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October 01, 1922 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MICE

.N DAILY

ARBOR KIGK STRTS MARCH
TOWARD TITLE WITK INITIWIN

Unliversity of Detroit Preps
fore Onslaught of
Purple

Fall Be-!

Story of the Game

STORNE, CATHOLIC TACKLE,
DISPLAYS REMARKABLE GAME
Fighting against a more experienc-
ed team and outweighed more than 10
pounds to the man the University of
Detroit High football team was de-
feated 14 'to 0 Saturday afternoon at
Wines field.
From the sound of the initial whis-
tle until after the second touchdown
was made' Ann Arbor high outplayed
the visitors in every department of the
game. When the second half opened
it was readily seen that the Detroit
coach had made good uses of his time
between halves for .'the UniversityI
High men fought Ann Arbor to a
standstill, although the latter rallied
at the close of the fourth quarter andt
nearly, put over a touchdown.i
Passes Good

The summary follows: Ain Arbor
kicked off and soon took the ball
away from Detroit. Ann Arbor opened
up immeditely and by a series of snap-'
py plays and a shoe string pass went
over the goal line for the initial
Itouchdown. Detroit was iihable to
solve the Ann Arbor attack. Every
|time the Detroit aggregation 'opened
up they were stopped immediately and
when they recived a kick were'downed
in their tracks, so wvell did tlie Ann

Ann Arbor's possession. Score 14 to
Kicks Exchanged
Ann Arbor ran the ends and then
punts were exchanged. The Detroit
ends covered their men well as the
purple at this period of the game.
Storne seemed to gain strength with
overy play and threw the Ann Arbor
backfield men for losses repeatedly.
The linliversity lads also began to
break ni the Ann Arbor aerial attack
consistently. Punts were exchanged
and the Detroit receiver fumbled al-
lowing Nelson, Ann Arbor's end, to fall
on the ball within 5 yards of the goal
line. Detroit, held Ann Arbor for
downs and the ball went over.
Storne kicked the oval more than 40
yards, but Neff replied with a long
pass and the game ended with Ann Ar-

ji
J
1
I
1
7
' f

Arbor ends cover the opposing back- bor on the Detroit 3 yard line.
field. Score 7 to 0. Lineup:
At the opening of the second quar- Ann Arbor Detroit
ter Detroit gained 15 yards in an ex- -Nelson-.....................'Ma-iere
change of punts and seemed to be Seyfreid.........L. T......... Storne
about to begin to carry the fight into Parker.......... L. G...... P. Sweeney
Ann Arbor's territory, but they soon Naury ........... C. .....T. Sweeney
fumbled the ball and. Ann Arbor, after Hall............ R. G.......... Revaid
several delays, took up the victorious Pommerening...R. T......McCallister
march toward another touchdown via Smith,. .........R. E.......... Cahon
the aerial route. Gauss was injected Neff. .............Q. ........Griffen
into the game at this time anti began Walsh..........A.L. H......... Doetsch
to make the spectators sit up and take Staebler......... R. H............ . Hill
notice with the gains he mde ,around Lichtenau...F.... B.......... O'Lary
Detroit's ends. Referee, Mitchell, U. of M.; Umpire,
Detroit received the kickoff and at- McCulloch, Michigan State; N6rmal;
ternpted some line asbutras soori Head Linesinan, C. P. Stremle.

the state title. Union has 9 letter
men in the squad.
Pontiac, the plucky eleven that for
a time last year threatened much
larger schools about the state, is
back with the same spirit this sea-
son.Thesteam is up against some of
the hardest elevens in the high school
class. Battle Creek is playing such
teams as Jackson, Arthur Hill, Lan-
sing and Detroit Western.
Port Huron has 8 letter men back
in the lineup this year. The team has
what is considered a hard schedule.
Intramural Items
Matches in the first round of the
fall tennis tournament are to be
played off immediately. The follow-
ing have been drawn and the results
must be in to the intramural office in
Waterman gymnasium by Friday noon,.
Oct. 6. The phone number of the office
is 2268.1
T. E. Hoffman, 173, vs. H. A. Cash,
1985; H. L. White, 3525J, vs. H. H.
Passolt, 1719R; E. B. Ornstein, 2801W1
vs. S. Bielfield, 951M; J. McKnight,
1597M, vs. E. F. Wollin, 2.105W; G.
Upjohn, 374, vs. H. B. Ross, 243J; M.
Rush, 951M, vs. A. Levy, 2871; M. D.
Stein, 2444J, vs. J. P. Vose; A. J.
Armstrong, 909, vs. G. C. Vose; H.
Lightbody, 1505, vs. N. Dreyfuss; S.
Millet, 871M, vs, P. P. Perry, 131; M.
D. Schuster, 240M, vs. H. H. Mudd,
1121R; G. Richard, ,871M, vs. R. J.
Roth, 371; B. Segal, 751W, vs. I. Gutov,
2499; C. L. Briggs, 2738; vs. H. F.
Dembrufsky, 2299W; H. E. 'Bryan,
941J, vs. R. E. 'Wright, 2480J; E. J.
Elliot, 371, vs. R. H. Crane, 2127M.

series of letters to former players ti-prohibitionists, was that in
now in school and to fraternities and Sweden went dry there would
independent organizations has brought heavy loss of revenue from ]
the required results.
It is the hope of the coaches that IEsE!I3ENrE ilUEEEEEiWE
the men now in uniform will continue IA
to report to practice regularly and it Are You a C
will be necessary for them to do this,wI
the coaches say, if the Michigan Vars- IF SO,"
ity is in proper condition by, the time 1n
of the Ohio State game Oct. 21. r-r .

SWEDEN'S LIQUOR INCOME
HELPS DEFE AT PROIII1BIT I ON
Stockholm, Sept. 30.-Sweden's in-
.ome from liquor trade taxes during
1922 will be over 121,000,000 kronor, or
more than $32,000,000, according to
official reports just published by the
Liquor Control Board. One of the ar-
guments used by "wets" in the recent
prohibition referendum in Sweden,
which rsulted in a victory for the an-
IDEIS PEN SHOP FOR
08 . State St.
Holds a Whole Barrel Full of Ink
Not a Barrel Full of Trouble
FROM FACTORY DIRECT TO YOU!

case taxes, and that othE
be a hight have to be sur
liquor up the deficit.

AT LANE HALL
LUNCH AND DINNER
$5.75 per week
OR
INDIVIDUAL MEALS

THEN EAT AT
( 9

GOOD

MUSIC EVERY EVENING
- - 5:30to 6:30--3----

onnoisseur of Food?

Q -QUALITY S
FUs

Forward passes were Ann Arbor'ts
pest bet, the Neff to Walsh and the
Neff to Gauss combination~s working
to perfection almost every time. Lich-
tenau fought hard while he was in
and ran rampant through Detroit's
line at imes. Gau'ss made several fine
end runs when he followed his inter-
feence. Nelson, Ann Arbor's negro
star, was a stalwart bulwark that was
always in the way when Detroit at-
acked the left side of the line. He
Also was responsible for the breaking
p of several of Detroit's forward
'passes.

s
k
;
i

7
' f

forced to kick to Neff, who returned
the ball five yards before he was
stopped. Gauss pulled off several
plays, the Neff to Walsh combination
working well. Ann Arbor worked
down to the three yard line and was all
set to go over for a touchdown when
the whistle sounded for the half.

MANY HIGH SCHOOLS
SHOBW BRIGRT PROSPECTS

Storne Stars
Storne was almost the whole of
Detroit's defense, often running from
behind and getting the Ann Arbor
runne-r when he. had broke away from
the rest of his teammates. His tac-
kling was vicious at times and hard-
ly a miss was- registered against, him.
Oftentimes he thkew the Ann Arbor
runners for big losses behind their
line. Sullivan and McCallister were
also line luminaries for Detroit, fight-
'mg hard throughout the whole game.
THIS
COLUMN LA S'
CLOSES r
AT 3 P.M. ADVER
MICHIG
Classified Rates. Two Cents perv
imum charge for first day, 25c.
cents per word per day if charged
of 5c per agate line. Classified, ch
Liner Rates: Twelve cents per lin
PHO1

Detroit's --aii iijeced a bit of -- (By Associated Press)
into his warriors and when\ t Jicked Detroit, Sept. 30.-High school foot-
off to Ann Arbor they held the latter ball teams throughout the state yes-
for downs, the first time in thegame. terday faced their first real taste of
Detroit soon kicked. On the play the season, in many instances. Al-
Gregory, Ann Arbor, broke through though some of the school grid war-
and apparently had a clear field to riors were in action last Saturday the
the goal for a touchdown. Storne tilts largely were of the practice va-
came up from behind with . a great riety. Yesterday's games were ex-
burst of speed and tackled the runner pected to show, to a certain. degree,
15 yards from the line. Ann Arbor the trend of the state championship
punted and Detroit opened with an ' race, as well as the ultimate battles'
aerial attack that brought a first down. for a number of district honors.
Detroit fumbled and Ann Arbor kicked The training season in the high
being held. for downs again. The school division this year has been
quarter ended with ball in mid-field in marked by reporting of an unusually
large number of experienced players.!
With interest in football growingr
steadily in Michigan each year, and
THIS the present season promising unus-
1, iMN ually good football on the part of the
CLOSES many teams, the coming period should
see the game more strongly en-
TI SINGAT 3 PA trenched in public favor than ever
before, according to observers.
Both Saginaw teams will make a
A.N DAILY determined bid for the state cham-
pionship. Arthur Hill has a fairly
word a' day, paid in advance. Min- heavy squad, while Saginaw Eastern
Minimum thereafter, 20c. Three is specially strong, with the greater
. White space charged for atrate number of its players men of experi-
harged only to those having phones. ncm erfi plays six stroxpehih
e, without contract, paid in advance. epee. Eastern plays six strong high
NE 960 school teams this year. l

PLEA FOR RESERVES SHOWS
RESULTS; NEED MORE TRYOUTS
(Continued from Page One) j
places are open to the man possessing
the most ability.
"Coach Fisher has charge of the re-
serve squad and has one assistant
coach who has been out since thq
reserve squad has 'been increased.
Other assistant coaches will be se-
cured if the group increases to a
sufficient number to warrant it."
Coach Ray Fisher praised especially
the spirit shown by his team. "There
are men on the field," he said, "that
have either never played football in
their lives or that have played on a
mighty small high school team, and
yet they are fighting like veterans."
Campaign Brings Results
The fine showing made by the re-
serves in yesterday's scrimmage is
attributed directly' to the campaign
that has been carried on by those in
charge of the team. Due to the lack
of players, scrimmage was postponed
several days ago, and the need of men
made the campaign a necessity. A
DAILY TRYOUTS WANTED

ADRIAN ANN ARBOR
BUS LINE
Leaving Hours From Ann Arbor
Central Standard Tine
X D S
8:45 A.M.
4:40 P.M. 12:45 P.M. 6:45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays1
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. H. ELLIOTT, PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-M

ELECTRIC STUDYLAMPS

RAZORS AND

tudent Supplies

RAZOR STROPS
WASTE 'BASKETS
SMOKE STANDS
ASH TRAYS
CALIPERS
STEEL RULES
MACHINIST HAMMERS
BRASS BOUND RULES
SHAVING CREAM
LATHER BRUSHES
SHAVING MUGS
SEE OUR MAIN STREET
WINDOW DISPLAY

ALARM CLOCKS

SUNDAY-TUESDAY
"QUEEN
of the

TURF"

JN
4 QUALITY.
.z.
0
V Q1
*:~~ ~S l

0. C. FISHER CO

.

Up - Thefin uateHardware
Main Noar Wash. ,Wash. Near Main

a

ICI \:

JOE ROCI( COMEDY.

I'

i

r

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Large, clean, well-venti-
lated rooms, newly decorated. New
furniture throughout. Brick house
with steam heat. Centrally ho-
cated atr'333rE,d.Huron. Married
couples preferred. 7-2
STUDENT ROOMS for rent. Just
being furnished with new beds.
Four double rooms at reasonable
prices. One block from campue.
908 Monroe St. Phone 2563-R. 5-3
FOR RENT-Three suites to six stu-
dents at $3 each. Also board. Two
meals $5, three meals $6 per week.
Mrs.nBeb ut, 302 N. Fifth Ave.
Phonae 934-R. 5-3
FOR RENT-One excellent, extra
large, well-furnished double room
for two men. It will pay you to in-
vestigate. Everything brand new.
301 E. Liberty. : 7-3
FOR RENT-Room for two and room-
mate wanted in new house. Shower,
steam heat, dormitory and sleeping
porch. Also garage for rent. At
736 Forest Ave. 6-2
FOR RENT-Double' room for stu-
dents or business man. Hot water
heat, electric light. $3 each. 921
W. Huron St. Phone 1195W. 5-3
FOR RENT--Rooms for men. Also
roommate wanted. 'Steam heat.
Plenty of hot water. Phone 1194-M.
422 E. Washington. 5-3
FOR RENT-One suite and one double
or single room for students. All
modern. Good heat. Phone 2420-J
or 337 E. William St. 7-2
FOR RENT-Rooms; 'two front single
rooms or. one suite; newly decor-
ted. 445 S. Fourth Ave. Phone 1772-3.
6-3
FOR RENT-Two suites for boys; one
suite for light housekeeping on first
floor. 914 S. State. Phone 2801-M.
7-3
SINGLE Southeast room. Plenty sun-
light, ,complete furnishings, bath.
Good location. Apply 806 Arch. 7-1
MOR RENT-Furnished lower duplex.
First class in every particular. Ref-
erences required. Phone 2458-J. 7-1
FOR RENT-Two rooms furnished for
light housekeeping. 517 E. Cather-
ine St. Phone 2554-R. 7-1
FOR RENT-One large suite with
sleeping porch. 739 E. University.

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Near campus, a. large
suite on first floor. Phone 2624-M.
7-1
'WANTED
WANTED-Every student 'ho ex-
pects to rent a typewriter during the
school year to wait until Monday,
Oct. 2, when Mr. Moran's office, room
2, second floor, 711 N. University
Ave., will be open and some bar-
gains in T. W. rentals and sales
will be offered. 4-4
READER WANTED-About two hours
a day. The reading will be mainly
in Shakespeare 'and Shakespeare
criticism. Only persons specializ-
ing in English or Comparative Lit-
erature need apply. For further in-
formation, 'call 243-J from 2 to 5
'o'clock. 7-1
WANTED-Roommate. Junior or civil
engineer prefered. $3. 921 W.
Huron St., Phone 1195-W. 5-3
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Cheap; six-cylinder Over-
land touring car in excellent me-
chanical condition. Self-starter.
Five good tires. Call 1104. 7-1
FOR SALE-.32 Smith and Wesson
hammerless; brand new condition.
$10.00. E. D. Blain, 1213 S. State St.
6-2
RADIO SET-Single Circuit regener-
ative, neatly encased. $20.: 7-2
FOR SALE-Rudd Automatic Heater.
$50.00. Phone Booth 2666. 6-21
LOST
LOST-Silver Fountain Pen. Initials
F. L. 'A. Return to 1145 Washtenaw.
Reward.. , 6-3
LOST-During last May Festival,
Michigan gold, seal ring. H. T.
care Daily. 7-3
LOST-In Engineering Building, a!
slide rule. Call Mac, 1901-J. 7-1
LOST-Scotch Collie Puppy (male).
Finder please call 231. Reward. 7-2.
MISCELLANEOUS
LARGE well furnished double room.
$6.00. Seven houses south o).
campus. Phone 1602-W. 637 Oak-
land Ave. 6-2
E. NORMANTON BILBIE, teacher of
violin. niano. and harmony. Studio.,

Lansing has 10 letter men to start
operations. Kalamazoo has 6 veterans
and faes a hard schedule.
Grand Rapz utt n is shy of older
men, but has hopes of being in the
fight before the season is half over.
Prospects at.Grand Rapids Union1
never have been brighter since 1919,
when the school played Lansing for

Men wishing to try out for
the business staff of The Michi-
igan Daily may come to the
business office Monday after-
noon from 1 to r5 o'clock. First
semester Freshmen are inelig-
ible.

CHORL

UNION

WAITERS' COATS
VAN BOVEN AND CRESS
1107 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE

co

CFRT

I

si

Hill Auditorium

::Ann Arbor

I

OCTOBER2

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,a, ,
t
,-
' ,,;
.
:
-
,

RU SSIA*-
24-MISCHA ELMAN VILIN IT
In spite of the many wonderful violinists which have won distinction during
recent years, Elman Mill retains his position as at leader of them all.. He is a stupen-
dous artist who always pleases.

I

Welcome!

To the New and the Old Girls

We wish to welcome back the
old girls and to introduce our-
selves to the new.
Our stock of new Fall suits,
coats, dresses and accessories is
as complete as we can make it.
We will be glad to serve you

OPER ATIC STAR
NOVEMBER 10-MARY GARDEN a n d S1IN 0 E R
America's best known opera singer will make her Ann Arbor debut. She will
be assisted by Gutia Casini, 'Cellist, and Isaac VanGrove, Pianist.
WORLD'S G REATEST
JANUARY 8-PADER EWSKI R I A N I S T
Poland's statesman who after a recess of several years will resume his artistic
career. He has said "Hill Auditorium is the finest hall in the world,'" and he ought
to know.
JANUARY 24-THE OPERA \IMPRESARI0" (I M0Z4T)
Percy Hemus with an all-American cast, directed by William Wade Hinshaw,
will present this attractive musical opera. Elaborate stage hangings and costumes will
add to the musical offerings.
FEBRUARY 13-UKRAINIAN NATIONAL CHORUS
Alexander Koshetz, Director; Oda Slobodskaja, Prima Donna of the Petrograd
Opera, and Nina Koshetz, Prima Donna of the Moscow Opera, soloists; 40 singers in,
costume who will appear in choral and operatic roles.
MARCH 9-GUY MAIER AND LEE PATTISON
These famous American artists have won a unique position in the musical
world as exponents of two piano recitals. Their attractive programs, have iade a
deep impression in New York, Boston and other music centers.
COURSE TICKETS may be ordered by mail - $4.50, $5.00, $5.50, $6.00
(Patrons Tickets, first choice up to October 7, $7.00). Orders filed in order of receipt.
Concerts begin at 8 o'clock Eastern Standard time. Interurban cars leave auditorium after
all concerts.

in any way possible.

Drop in

the next time you are down
town.

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II

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