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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIC

G

DAILY

uttily

1I

k]

among the student body.
personnel of this activityI
smaller than that of any
tivity on the campus.

But the
is perhaps
other ac-

OFFICIAL NE WSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en.
titled to the use for republication of all
news dispatches credited to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
'Michigan, as second, class matter.
Stdbscriptin by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 24r4 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, q6o.,
. Communications not to exceed Soo words
if signcd, the signature not necessarily to
appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and ioticcs of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of theb Editor, if
left at or mailed to The Daily .office. Un-
sined commnuicstions will receive no con-
sideratin., No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
loes not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications. I
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-M .
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
City Editor...............James B. Young
Assistant City Editor ..........Marion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman.....E. R. Meiss
Nighit Editors-
Ralph Byers Harry Hoey
J. 1. Davison, Jr J. E. Mack
L,. J.Ilershdorfer R. C. Moriarty
I. A. Donahue
Sports Editor..............F. H. McPike
Sunday Magazine Editor.......Delbert Clark
Women's Editor ........ Marion Koch
Humor Editor ..........Donald Coney
Conference Editor. ...,........:H. B. Grundy
Pictorial Editor...............Robert Tarr
Music Editor..................E. H. Ailes
Assistants

M. H. Pryor
Maurice bet man
P A. tillington
W. D. Butler
13. C. Clark
A. B. Connable
Evelyn J. Coughlin
Eugene Carmichael
Bernadette Cote
T. E. Fiske
Maxwell 'ad
John Garli~nzhonse

Isabel Fisher
Winona A. Hibbard
Samuel Moore
T. C. McShane
W. F. Rafferty
W. H. Stoneman
Virginia Tryon
P. M. Wagner
A. P. Webbink
Franklin Dickman
Joseph Epstein
J. W. Ruwitch

- --- -- ..-....ems..,

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER..
JAdvertisin..... ..John . ramuel, Jr.
Advertising..........dward V. Conlin
Advertising ..............Walter K. Scherer
Accounts...............Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation...............David J. M. Park
Publication ...........I,. Beaumont Parks
Assistants

Debating at the University is iden-
tified with the Central team and the
Midwest Debating league, both of
which were organized to foster con-
tests between Conference schools.
Trying out for other faction resolves
itself into a process of elimination,
contests being held between the va-
rious applicants until the personnel of
each team is narrowed down to
eigh men. When the Anal selections
are made each squad has two debates
with rival Conference schools. Ability
to make one of the two teams is con-
sidered an honor, but failure to suc-
ceed is invariably more than balanced
by the benefit of the training gained
during the competition. Debating is
carried on under the authority of the
faculty of the Oratorical department,
and is open to both men and women.
freshmen only being excluded from
participation.
Three literary 1soceties, Athena,
Adelphi, and Alpha Nu, the first for
women, were organized to foster work
in oratory and debating on the cam-
pus. Membership in them is by elec-
tion, but anyone interested is per-
mitted to attend the meetings. What
is regarded as the greatest measure
of recognition for a debater is to be
initiated into Delta Sigma Rho, a na-
tonal honorary society.
No fault can be found with the
teams which have represented Michi-
gan in debating, as they have been
victorious in the lion's share of their
engagements. But the scarcity of men
for this enterprise coupled with the
inadequate support of the student
body, which has sometimes been no-
ticeable, are problems to be solved by
those who are attempting to elevate
the status of this activity at Michigan.
JUST COLLEGE BOYS
For the student who comes to col-
lege in sc.arch of an education the
wealth of worth while lectures, the-
atrical affairs, musical programs, and
cultural offerings of various sorts is
sometimes almost terrifying. Cone
week last year produced such names
as Junius B. Wood, Harry A.
Franck, . F. Pearce, Roy D. Cha-
pin, Hans Kindler, Leo Ditrichstein,
and Walter Hampden, and the coming
season promises to be just as crowded
with valuable attractions.
The student who would be educat-
ed would need to be a gentleman of
leisure to have time for all these at-
tractions, and a pnan of wealth as well
to afford them. To get all he can
he is forced to begin to make choic-
es, to discriminate against one thing
in preference for another. He finds he
must evaluate and select. He gets
the best sort of practical education,
for he is compelled to do the very
thing a real education is supposed to
help him to do.
For the rest of us, who think we
are doing our duty merely by placing
ourselves in a position where educa-
tion can "take", these better things
have little appeal. We patronize in-
stead the moving pictures, condemn-
ing them usually, but failing to rec-
ognize anything else as be.tter. What
a paradox - we come to the Univer-
sity to increase our critical faculty,
to learn to know the good from the1
bad, and, once here, we refuse to try
to exercise whatever sense we
have. We crave entertainment, but
neglect to try to understand what is
good entertainment and what is bad.
To confess that we are mere youths
and ought not to concern ourselves
so seriously with affairs of the day,
and being educated in general, Is the
most laughable of arguments. Of
course we are wild, irrepressible, ir-
responsible boys! Being at college we
must be so-to avoid offending the
public. But, after all, we really ought

to sneak a moment now and then to
find out about things - we are not
far from being men.

Will sub ginde
aindt god a gold

Dear Cal:
What, may I ask, are we to do
with the frosh engineer who
thinks a slide, rule is a baseball
regulation?

pI

ZEKE.
friend hoo
answer thiz?

EDITORIAL COMMENTT XT1
RESURRECTING TRADITIONS
(The Daily Texan)
Many of the traditions that formerly
meant so much to university life have
been forgotten, or relegated into dis-
use. A few years ago commencement
and class day exercises at the end
of the session were the greatest
events in a student's life; however,
these ceremonies are now considered
tiresome and uninteresting formalities
which must be endured with pa-_ __ _
tience. The old water tank, around
which centered so many historical DETROIT UNITED LINES
events in the university's career, has
long since been destroyed in the name. Ann Arbor and Jackson
of improvement. The poor old Blun- TIME TABLE
derbuss, dedicated to the purpose ofETME TAdr T
throwing verbal bricks at the faculty (Eastern Standard Time)
and students on April Fool day, has Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oo
a n' ;'7:0o am., 8 :oo a.m., 9:05 a.m. and
been consigned to a premature and hourly to 9:o; p.m.
undeserved grave by the student Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Ar'bor)- 9:47 a.ml, and every two hours
Assembly. Only "The Eyes of Tex- to 9:47 p.m.
as" and the pushball contest have Local Cars East Bound-7 :00 a.m. and ev-
ery #w<() hours to 9 :00 p.m., i i :oo p.m. To
been able to retain any of their tra- Ypsilanti only-- i1:40 pm., 1:15 a.m.
ditional importance. - To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m., 12:io
p. in.,

RAA

Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

OOKS and SVPPL

Some Things I've Never Seen
I've never seen a freshman pot
A sophomore with a, brick;
I've never seen potatoes hot
Go swimming in the creek;
I've never seen a co-ed paint
A sign on Tappan hall;
I've never seen a woman faint
Without she had to fall;
I've never seen a man with eyes
Set in below his mouth;
I've never seen a train go north
With the engine going south:
There's lots of things I've never seen
That I may see; but when
I do I'll bet two bits, by gosh;,
I'll lay off moonshine then.
SHE-GUN-DAH.

RE4L PEN SERVICE

RIDERS PEN SHOP

CO MI N
tManslaughter"9
?7VWHAT SIT?

PEN SPECIALISTS

808 S. State St.

WALK- OVER

Even the wearing of the freshman£
cap, one of the best customs a uni-
versity can have, is no longer ob-
served. University freshmen of for-

To Jackson and Kalamazoo - Limited cars
8:47, 10:47 a.im., 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at 8:47
P. tn.

WE SUPPOSE that the new fence mer years considered it a privilege
at the head of the Diagonal is to pre- and honor to be able to wear the tra-
vent inebriated motor-cars from ditional freshman cap. By wearing I
broadcasting about the campus. the green headgear, the first year

1922
S
1
Ii
15
22
29

CANADA HARRY says that his lat-
est song is called, "What Ho." By
the farmer.

And . .
And we'd
like to run a department
called
how a frosh feels
ONLY we suspicion
some ailing alec
would say
WITH HIS FINGERS!

TownsendH. kWolfe
Kenneth Seick
George Rockwood
Perry M. Hayden
Eugene L. Dunne
Wi. 7, (raplich, Jr..
ola Cey E. Peed
C. IL. Putnam
F.1). Ar-mantrout
H. W. Cooper

Alfred M. White
Win. D. Roesser
Allan S. Morton
James A. Dryer
Wm. H, Good-
Clyde I,. Hagerman
A. '-Hartwell, Jfr.
J. Blumenthal
HowardHdayden
W. K. Kidder
R'enry Freud

The Adventure of the Landlady's
Daughter
I 'had heard that She was H-ere.
Sometimes a faint, elusive aroma flit-
ted mysteriously about the atmos-
phere.
But I thought it might be merely my
rom-mate's old shoes, and dis-
missed it-as far as possible-
from my mind.
. . Then again I semed to catch
a flash of Idalian draperies, and
I would dream of Venus Aphro-
dite new-risen from the foam,
and of Hamadryads fle e t i n g
through summer woodlands, and
of Rosalind and Mary Miles Min-
ter and Daphne.
Always she was a Spirit Just Be-
yond, a Shining Vision, a Reve-
erie.
And now I have seen her.
And my faith in the Powers that
govern Human Destiny is shaken
forever.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1922

Night Editor-JULIAN ELLIS MACK.
EXCHANGE PROFESSORHIPS
It is one of the sad consequences
of war that it divides groups of peo-
ple employed in the same pursuits,
beween whom professionally there
should be little or no reason for ani-
mosity.
This has happened very conspicu-
ously in the field of education. After
1914 the educational interests in the
different countries of the world took
up sides against the enemies of their
country and for four long years lies
and propaganda were poured into the
ears of learning adolescents. Commu-
nications of a friendly sort stopped
instantaneously and the schoolma'm's
boasted love for truth and humanity
was turned toy enmity and hatred.
During this period the system of
exchange professorships was stop-
ped, and there was temporarily lost
to mankind a gr at educational force
for uniting the scholastica world and
displaying to .students the world over
the essential unity of human learn-
ing.
In its very nature education is not
national or sectionel. It is universal
if anything. True learning knows n.
national boundaries and any influence
which comes In to set up such boun-
daries is harmful and . should be
fought against and if possible de,
stroyed.
A very fruitful method of doing
this is that- practice of universities
in exchanging professors with for-
cign countries. Benefit results not
only to the professor himself but to
the students under his tutelege. It
helps to break down racial and na-
tional' prejudices and it graphically
illustrates to the'student the essen-
tial oneness of the aims and ends of
education.
At Michigan this practice is' being
revived;' ai dtwo or '"three exchange
profcssors have found their way into
our midst since 1918. The renewed
start which the University has made
is gratifying; and perhaps the future
will place education above the realm
of petty differences in international
politics, and in its proper position as
a guiding 'light in human relations
and world progress.

She's just as doggone pretty as
dreamed she'd be!
TOMAS A CELANO.

I

LIFE'S DARN FUNNY
"I'll never wed, you bet your life."
We hear 'em ev'ry hand.
But after dark, whe.n all is still,
The while the moon attempts to. fill
The night with wonders grand,
There's another whisper rife-
"Will you be my sweet, loving wife?"
ZEKE.
The Campus Credo
We, the Michigan mind, at high noonf
believe:
1.
That low marks are an indication of
gc.nius.
2.
That yeast cakes are good for the
complexion and the digestion.
3.
That the Annarbor police force is
not a bad chap if you get to know
him.

men became better acquainted with
each other, the result being a closer
class unity as well as wider ac-
qluaintance and friendship.
The Texan sincerely indorses the
tradition that upperclassmen should
.advise, guide and assist the first year
men to become familiar with the cus-
toms, intricacies and mysteries of col-
lege life. The average freshman
comes to the university with an ex-
alted opinion of his own importance ,
and ability. Consciously or not, he '
is still living on a high school pedes-
tal, a place he probably gained by
being valedictorian, star tackle on the
Hi eleven, or the most popular Ches-
terfield or Lochinvar in high school;
circles. Ins first year at college
should be a period of readjustment,
during which he is led to realize his
own ignorance and inexperience and
in return obtains an understanding of
true values.
The Texas does not believe in the
use of physical discipline in order to
bring the freshmen to observe the
customs of thecampus; nor does the
Texan indorse violations of the haz-
ing law in letter or spirit. There is a
better way than the employment of
physical means. The old belief that
the wearing of the freshman cap, or
the observation of other rules and
regulations for first year men, is
merely an onerous form of upper-
classmen bullying and a mark of in-
feriority should be replaced by a
feeling of class unity and a desire to
become a real part of university life,
as tradition and custom decree. The
freshmen themselves should see that
every member of their class obey the
rules. An offending freshman could
be sufficiently punished by being os-
t-acized by his own classmates and
made ineligible for campus activi-
ties.
It would be appropriate to have an
official committee on traditions, with
the special purpose -of fostering the
revival of old traditions and the in-
troduction of new customs of a de-
sirable nature. At annual tradition
meetings, freshman assemblies, or pep
rallies all customs of the university
should be made clear to the first year:
men so that they may know that the
rules and restrictions placed on them
are merely a part of their college
life and should be willingly observed.
There is need for a general revival
of university traditions and customs.
Without the transforming cloak of
tradition, the university is simply a
collection of buildings, a place to
go to class. Wth a heritage of tra-
dition, the university becomes a liv-
ing, enchanting being that retains the
love and loyalty of its men and women
throughout the long years after their
graduation. The time-honored tra-
ditions and customs should be re-
instated as a vital part of the univer-
sity. A revival .of university tradi-
tions will mark a wonderful renais-
sance of Texas spir.
TIIE GLAD HAND
(The. Kansas State College)
Dear boys and Girls: My, how fine
and wonderful it is that you children
have selecte 9ur 'school out of all the
other big schools all over this great
big United States 'as a place to come
and spend your papas' money. You
must know, dear children, how we all
appreciate it, and how glad we are
for you and the business office. Wel-
come, dear students: both old and
new.

Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When
you want a hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned inside out
.
with .all new trimmings are like new.
We also make and sell POPULAR
PRICE and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar' or more on a hat. We give
values and quote prices which cannot
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere
else. Try us for your next hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R. Stops at State Street)
For your room
LAUNDRY BAGS
MGcRM.COMP1Y
jor TI/en c c9,&ne 14w
Let's o
fiW aNams E0, AN G,
Today
The Huron River is
prettier than at any
other time of year.
THIS MAY BE
YOUR LAST
OPPORTUNITY

for all Colleges
at V oth ,Stores

'

2
9
16
30

I
2
s

115 South Main Street

'I

U e

t

OCTOBER
Tr W
f3 4 A
0 11 12
7 18 1
14 25 2

Langham

Overcoats

Tailored in Chicago

T
5
12
9
6

F
6
13
20
27

1922
S
7
14
21
2S

I

Fall fasi
a sport o
broad-bo
wear wit
hose.
Price $10 ,.
-

I

I1

1'.;'P

a
Langham Clothes
Made by Leopold, Chicago

ion in
Xford--
ttomed
at toe-
.h wool

Van Boven & Cress

CCANOE LIVERY
2209-M

I

1107 South University Avenue

U

CASUALTIES OF PEACE
-During the great war 49,000 Ameri-
can soldiers were either killed in ac-
tion or died of wounds inflicted on
the battlefield. This enormous num-
ber of dead staggered the nation, and
the whole country wept for our cas-
ualties of war.
But a few weeks ago an annoufice-
ment was made which if taken seri-
ously would be e-qually staggering,
yet the nation seems to have paid
little attention to it. The National
Safety Council declared that in 1921
more than 76,000 men, 4vomen and
children in the United States were
killed by accidents on our streets. Al-
most twice as many Americans as died
in France.
A careless people we surely are.
Our casualties of war are not so great
as our casualities of peace. Seventy-
six thousand souls is too great a num-
ber to sacrifice on the altar of care-
lessness. It must be stopped.
As a supplement to the recent edi-
torial concerning possibilities for

OUR EMBALMED OUTLINE OF
WORLD'S HISTORY

THEI

I: The Origin of Man
Consider the lowly amoeba-most
distant of man's ancestors. (Go on,
consider him!) It has been only a
matter of some 10,000,687,001 decades
ago since man was a minute one-
cell organism pudling around in a
prehistoric puddle in search of his
mate. About ten thousand week-ends
had passed before lie found her. In
the meantime the evanescent amoeba
had been chasing all up and downthe
gamut of animal life from pollywog to
hairy ape. He was looking for a
place from which to spring to man-
hood.
He found it.
Man sprang from monl ey. Adam
took the first, leap-Eve came sec-
ond. But woman has long since out-
stripped man in the human race.
After this pentateuchal broad-
jump higher civilization began. Seven
thousaind holidays ;from then man
invented the first toothbrush.

Announcing the Opening of
I The Palace ,of Sweets'
SOUTH UNIVERSITY near Church St.
-t
JUST THE PLACE FOR A FEW MINUTES REFRESHMENT
- -
ICE CREAM SODAS
_ a
-SUNDAES
CANDIES LIGHT LUNCHES
DROP IN--BECOME ACQUAINTED
~SOUTH. UNIVERSITY_

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