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October 03, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

117

4ICHIGA

I-

Ll.. L

Sut inut
EWSHOPS

W.

Work on New Engineering Structure}
Is Nevertleless Rapidly
Progressing
EQUIPMENT OF LABORATORY
WiLL ASSIST IN RESEARCH
Although the new engineering
shops and laboratories building has
been delayed in its program by a
shortage of steel from two to three l
weeks, according to Prof. John F.
Shepard, supervisor of the building
plans, the structure is taking a shape
indicative of the future appearance
and arrangement of the rest of the
building.
This building is the largest of, the
structures being , erected at the pres-
ent time and will house laboratories
and shops of the Engineering col-
lege. With the completion of this
buil'ding the positioni of Michigan
as one of the greatest centers of re-
search in the country is assured. The
new building neasures 223 by 190
feet, and will be four stories high.
Install Wind Tunnel,
In the basement will be accommo-
dated many laboratories for engineer-
ing research and various equipment
for the department of aerodynamics.
Theoutstanding piece of apparatus in
this -section will be the double return
wird tunnel, the third to be con-
structed in the world and the first to,
be built in the United States.
Through this device an air speed of
more than 8-0 miles per hour can be
maintained, but with the smaller tun-
nel it is expected an air speed of ap-
, )roxiimately 500 miles an hour will be

developed. These tunnels will be
used to test various types of air-I
planes constructed in exact minia-
ture of the full sized planes and to
find -but the properties of different
struts and other aerofoils.
The center of interest on the first
floor will be the large lobby fitted up
and used as a museum where exhibits
of typical specimens of work relat-
ed to the departmental investigations
will be shown. To the front and to
the left of this lobby will be located
the Davis Highway library, while on
the right of this library will be in-
cluded an additional research labor-
atory. Machine shops and offices will
occupy the south wing behind the
laboratory.
Plait Industrial Research
Industrial research work in engi-
neering fields will be largely carried
on throughout the laboratories on the
second fluor, but this level will also
include offices and classrooms rang-
ing along the front of the building.
The second floor wing will house the
wood-working shops, with chemical
engineering laboratories and offices
occupying the north wing where spe-
cial laboratories will be employed for
such investigations as those in paper
pulp and motor fuels.
Across the front of the third floor
will extend a series of smaller labor-
atoric.s and offices occupying a part'
of the building directly in front of the
main engineering library located at'
the base of the "U". Preparation of
clays and ceramics will be done in a
laboratory in the front part of the
third floor south wing, while - forge
and machine shops will center the
rear of this wing.
Study Paints, Varnishes
On this floor's north wing certain,
laloratories for chemical technology
and chemical engineering will be"
placed. Here studies in the special-
ized fields of paints, dyes, textil es,
;v7rnisho, electrochemistry wlil be
accomplished in the smaller labora-
tories. A file room, seminar, class-
rooms and the Chemical Engineering
society's headquarters will fill the rest
of the floor.
The chemical engineering depart-
ment together with its offices will be
located in the front and north wing
of the top floor. The south wing will
take care of the foundry and its re-
search laboratories. With the instal-
lation of a series of electric furnaces
at the base of the "U" on this floor
much advanced work in metals will
be. done. ti is expected that th~e
building will be completed and ready
for occupancy slightly more than' a
year and a half from now.
EXTENSION COURS S hAVE
LARGE DEMAND IN STATE

JOB SITUATION ON l
CAMPUS IMPROVING
The student employment situationI
is gradually clearing up as more oddl
jobs are listed and more men are be-
ing placed every day.
Many students still are seeking em-
2ulisi
326 Eas

ployment but the numberis diminish-
steadily. Kinds of positions boing
taken are varied. Yesterday one man
accepted a. job removing wallpaper
for a landlady about to redecorate. A
few steady positions are being offer-
ed, and are being filled as fast as
discovered. Within the course of at
few weeks, if the situation improves
st Ann.

at the present rate, the difficulty
should be well cle'ared.
WILL ElNFO1,t 'E A1UT() LA I
AFTER )lEETIN K TODAY
(Continued from Page One)
"The A B C of Safety First"-L. A.
Butler, superintendent of public

schools, "Safety First Education in
Public Schools," Miss Harriet E.
Beard, supervisor of the department
of safety education of the Detroit pub-
lic schools, "Automobile and Pedes-
trian Traffic Accidents in Detroit," In-
spectord Harry Jackson, "Safety First
for4 Pedestrians," Captain W. S. Gil-'
breath. L. A. Wikel will again pre-
side at this meeting.

A

I

every Friday. Tice's Drug Sto
S. Main.-Adv.

October
should mean

remedies for roughened

Good Saddle Horses

Good Rates

TIE TIME
I ~ Is P HO NE 8 7 OIE

C -"n'
. If t e r

every

meal

hands or face.
The weather has

ha
!

Just a complete and odern

Metal Service

One five cent pacage o Wriey's
e6ntafns a enefill fe dne
treat for the whole famiy.
It gives' delight antd keps ''eeth
white. It"s a satlsfyhg sweet.
rr ey"S Is cieansing, oolcgand
soothing to mouth. Andathroat.
Lasts long- costs little-does m uch.

that we are selling

thus far been
'so delightful

French Toilet Ponders
and Lotions.

SCHLENKER'S HARDWARE
"Serbice for Patronage"

TRY US
213-15 W. LIBESTY ST.

PRICES RIGHT
Establshed 1886 PHONE 554

Dermnal

Creamn

e

w '. i 5

p
i
.
,k
'
t

f

Wrigley's Is made clean and comes
to you clean, wholsoaeand k .ull of
flavor in Its wax wrapped package.4

works

all

rf

Mr. ARTHUR M. ROSENBERG

It

Representing

The Arthur M. Rosenberg Co.
TAILORS - NEW HAVEN, CONN.

Save the
loth

" "1 & , N'Y' FLT
. Q. S Y yr
xylo1 * 1wvic rY ' 2. *li

weathers.

ha

WRIGLEY' jr K.i is. A.. ue
new sugar-jacketed gum.
Al Wrigley's benefits
and an extra treat for your
"sweet tooth."

' .,.

"The Quarry"
Drut and Prescription Store
6. CLAUDE DRAKE

I

-
-
reident llard ng as 'nan.c,
Attorney Edwin P. Parker, Hous-
ton, Tex., as the American memher
of -the Amriwican-Grn ar claims
Ommni ion which will h ..c cont rol
of the disp p sa of claims for 'O.
twen u "S ,00 000 a $90,0 W.Olf
arising out of the war.

(Continued from Page One)
by Mr. Cahow of the economics fac-
ulty.
Credits earned-in extension courses
will count toward an A. B. degree,
each course giving two hours credit.
A fee of eight dollars per course will
be charged- and all students taking
the course are required to pay -the
fee, whether their work is to apply to-
ward credit or not.
In selecting men for the extension
work, particular care is taken in
choosing men who, in addition to be-
ing trained teachers, are exceptional-
ly well fitted for the courses which
they are to teach. The extension
classes will meet one evening each
week for a period of two hours. In
general no instructor has charge of
more than one two hour course each
yea:.
i B
a U
2'i
JMNLt

Will exhibit their samples and materials
of fall and winter fabrics

Thney are Brood for valuable
premiums

y
r'te'' I e o
CHE _qun

Tomorrow

October 4

v*ww4w--"

I!

ALLENEL HOTEL

PROPRIETOR
Phonue 3098

I

CHORAL

U-NION



-.A

.._

/'/
*1

i
1

co

Ill Auditorium

" AnnArbor

CERT..%M

Typed Papers
Always Score
with the "Prof"

I

They save his time
They save your time,
too.

and-that's important.
and that's important

RUSSIAN
OCTOBER 24-MISCHA -ELMAN0 L I N Is T
In spite of the many wonderful violinists which have won distinction during
recent years, Elman stil1 retains his position as a leader of them all. He is a stupen-
dous artist who always pleases.
OPERATIC STAR
NOVEMBER 10-MARY GARDEN anRd S I STERA
America's best known opera singer will make her Ann Arbor debut. She dl
be assisted by Gutia Casini, 'Cellist, and Isaac VanGrove, Pianist.
W0RLD'S GREATEST-.
JANUARY 8-PADEREWSKI P 1 A Ni S T
Poland's statesman who after a recess of several years will resume his artistic
career. He has said "Hill Auditorium is the finest hall in the world," and he ought
to know.
JANUARY,24-THE OPERA "IMPRESARIO" (MOZART)
Percy Hemus with an all-American cast, directed by William Wade Hinshaw,
will present this attractive musical opera. Elaborate stage hangings and costumes will
add to the musical offerings.
FEBRUARY 13-UKRAINIAN NATIONAL CHORUS
Alexander Koshetz, Director; Oda Slobodskaja, Prima Donna of the Petrograd
Opera, and Nina Koshetz, Prima Donna of the Moscow Opera, soloists; 40 singers in
costume who will appear in choral and operatic roles.
MARCH 9-GUY MAIER AND LEE, PATTISON
These famous American artists have won a unique position in the musical
world as exponents of two piano recitals. Their attractive programs have made a
deep impression in New York, Boston and other music centers.
COURSE TICKETS may be ordered by mail - $450,. $5.00, $5.50, $6.00
(Patrons Tickets, first choice 'up to October 7, $7-0O). Orders filed in order of receipt.
Concerts. begin at 8 o'clock Eastern Standard time. Interurban cars leave auditorium after
all concerts.

We welcome the change in the

mode

makes all writing swift and easy.
It is the most complete ofall po table type-
writers-has the STANDARD KEYBOARD
and all the familiar features of the
big machines. And it is so com-
pact that it fits in a case only four
inches high. Price, complete with
case, $60.

which makes it

possible for a man to

secure shirting patterns less mindful of
the rainbow than those worn during the

price bloated days.

A very modest sum

0

now secures a finely tailored Arrow Shirt
in which the fabric, the workmanship

and the style form well melded points
,fValhale.
We are pleased to announce full stocks of
soft white shirts, collar attached, al
sleeve lengths 32 to 35

I

NATIONAL TYPISTS ASSOCIATION

0

d"o i v
.. ;

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