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October 01, 1922 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
1 11 1 1 1 x

ES HOLD' VARSITY LINEMEN
IN DISAPPOINTING SCRIMMAGE

Fisher's Fighting Scrubs Fling Back
Yost's Best, Allowing But
Two Scores
WOLVERINE BACKS FIND ONLY
STRENGTH IN CIRCLINV ENDS
Playing a brand of football which
again brought out the weakness of the
line the Varsity squads was able to
score only twice upon Coach Fisher's
Reserves in more than an hour's
scrimmage, yesterday afternoon on
Ferry' Field.
The outstanding feature of the work-
out was the inability of the Varsity
line to hold either on offense or de-
fense. Time after time the Reserve
backfield would plunge through the
first team line and only be stopped
by the Varsity secondary defense.
When the Varsity was in possession
of the ball the backfield men would
be stopped almost before they were
started by opposing linemen breaking
through.
Coach Yost's proteges were forced
to play more than three quarters of
an hour before they could cross the
last white line of the Reserves. Then%
1*g
ae
PKR
* DILLIARDS 3
* game. U
* You do not need to be U
* an expert to enjoy it. a
* U
0 BILLIARDS CIGARS CANIES
* PIPES LVNCHES SODAS5
"we tay to treat you right"
v s
SUUUUWUU a E UU aaEUSR8UW

the first touchdown came when Steger,
circled left end on a wide run and:
planted the ball over the goal line.
Knode followed by booting the ball
over the cross bar on the try for goal.
Pass Aids
The second and last touchdown
came a few minutes later when after
a forward pass from Knode to Hen-
derson, right end, netted 30 yards.
Keefer plunged over from the five
yard line. The try for goal failed
when a forward pass was broken up,
making the score 13 to 0 in favor of
the Varsity..
Steger, Keefer and Roby were the
autstanding players for the Varsity.
These three men were compelled to.
resort to end runs mostly because
they were unable to get away on a line
plunge. End running, however, proved
fairly successful and was used quite
frequently by the Varsity.
t Regulars Put
Coach Yost started the scrimmage
with only a few of his regulars from
last year in the game. In the backfield
he used Knode at quarter, in place of
Uteritz who is out with an injured
ankle, Steger and Keefer at the halves
and the veteran Roby at fullback. On
the line Neisch and "Bernie" Kirk
were stationed at the wings. Neisch is
'holding down right end during the ab-
sence of Captain Paul Goebel from the
squad because of injuries. Stan Muir-
head, veteran of last year, held' down
one tackle while the same position on
the other side of the line was filled
by Vandervoort, a member of last
year's freshman squad. Heath and
Rosatti at guards together with
Slaughter made up the center of the
Varsity line.
Subs Look Good
Yostmade several substitutions dur-
ing the course of the scrimmage both
in the line and ,the backfield. Among
those going in later who showed up
to best advantage were Dunleavy, who
took Roby's place at fullback, and
Henderson, who replaced Neisch at
right end. Henderson was to a large
extent responsible for the second
touchdown of the Varsity when he
speared a pass from Knode and
reached the 15 yard line after which
Keefer put it over. Curran, while he
was in the game, and Muirhead both
put up a nice game.
Coach Fisher's men were attired in
red and yellow jerseys in order that
the players on the. opposing sides
might be easily discernable, and also.
that it might add spirit to the first

string men when they saw 'a bunch of
brightly colored jerseys lined' up op-
posite them. A decided opposite ap-
peared to be the result for the Re-
serves certainly had the Indian sign
on the Varsity. Both of the scores came
when the Reserve substitutes had been
put into the game in place of the men
who had started against the first
team.
Fisher Happy
Coach Fisher is quite enthusiastic
over his squad as it is constituted at
present. He has more men out than
ever before and all of them are hard
and willing workers. Some of the
men who were in the fracas yesterday,
had only been out for practice a single
day prior to yesterday, but all of them
were begging to be allowed to enter
the game and help whip the Varsity
into shape.
Among the Reserves who showed up
best against the first string athletes
were Savage and Tracy, who both were
at the quarter position during the
game, Lawson the big Negro fullback,
Elliott, Stegemeier, Bonley Smith and
Ingals.
SECRET PRACTICE ON
SLTIEFOTHSWEEK,

YOST

Iowans Look Forward to Greatest
Team and Possible Win Over Yale

ORDER BARS SPECTATORS
FROM ALL BUT FEW
WORKOUTS

Coach Yost has given the word for
secre.t practice to begin on Ferry field
Monday morning. This means that
from now on, execept for an occa-
sional open scrimmage, the football
team will be locked up with its
coaches and trainers away from the
inquisitive eye of the public until it
makes its initial appearance before
the stands in the first game of the
season.
In speaking of secret practice
Coach Yost said, "In the strict sense
of the word our practices are not se-
cret. This is impossible due to, the
presence of the tennis courts on Fer-
ry field and all of the various Intra-
mural activities going on there. How-
ever, in order to limit as far as possi-
ble the number of bystanders at the
scrimmages we will lock all of the
gates to the field and see that par-
ticipants in other activities stay in
the south section.
In many schools, the coach states,
strict secret practice is carried on
with .absolutely no one permitted to
enter except officials. Thus no out-
sider has a chance to see any forma-
tion or to hear the signals. This the
coach believes to be a desirable al-
though not altogether necessary pre-
caution.

With two men fighting for every
position on the team and a throng of
veterans from last year's champion-
ship eleven on hand, Coach Howard
Jones of Iowa is looking for a con-
ference title again this year. With
Yale to be met this season In one of
the most important intersectional
games in years the Hawkeye candi-
dates are fighting like mad for the
privilege of helping to defend the
honor of the West. Led by Gordon
Locke, one of the greatest fullbacks
in the country, the largest collection
of veterans in Big Ten football this
year is being formed into a well bal-
anced grid machine.
Powerful Line
The line, undoubtedly the strongest
in the conference both on the offensive
and defensive, averaging 190 pounds
to a man with the exception of the
ends. Johnny Heldt will play in the
center of the line, the same position.
whcih, he held down last year. On
either side of Heldt will probably be
Chester Meade and Paul Minnek, both
i of them veteran guards from last,
year's eleven.
Plenty of Tackles
A wealth of wonderful tackles is
making it hard for the coach to de-
cide who will fit into the positions1
best, but it is considered likely that1
left tackle will be held down byi
George Thompson, a player of rarel
ability who was "found" in the Notre
Dame game last year and who has'
been steadily improving under the
guidance of Jones since that time.
Of the three candidates for the other
tackle position who have shown theI
most knack, Karl Engeldinger, Kriz,
and John stone, Engeldinger is fav-
ored for the job. Two years ago he
won his letter at West Point. He is
heavy and good on footwork, and it
is certain that he will be given a
trial during one of the early season
games.'
Ends Only FairI
The ends of the line are not quite
as well fixed as the rest of the teamj
but with Kadsi of last years machine
back and several men showing up
well for the other end it is likely that
the coach will have a smooth pair of
wingmen by the first game of the
season.!
With Captain Locke, V. C. Shuttle-
worth, and "Doc" Miller returned on
their jobs in the backfield, Jones is
having little trouble. Locke is the
Yesterday's Games
American League
Washington 7, 4; Philadelphia 3, 7.
Cleveland 4, Detroit 1.
New York 3, Boston 1.
St. Louis 11, Chicago 7.

most feared of conference fullbacks
and has proven himself fit to captain
the first of middle west football teams
to be given a chance at Yale. Shuttle-
worth and "Doc" Miller are two half-
backs from whom a lot is expected by
the Iowa football fans. Lee Parkin,
a new man, seems to have first call
on the quarterback job. He is a
clever passer and uses a great deal of
headwork in directing the team. With
a possible exception of the right end
and quarterback position there seems
to be no weak spot on the entire.
eleven.
Thenmeeting of Iowa and Yale will
not only be of historical importance
but it will also result in the clash of
two teams coached by brothers who
played side by side at Yale years ago.
The Hawkeye team is one of the best
that has ever worn Iowa's colors and
the result of the contest may be a fair
answer of the time-worn question
is western football superior to east-
ern?
JOHN TROJANOWSKI
SEILS BARBER SHOP
John P. Trojanowski, proprietor of
the Trojanowski barber shop on North
University avenue, announced today
that he would retire from activebust-
ness and with his wife, would shortly
leave Ann Arbor. Mr. Trojanowski
will make his future home in La Feria,
Texas, where he intends to go into
the fruit farming business. The busi-
ness which Mr. Trojanowski has built
up has been bought. by Mr. Arthur A.
Milcer, who has worked for six years
with Mr. Trojanowski.
Mr. Trojanowski has been in active
business in this city since 1895, and
has occupied his present shop for 17
years.
He was largely patronized by stu-
dents, and he leaves behind him a host
of friends among the present student
body and the alumni.
Mr. Milcer, who will take over the
shop on Monday, served with Mr. Tro-
janowski for six years.
CONSIDER EXTRA ALLOWANCES
FOR MARRIED MEN IN ARMY
Washington, Sept. 30.-Extra allow-
ances and ;y for soldiers and sailors
in the service of the United States
who are married is under discussion
in the legislature in Washington.,

Soccer Devotees
Seek Recognition
Soccer has not received much help
toward becoming a minor Varsity'
sport as yet. The enthusiasts are
still very hopeful though that it will
be recognized by the officials in con-
trol of the sport.
The main objection to soccer, be-
coming a minor Varsity sport is the
fact that it Is 'not played very 'much
by the collegesi west of the Alleghan-
ies. Added to this objection is the

All University Students will be allowed to
play Golf on the Washtonaw Country Club
Links during the month of October by pay-
ing greens fee, $1.00 per day.

A

MIMi

FRESHMAN- GYM. SUITS
VAN BOVEN AND CRESS
1107 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE
EAT AT KINC&EY'
$6.00 WEEK FOR ThREE MEALS
$5.00 WEEK FOR TWO MEALS
213 SOUTH, THAYER ST.
PHONE 1884-J
Schumacher Hardware Co.
A STORE OF INDIVIDUAL SHOPS

Sanchez, one of last year's Varsity
tennis stars, intends to put the proo-
sition up to Dr. Sundwall and Ath-
letic Director Yost in a few days and
hopes to get their support.
At the last practice the attendance
was much greater than heretofore. A
team has been selected and 'would
like to schedule a game for this Sat-
urday.

money situation. Director Mitchel
the Intramural department haS
money at his disposal with whict
encourage the sport and without
necessary support it' cannot flout
and no material can be bought.

1

X08-10-12 SOUTH MAIN STREET

PHONES 174 -- 176M

Supplies for Students

i

Extra Concert Series

AT THE THEATERS
TODAY-SCREEN.
Arcade-"Fools First, a Mar-
shall Neilan production; com-
edy and news.
Majestc-"The Valey of Silent
Men," a Curwood story; Bus-
ter Keaton in "Cops."
Orpheum-"Queen o' the Turf";
comedy and news.
Wuerth-George Arliss 1* "The
Ruing Passion;" and comedy.

i

CALIPERS
HAMMERS
BRASS BOUND RULES
SIX-INCH STEEL RULES
LOCKS
POCKET KNIVES
RAZORS
ALARM CLOCKS
RAZOR STROPS
SHEARS
WASTE BASKETS
SAFETY RAZOR BLADES

ELECTRIC LAMPS
ELECTRIC GRILLS
ELECTRIC HEATERS
ELECTRIC CURLING IRONS
ELECTRIC TOASTERS
ELECTRIC IRONS
SMOKE STANDS
ASH TRAYS
PLAYINGCARDS
BRIDGE TABLETS
FOOTBALLS'
SPORTING GOODS

|

In Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor

National League
Boston 5, 3; New York 1, 5.
St. Loui~ 9, 5; Chicago 8, 3.
Brooklyn 6, Philadelphia 4.
Pittsburgh 7, Cincinnati 7.

ij

SPECIAL-ALARM CLOCK $1-SPECIAL

I

I

I.

Oct. 30-=Ina Bourskaya,

Russian
Soprano

Prina donnae with the Metropolitan and- Chicago Opera Companies.
with the Detroit Symiphiony Orchestra, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Conductor.

Soloist

Nov. 20==Raoul Vidas, Fhst

A brilliant and fiery virtuoso who has won great admiration. Soloist with the
Detroit Symphony Orchestra in a strictly popular program, Victor Kolar, Conducting.

Astonishing-

Dec. 4 Alfred Cortot,

French
pianiist

Ths artist has made a profound Inpression and is called "A Second Pader-
ewski." lls recitals are master-pieces of pianistic art.

Jan. 15==Kathryn Meisle,

American
Contralto

how beautifully our
HICKEY-TREEIAN
clothes adapt them-
selves to so many
shapes and sizes of men

The great success of this fine artist at the last May Festival is responsible
for her second Ann Arbor engagemient. She is a magnificent singer and possesses
unusual talent. Soloist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra it a strictly popular
program, Victor Kolar, Conducting.
Feb. 19,Maurice DumesnilPian
This brilliant artist has made a most enviable record throughout Europe and
In South America wAlre lie gave 158 concerts last season. Soloist wivith the Detroit
Symphony Orchestra, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Conductor.
COURSE TICKETS may be ordered by mail (selected in order of receipt) at
$2,00, $3.00, $4.00, $5.00.
Concerts begin at 8 o'clock sharp Eastern Standard Time. Special interurban cars leave
hall after all concerts.

f
i/
I=

Forty-five to fifty-five dollars

WL GER&COMPNY
Jor fl/en G 1&nce 1&X4&

CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Eli I

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