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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1922 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

LOAN AS IAT
MEETS HERE TOAY.
Mayor George E. Lewis Will Welcome
Delegates to Convention
Wr I Iz City "Y"
JRESIDENT BURTON, REGENT
BEAL TO ADDRESS ASSEMBLY

F'RESHME+N ENGINEERS TAKE
MECilANICAL D!RAWING WORK
Freshmen students in the engineer-
ing college comprise the first class re-
quired to take a three hour course in
mechanical and machine drawing dur-
ing the first semester. Formerly little
drawing work preceded the course in
descriptive geometry usually taken the
second semester, and some students
had difficulty .when tiastudy of this
subject began. It is believed by those
in charge of the work iat this condi-
tion will be remedied by the change.
NOWORDINNU EUPASSED
r LFOROTRAFFIG VIOLTORS

More than 150delegates are expect-
ed to be in attendance at the thirty-
fifth annual convention of the Michi-
gan Building and Loan Association
League which opens this morning.
This number is composed of delegates
from the 80 Michigan associations
that make up the league, and their
wives. Headquarters have been es-
tablished at the Allenel hotel and the
meetings will be held in the city
Y. M. C. A.
At 11 o'clock this morning after the
business of registration has been
completed, the welcome address wiP
be given by Mayor George E. Lewis
of Ann Arbor, and a response made
by William H. Peck, of Kalamazoo.
Committee appointments will then be
made and the report of the executive
committee read
At the afternoon session at 1:30
4'clock the president of the league,
W. S. Osborn, of Jackson, will give
the opening address. Then a paper
will be read by Robt. C. Dexter, state
examiner, on "Some Problems for the
League.". Following that a paper will
be read on "The U. S. League Meet-
ing" by Wm. C. Sheppard, of Grand
Rapids. A discussion will take place
after each paper. The reports of the
secretary, Irving B. Rich, of Jackson,
and the treasurer, Fred M. Phelps, of
Adrian, will then be given.
Burton to Speak Tonight
Tonight a banquet will be given to
all the visiting delegates by the local
members at the Michigan Union. At
this time President Marion L. Burton
will give an address on "Our Sense
of Values." A special music program
has been arranged for this occasion
in which Mr. William Wheeler and
Miss Marian Struble, both of the
Schol of Music faculty, will assist.
Tomorrow morning following a re-
port of the committee on credentials
a paper will be read by Regent Junius
E. Beal, of Ann Arbor on "Fuel as a
Factor in Home Building." Then a
paper on "The Assured Savings Plan"
will be read by Wm. H. Peck, of Kal-
amazoo, and one on "The Retail Lum-
ber Business" by A. J. Hager of Lan-
sing, and president of the Michigan
Retail: Lumber Dealers association.
Discussions will follow - all of the
papers.
Will Elect Officers for Year
In the afternon reports of the va-
rious committees will be heard and
all unfinished business and new bus
ness taken up. Officers for -the fol-
lowing year will be nominated and the
convention city for next year select-
ed. Also the reception comittee,
consisting of Mrs. Marion L. Bur-
ton, Mrs. Horatio J., Abbott, Mrs.
Frank E. Royce, and Mrs. Carl W.
Rufus, will give a tea and reception
for the wives of the delegates at
Foster's.
TRUEBLOOD TO GIVE
T ALK ON PHILLIPS
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, A. M.,
Lit. D., of the department of public
speaking, will give a lecture on "Wen-
dell Phillips, Type of Modern Ora-
tor," in University Hall 'Tuesday ev-
ening, at 7:30 o'clock. There will be
no admission charge and all students
of public speaking are urged to at-
tend. Visitors will be welcome. The
lecture will be over by 8:30 so that
those having other engagements will
not be inconvenienced.
Professor Trueblood is choosing
Phillips as an example of the perfect
type of public speaker, and will tell
of the standards and ideals for which
the modern speaker should strive.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

PERSONS ARREST EIF 1 MUST FACE
TRIAL BEI'lt d EJUDGE
OR JiY
Punishment and the penalties or'
fines for the violationof the new traf-
Lie ordinance has been a topic ofI
some discussion among Ann ArborI
citizens since the drive for better traf-
fic conditions has been on. Accord-
'ing to Judge John 17. Thomas, Justice
of the Police court of Ann Arbor, the
treatment of all vioators will be as
follows: "If a person pleads guilty
to a charge of speediigg, reckless driv-
ing, three-in-the-front-seat, etc., he is
given the choice of' a trial before
Judge Thomas or before a jury. If
the Jerson apprehended is well-
known to the judge;;he is instructed
to appear at a certain date for trial.
If unkown or consideled irresponsible
he is required to give bail in an
amount varying with the character of
the charge."
According to section 16, a person
pleading guilty may be fined not ex-
ceeding 25 dollars and, costs, or upon
inability to pay the fine, he may be
sentenced to not more than ten days
in the county jail.
ADELPHI TO START
MEETINGS TONIGHT
Adelphi House of Representativesa
will hold its first meeting of the year
at its rooms on the fourth floor of Uni-
versity hall tonight at 7:30 o'clock. All
members and all persons interested in
public speaking are urged to be present
at this meeting. First year men also
are invited.
Adelphi is planning an intensive pro-
gram for the coming year and it is att
this meeting that the work will be put
under way. One of the most important
things is the nominationof a president,
as John Gould, '24L, who was elected
president last year, is not in school-
this year.
Chimes Needs BusinesĀ§ Tryouts
Students wishing to tryout for the
Chimes business staff are requested to
report at the Press building between
two and five o'clock any afternoon.
Thosehentering their first semester
where this fall are ineligible; but sec-
ond semester Freshmen and Sopho-
miores are urged to report.
Michigan Daily and Chines for .$4.50.
IBE
} A
* g

BORDEN WILL OPEN
LECTURE PRO GRAM'
CANADIAN STATESMAN TO GIVE
FIRST AIMMItSS OF TIS
YEAR'S SERIES
Sir Robert Laird Borden, Canadian
statesman, legislator, and eminent
war leader, will open this year's ora-
torical program at 8 o'clock Friday
night in Hill auditorium when e
speaks on "Political Development
among the English Speaking Peoples."
Sir Robert was premier of Canada
during the entire war period and won
recognition as one of the foremost
leaders in war affairs in Canada. It
was his work in the war that elevated
him to the place in world politics that
he now holds.
Sir Robert has not only been
known as a war leader, but he has
distinguished himself as a keen jur-
ist, a shrewd politician, and a great
statesman. Sir Robert Borden has
also served as a delegate at the Paris
Peace conference and at the Wash-
ington conference.
Tickets for the lecture course are
going rapidly, each of the State street
book stores reporting a sale of from
40 to 100sreserved seatsand about
half as many unreserved. The reserv-
ed seat course tickets are $3.00, while
the unreserved are $2.50. A single
admission to the Friday night lec-
ture is $1.00.
LAB. COATS
WACr1IE&COMPANY4
Jo hc c 3 050nc ,f4g

DR. C. G. WILCOTT CONFINED |
TO HOME AFTER OPERATION
Dr. Charles G. Wolcott, member of
the University Health Service staff
is still confined to his home after a
serious illness of two months. He
will be unable to continue his Health
Service duties or to make any calls
during the first semester.
Dr. Wolcott was camp physician at
Camp Davis, Cheboygan, this summer
until Aug. 1, when he was forced to
return to Ann Arbor for a surgical
operation.
R. 0, To C. STAR1TS
WITH RECORD ROLLĀ«
TWO NEW COURSES OFFERED TO
STUDENTS OF MILITARY
SCIENCE
Regular classes in the courses in
military science and tactics began
yesterday, with the largest enroll-
ment since the organization of the
Reserve Officers Training Corps. No
figures can be given out yet, said
Major Robert Arthur, offic'er in
charge, since new men are enrolling
every day and will be for some time.
One addition, military telephone,
which will be given for the signal
corps freshmen next spring, has been
made to the curriculum. One courset
for seniors, course 27, Minor Tactics,
will also be given for the first time.
Courses 6 and 7 will be interchanged,
course 6 to be taken in the first se-
mester instead of the second semes-
ter of the junior year.
Two new members have been added
to the staff, Capt. H. P. Faust, a grad-
uate of West Point, will instruct
freshmen classes. He was engaged
as R.O.T.C. summer camp instructor
in coast artillery.'
Captain W. C. Louisell, who is a

graduate of the Alabama Polytechnic
institute, comes directly from the
United States infantry school at Camp
Denning, Va. ,During the summer he
was infantry director at Camp Cus-
ter. He will instruct sophomore and
junior infantry classes.
Street Paving to be Finished Soon
Asphalt will'be laid on the uncom-
pleted portion of State street begin-
ning Monday. After State street is
finished, the contractors will finish
paving Hill street. Packard street
will also be completed within a shor't
time.
Included in this construction pro-
gram, is the laying of a 48-inch sewer
on Woodlawn, Packard, Wells, and
Forest streets, which is three-fourths
completed.
AT THE THEATERS
TODAY--SCREEN.
Arcade-"Fools First, a Mar-
shall Neilan production; com-
edy and news.'
Majestic-"The Valley of Silent
Men," a Curwood story; Bus-
ter Keaton in "Cops."
Orpheum-"Queen o' the Turf";
comedy and news.
Wuerth-George Arliss in "The 1
I Ruling Passion;" and comedy.
TOI)AY-STAGE.
Whitney-Sousa and his band,
8:15 o'clock.
Garrick (Detroit)---Nora Bayes
in "Queen of Hearts."
Shubert Michigan (Detroit)-
The Bonstelle Company in
"The Enchanted Cottage.
ADRIAN, - ANN ARBOR
BUS LINE
Leaing Hours From Ann Arbor
Central Standard Time
X I) S
8:45 A.M.
4:40 P.M. 12:45 P.W 6:45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. H. ELLIOTT, PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-M

w
c.

ALL WE ASK

Eat here once and if you aren't a r
ular customer we'd like to know

reason why,

I
'.'
S h _,

Goo a room to rent? A Daily classi- Lose something? A
fied ad will find a roomer.-Adv. the Daily will find it.-

HOME-MADE PIES AND CAKES

H1

FOREST LUNCH

HOME COOKING

Open till 12:30.

Delivery at nigi

538 FOREST

PHONE 1526-M

"QUARTERBACK"
An Indoor Football Game
A game of foot-ball may be played indoors if you

own a set of "Quarterback.'

This game follows

0 1

accurately official foot-ball rules and is instructive

as well as amusing.

' !

For dessert this noon :

"Quarterback" gives "inside" of football general-

Baked Apple with
Whipped, Cream I15c

ship and is endorsed by all leading coaches.
an alive, up-to-date-20th Century Game.

It is

FINISH your luncheon this
noon with one of these big,
luscious apples, done to a turn
in the old New England man-
ner, with a syrup of pure sugar
baked to a delicious brown
crust. And topped with rich,
heavy whipped cream! 15c.
Without the cream, 12c.

Attraction
Extraordinary
DEMILLE'S
Thomas
Meighan
Lois Wilsuia
Lecatrice Joy
Jnquestionaby y n
achievement in-7'
the motion pictur-e
industry i1t ib o u t
eqfual, ipast or present.

.

LET US SHOW IT TO YOU

THE PRICE IS
Ma2i Floor Annex

df

l

VIOLIN CLASS

OPEN FOR A FEW PUPILS
Ilex Moule, 'Violinist
Graduate of May Leggett Abel
Pupil of
Leopold Auer and Victor Kuzdo
Make appointments at
632 OAKLAND AVENUE
Ann Arbor.

Michigan
Cafeteria

Nov you cal$ get this

1I1

612 East Liberty

h v

b l

Satin

Pumps.

with lacquer-red barrel
and native Iridivm point
Guaranteed 25,Years
Y PRODUCING Dugfold Jr. and Lady Duofold,
Geo. S. Parker has granted the plea of those who have
wanted this black-tipped,lacquer-red pen in a model smaller
than the Over-size Duofold. And the price is only $5. Except
for size, they're exactly like the $7 Duofold -the' classic
25-year Pen that has taken America by storm.
Don't try to form an opinion of the Duofold by any other
pen. When you see this soft,translucent lacquer-red you'll
recognize something handsomer than gold.
In the Duofold pen,with a point like a smooth jewel bear
ing, Mr. Parker has achieved what is virtually writing
without effort! It is balanced with such scientific precision
that it glides, under your sub-conscious direction, of its
own weight!
One college store's record shows that students average four ordi-
nary pens a year. Don't you agree that Duofold is far the most econom-
ical when The Parker Pen Co. guarantees this point 25 years for wear
and mechanical perfection? Come in and get one on 30 days' trial.
Money back if you are not delighted.

HERS

i
I
I
i

FOR WOMEN

_

Good Food
Well Cooked,

"**a
e "
.. "
ee e

Skinner s

Satin

Press the but-
ton and Do
fold drinks its
fill. No pump or
lever to catch
on the clothing L:k ~
'~and spill Ink.

What other
pen would you
dare to lend?
Duofold holds its
original point
regardless of
who writes.

with Baby Louis

A pump of

Heel for

Dress

or Street Wear

Service

a la

carte.

$6.00

Open

7:00

a. m.

to

7:30 p.
meal

m.

Enjoy

*a
ti N 1'
sI I
t 0 !
1 {

LUCKY-CURVE
mar e
The 25 YearPen

time at

1 j1

I

II

I hi

fluoto d J. 46* adv Dtfl.,g.EAc

l u -

f .

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