butler, superin-'!
tendent of Ann Arbor schools, in the
organization of summer schools, were]
as diced. t .

Washington, May 2.-The senate
Daugherty investigating committee
today heard .Kenesaw Mountain Lan-
dis, former federal judge and at pres-
ent "the czar" of baseball, criticizing
the granting of a federal pardon in
a liquor case and accumulated anoth-
er law suit.
The legal action. was taken by for-
mer attorney general Daugherty who
through his consul filed an injunction
suit in- the. district of Columbia, su-
preme court -to prevent the committee
from obtaining possession of telegrams
he has sent and received in Washing-
ton.
The Landis criticism was directed
at the release of Philip Grossman a
former Chicago saloon keeper from a
year's imprisonment for violating the
nrhiimnn n

FELD H OUSE TOel
NEW EQU1IENT ROO00M
Arrangements have been complet-
ed by which the Yost field house will
be furnished with an equipment room
that, will probably surpass any like
system in the country. .An, entire
room in the structure will be devotedj
to storing an giving out athletic goods1
for all sport$.
Ond man will devote his attention
to operating the equipment room and;
maintaining the repair of all ath-
letic goods, besides carefully checkingf
up all outfits that are issued to the
athletes. It is expected that the waste
saved by repairs and a careful check-1
ing system will more than pay for the
maintenance of the room, and is real-
ly an economic measure, according to
Coach Tad Weiman, who has been
formulating the details of the new
feature..
KANSAS STUDENT PLCES"
IN ARCHITECT CONTEST
Lawrence, Kansas, May 2.-Joseph

"United States of music" is the title
of an editorial in the New York Times
which suggests a international music
week in connection with the first nat-
ional music week, May 4-10.,
"There has been organized in Eur-
ope," says the Times, "the Internation-
al society for Contemporary music,
with its headquarters in London, which
is referred to by one critic as the
capital of this 'new United Statesof
music.' That it is internationally con-
stituted may be inferred from a per-
former by it in Salzburg in August.
There was an English singer, German
string quarter, French wind players
and an Austrian tympanist under an
English conductor, with a dozen dif-
ferent nationalities represented in the
audience." The Times .suggests that
an international music week of this
,sort should *be sponsored by music
lovers in the :United States.

New officers elected for the ensu-
ing year by the University Club, meet-1
ing last night at their club rooms,
were; Prof. W. P. Lombard, of the
physiology department, president;
Prof.1H. J. Goulding, of the engin-
eering college, member of the Board!
of Directors; Prof. H. C. Carver, of thef
mathematics department, secretary;
and Harry Howley treasure, A short
entertainment program after which
light lunch was served followed the
election of officers.
Ask Graduating Students' Names
Friendly Relations Committee of the
Student Christian association has been
asked to co-operate with the national
l rmmffas o a o m nanrn . naur

i versity Club
Elects Officers

,
1
I;
{
1
'

Washington, May 2.-Cc
action on the soldier bon
completed today with adol
house of the conference ri
measure, which now goes t
dent.
The report, already appi
senate, was given house ;
a viva voce vote. During
discussion which preceede
the report, Rep. McKenzie,
Illinois, sharply criticizes
conferees for accepting
amendment which would
bills benefit on female yep
navy.
"Most of them receive(
during the war than the
before", he said. "Grant
bonus simply gives the pre
ground for vetoing the b
plain holdup."
PURDUE BOEATS P1
IN HHARDG
Chicago, May 2.-Purdu
defeated Northwestern, 6-!

W i AI + MY 4YFM14h1 F91 Y rrrl ii

The

the lit
gr-r-r-
mit o

at mean when she
me-ow, What does
mean when he goes
h. We will not con-
; upon such a mo-
.inn - a - n

-'-4.

Milo

E

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