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March 30, 1924 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-03-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MARCH 30, 1924

SUNDAY,

C

NEWSPAPER OF THE
ERSITY OF MICHIGAN
every morning except Monday
University year by the Board in
Student Publications.
tof Western Conference Editorial
ociated Press is exclusively en-
use for~ republication of ail news
credited to it or not otherwise
this paper and the local news pub-
in.
at the poston ce at Ann Arbor,
s secon c lasoatter. Special rate
granted by T~hird .assistant Post-
eral.
on by carrier, $3.so; by mail,
Ann Arbor Press 13uilding, May-
Editorial, 2414 an 1'6-Ml; Busi-
nn-miunications. not ex cedin 300
be published in ThieDaily at
on of the Editor. Upon request,
y of communicant will be re-
confidential.

Now that Russia is at last assum-
ing a possible attitude which would A L
make her recognition plausible, and,
at the same time safe, for the general M
welfare of the country, the situation
should be considered with all pos- HAIL To t
sible expediency, and, if possible, Rus- DENIZENS! fit
sia should be allowed to once more tion
resume her natural places among the Yesterday afternoon a new society e
va afh was born on this campus, already 1e

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CAMPUS OPINION I

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NOW ran
Nk -mm

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EDITORIAL STAFF
lephones, 2414 and 176-1
MANAGING EDITOR
HARRY D. HOEY.
itor..................Rcbt. B. Tarr
Board Chairman....R. C. Morarity
or..............J. C. Garlinghouse
Night Editors
les A. B. Connable, Jr.
Clark T. E. Fiskej
P. M. Wagner

nLation t Uothe wor.
The time has come when the world
should begin to realize that by its
action it is isolating not only a na-
tion of millions of people and denying
the right to a reestablishment of nor-
mal conditions, but is also Injuring
itself because, the sooner Russia is
recognized and the world is able to,
obtain the use of its vast resources,
the quicker normal conditions can be
established in general.
Nor do Russia's suggestions bear
the stamp that she is not realizing
the entire situation, or that she is
yet bigoted in some manner. "Rus-
sia's peace program involves four
main points" states the Christian
Science Monitor.
1. Parallel disarmament agree-
ments between various states.
2. The basing of armaments up-
on the size of the population and
the resources of the countries con-1
concerned.1
3. The fixing of military bud-
gets of all .states and compelling
the disbandment of all irregular
forces.
4. The creation between neigh-
boring states of demilitarized
frontier zones subject to inspec-
tion by mixed commissions.
After a close examination of these
policies, the soundness of Russia's at-
titude must be admitted. If her re-

swarming with them. But this new
one is pretty hot. The name of it is
DENIZENS-the Aristophanes chap-
ter of Denizens, national humor se-
cret society. Here are some of the
choice sentences from the Constitu-
tion, as drawn up by the charter mem-
ber.
There shall-be as many officers as
members of the chapter-
Membership is restricted unalter-
ably to four members.
Meetings shall be held at stated in-
tervals.
A publicity director, shall be ap-
pointed to issue information to the
press.
Special meetings may be called upon
presentation of a petition signed by
one member.
The purpose of the club shall be :e-
cret.
After the constitution had been
accepted and ratified with much cheer-
ing by the quorum, the club went in-
to committe of the whole and elected
Cowles publicity director. It will be
his duties to publish the minutes of
the society on every occasion when a
meeting takes place. This is respect-
fully submitted.

havi
ses:
Ne
ever
hav
Ur
Dail
give

.. ... ._ _ .. _ t., . _... _ _ _svs.av

he Editor:
has just been called to my atten-
that my name was among those
d on a petition requesting len-
y for a certain man charged with
iug intoxicating liquor in his pos-
ion.
o petition of the above nature wss
presented to me nor would I
e signed it had it been.
pon looking up the article in The
y, I notice that the name there
n is C. C. Edmunds-my name,

AMPOd
tiraham"s

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Stores

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.r...............Ralph N. liers
litor............Winona Hibbard
r..............Ruth A. Howell
tv Editor.: .: :nieth C. Kellar
_higan News Bureau. R. G. Ramisay
iditor......Robert B. Henderson
Assistants
nan E. C. Mackt
nell Verena Moran
:er hlarold Moore
n Carl Ohlmacher
Cote 11rde perce
is Andlrew Pro p per
ich Regina leichxnann
r ~E nlarie Schraud x~
useworth C. A. Stevens
W .I.Stneman
trai Marie Reed
Ill N. R. Thal
{er N Y J. Walthour
iebermannHerman Wise

THE FABLE OF THE PHYSICIAN
AND THE GIANT

cognition is as yet considered some- A giant one day was afflicted with
what1impossible, in view of what her
admisio to he eage wold eanblood pressure, and called upon a phy-
dmission to the league would mean
1,. ii in to bleed him so that li ecmild

however, is spelled with an o insteada
)f a u. --C. C. Edmonds.
Assistant Professor of Commerce andf
Industry.
To the Editor:
There is hardly a student who wouldI
not care to see a closer intimacy of
the proper type between the students
and the faculty, because he feels that
such an intimacy would greatly insure
to his benefit.
This year approximately twenty
faculty members have been visiting
fraternity houses where they discuss
with the students subjects of common,
current interest. These meetings have
on the average taken place weekly
for about five weeks. The majority
of the fraternities which the faculty
men have visited report that there is
a distinct need for these discussions,
that they should be carried on next
year on a broader scale, and that they
offer an unusually tangible benefit
to the students. They open a way of
understanding to the students of what
those who teach them are thinking
and just how exceptional they are as
friends.
A number of students have recent-'
ly suggested that a faculty-student
mixer be held at which both faculty
men and students might lay aside all
formality and meet on a common
plane. The faculty members might
give short plays in which they could
show the students what they were as
human beings and companions. The
students might shake hands with the
men and make a personal acquaint-
ance with them; they might have rep-
resentative campus leaders give short
talks. The whole meeting might be
one essentially to break down any
barriers of misunderstanding between
the student and the faculty members
and to effect between the learner and
the teacher bounds; of sympathy andE
understanding.
Why should the Student Christian
association or the Union. not hold
such a mixer, or why should these
two organizaticns not combine to put
such a project across?

DETROIT UNITED LINES
EAST BOUND
Limiteds: 6 a. m., 9:10 a. m. and
every two hours to 9:10 p. m.
Express: 7 a. m., 8 a, m. and evwy
two hours to 8 p. m.
Locals: 7 a. mt., 8:55 a. mn. and
every two hours to 8:56'p. mn.,
11 p. m. To Ypsllantu only, 11:4
p. In., 12:25 a. m. and 1:15 a. .
WEST BOUND
Limiteds: 8:47 a. m. and every two
hours to 8:47 p. m.
Express (making local stops): 9:51
a. ra. and every two hours to 9:50
p. M.
Locals: 7:50 a. m., 12:1 a. n.

Iq
Do Yu Want to feel at Home?

G ET YOUROTTLE FR EE
BY BR INGING. YOU R CAR D TO

MARCH

i

ADRIAN-ANN AIB41 BUS LINE
Central 'Tipe (Slow TI re)
Leave Ckramhrr of Corirnierce
Week Days St Inays
6:45a. M. 6.45 a. m.
1245 p.m. - p.m.
4:45 r-p.
JAi, H. ELLIOTT, P,,oprietor
Phone (26-M Adrian. Mirh.

8 At T IV F
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
10 17 1S 19 020 21 22
23 24 2 ,20. 27 28 29
10 31
SPiIM HATS READY
Save a i1ollar or lMore at (Jur
Store
high Class fork in Cleaning
and Reblockluwg
FACTORY hAT STORE
C16 Packard St. Phone 1792,
(Where 1). U. I. Stops at State)

Then come' to the
POLLY LITTLE TEA SHOP

i
t'.

Read the Want Ads

"U
L

ansfield _
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAURENCE H. FAVROT
ng...... ........... E..Dnn
-~ ~ -L- -u-nn".
nth........... .....erry M. Hayden
ag.....................W. -oesser
.............H.E i Rose
. .. ...... ...:.....l.114. L Hale
do.. ...... Purdy
S . ...........Lawrence--ierc
Assistants
amp ell N. V. Tolland
'aplaM IN.L. Ireland
Lpion Harold A, Marks
)in Byron Parker
Dexter A. j. Seidman
finn Ge. A. Stracke
VOX I. C. Winter

NDAY MARCII 30, 1924-
gtEditor- OT. G. RAMSAY
IS A JUST PUN8IMENT
e ntly there have been several
es c21 the 6ampus 'where, in the
Qi of the University, it-has been
e ry fr certain students to be
iused. The right or wrong of the*
sion is now qu'estioned; undoubt-
, the disciplinary authorities act-
or the good of Michigan.
et. t:ere is room for argument,.
ever, in the method of punishment
ch was chosen. Just what good is
Lved from expelling a man from
Doo? It robs him of a chance to
sli his education. It embitters him
,inst the world, and often leads him
forget his trouble by making a
'se mistahe than the one which led
il isinissal. Moreover, this form
ptnishment hurts, most of all, en-
1y innocent people-the parents of
student. Youth is triumphant; it
ot utterly discouraged by misfor-
es, but to older people, the dis-
ce is a mortal blow, and is not soon
Totten.
fter all college men are young
a. They sometimes are led in their
1 and enthusiasm to miake mistakes,
n though with the best intentions.
ittle quiet and sympathetic under-
iding would do more to cure the
htl out-cropping of evil han un-
emonious dismissal. Where :there
n opportunity to build a man by
recting and building certain stan-
ds, life at the University, if gene-
conditions are what they should
under the direction of faculty
ds who are wise and sympathetic,
nuch more effective than punish-
it which tends to remove all the
d influences in a man's life and
kes toward the idea of punishment
punishment's sake.
RUSSIA NOW READY
.ussia has given her answer to a
lmunication sent her recently by

to the world, every action should be I i at -'1-L l-----
taken to bring about her acceptance as recover.
soon as possible. "I shall have to cut you," said the
physician, "with a knife a hundred
,THE MAN~t DEFINES THE II®R times as large as one used by human
Recognition of scholarly worth is beings."
indicated In the announcement of the "Never fear," replied the giant. "But
recent action of the Boards of Regents I could crush you to death by the
in appointing Associate Professor Wil- slightest pressure of my thumb."
liam A. Frayer to a full professorship, The physician climbed on to the
and Dr. Arthur S. Aiton to the position giant's shoulder, and hacked at his,
of assistant -professor. The Univer- neck with an axe.
sity may view this in pleasing con- "Aha!" laughed the giant, "so you
trast with a similar action at a re- are using a needle to prick me?"
cent meeting of the Board. The physician, however, drew blood,'
Long considered by his students to and collected it in several pails which i
be one of the most competent, and he let down to the earth on a ro'e.
consistently successful teachers ca- "At present," said the physician,
pable of imparting knowledge to the "your blood pressure should be re-
student mind, Professor Frayer right- duced by six pails of blood."
ly has been awarded the highest tri- "It is not enough," said the giant,'
bute which can be accorded him by "my veins are still pounding. Cutl
an insti ution of higher learning. His me again, and fear nothing, remember-
ability as a scholar of history is note- ing that I could snap you in two withi
worthy, but it is his capability as a iy front teeth."
teacher that has brought to him the The physician climbed up the other
title of full professor. Dr. Aiton in shoulder and, having made 1 now
his short stay as a member of the wound with a pick-axe, r'emoved
faculty has given evidence of his twelve pails of the giant's blood.
scholarly attainments, making his ap- "Now," said the physician, "I ad-I
pointment to the rank of assistant vise you to lie down and fall asleep,
professor also a point for commenda- for so only will your blood pressure be
tion. further reduced."'
Such careful selection, in making "I consent," replied the giant. "Do
future recommendations will undoubt- anything with me, and know you can
edly quell the recent criticisms of have you. way, though I could blow
carelessness which have assailed ad- you over like a straw."
ministrative authorities. The Univer- The giant lay down, and fell into
sity should give its honors to those deep slumber. Then the physician
who have proved themselves to be slyly cut him again, and drained half
worthy if the title of professor is to of his blood away. When the giant,
be considered in its proper light-as awoke, he could-not rise on account of
a recognition of notable work in the his weakness.
realm of scholastic achievment.. "Your blood pressure," said the phy-,
sician, "is much reduced, and you need"
Is Student Governnent a Success? not fear my knife, though a single
That all depends on the individual de- stroke from it woul4 extinguish your
i tir f nrt gtovernment. There -

i

Delicious Fudge Calee, Light Lunches-Our Specialties
POLLY LITTLE TEA SHOPPE
On Thayer, Just Back of H ill Auditorium

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F thqse .eant a
Sunday deinr yo11 l
jytai S t trurkcy d- 3
Baeyii. ham

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4 *''C~Il.'-l1-k <- <

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7 TI TULq,

Cafeteria,

Up stafirs,

Nickels"' A rca'de

fntYon oI s~u en gvvra i. la
are, at least, four current opinions as
to the correct meaning of the term at
Michigan.
Fellow students, for the love of
Venus, keep off any spot of grass you
can find on the campus.
Canes and caps and gowns are in
order, so order now.
STwenty-Five YearsI
AgotMichzigan
From the Files ,of the U. of 31. Daily,
March 30, 1839
Last evening Dr. Dock delivered a
lecture on the various theoretical ways
in which malaria is carried.
Postponment of the Junior social
from the 28 until the 31 of March was
necessitated because of a conflict with
the Athletic association.
The senior law class expressed
spirited objections to President Egan's
appointment of the class day commit-
tee, contending that President Egan

"I see," murmured the giant. "What
are you going to do with all my
blood?
"That," replied the physician, "puz-
zles myself."
.-J. P. L.
* * *
HEARD ON THE DIAGONAL
First she: (Quite obviously an ar-
dent supporter of the "Know Your
University Movement) My dear, do
you know that since its beginning, the
Medical school has used 35,000 stiffs?
Isn't that stupendous!
Second she: (not as cognizant of the
little intimate details concerning the
running of the University) How droll!
Gaylord.
* * *
CIIINOISE
I used to eat to a Chinese joint.
Now I eat to an American place
across the street
Every day
As I sit in the American place where
I eat to
Now
I see
The Chinese
In their Chinese joint across the
street
(Where I USETA eat)
And wistfully shake a Chinese tong
At me

"THE HOUR CLASS," it should be
announced again, is to be presented
this evening at 7:30 o'clock in the
Presbyterian church, and again, that
the general public is cordially and
very freely invited.
"T-E HOUR GLASS," ir undoubted-
ly one of Yeats' most beautiful and
striking plays, and Yeats', of course,
is one of the most beautiful and
striking dramatists of the day.
It should, however, be made clear
to those who hare not read the
allegory that it contains none of sen-
timental propaganda usually filling
the average "religious" drama. It is
simple, universal, and permeated with
the primitive spirit that has made the
author and his Irish Rennaissance
famous.
In the present production every at-
tempt will be made to remove the per-
formance from anything theatric:
from footlights and paint'ed canvass,
poppy lips and dividing curtains. In
place of these there will be only a bare
platform, a flood of lights, and dark-
ness. And possibly, as a result, a
new atmosphere may be created,
starker but surely more in keeping
with the requirements of the play.
Obviously it is an interesting experi-
ment to produce a play in a church,
to bring the theater back to its "birth-
place," but beyond that it is also a
feeble venture into a new stagecraft,
the kind of technique that Kenneth
MacGowan hints at in his "The Thea-
ter of To-morrow"- a bare stage, a
powerful drama, and a quiet atmo-
sphere . . . and a quiet audience.
The cast of "The Hour Glass," in
detail, includes Thomas Dasef as thel
Wise Man, Anne Miller as Bridget, his
wife,Hortense Hoad as the Angel,
[Ruth Vermilyea as the First Child,

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ATtTNTY TAT Y31 AM

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AA)D ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t k ~NN'-1L1LAII

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Skowinig at ih Whitney April 2id-4th
U nider the Direction of J. RALEIGHI NELSON
A Remarkable Cast
A Mutiny on Ship Board
One of the Season's Greatest Plays

retariat asking her opinionJ
he disarmament projects. In
her opinion, Russia takes the
a to formulate certain concrete
ions designed to "promote Eu-
peace and to clarify" its at-
owards the League.
ag on the eve of the London

Seat Sale

Hill Auditorium-Monday and Tuesday
Whitney Theatre-Wednesday, Thursday
and Fridav

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