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October 01, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Wfomen

All juniors and seniors who are in-
terested in playing hockey this fall
will meet at 5 o'clock Monday after-
noon at Barbour gymnasium.
All senior and sophomore advisors
of entering upperclassmen will meet
at 4:30 o'clock. Tuesday afternoon at
Barbour gymnasium.
Notices to be placed in this column
will in the future appear on two-suc-
cessive days only.
Manuscripts for the Junior Girls',
play are due Wednesday, October 25.
Those who plan to submit plays are
requested to do so on, or before that
date if possible. Helen Delbridge will
take charge of all contributions.
All upperclass women who wish to
elect hockey, tennis, or archery are
requested to meet at 5 o'clock Monday,
Oct. 2, in Barbour. Gymnasium.
Michigan Dames will hold their first
meeting at 8' o'clock Tuesday evening,
Oct. 3, in Newberry hall. Students
wives are eligible for membership.
For further information call Mrs.
Robert Stellwagon, 461-J.
All girls interested in belonging to
the Girls' Mandolin club will have an
opportunity to try out from 4 to 5:30'
o'clock, on Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday, at Newberry hall. Any
girl who can play a stringed instru-
ment is eligible for membership.

other years. In this case it is the
women who are in the majority, there
being 17 of them on trial as against 10
men.
Cubs' club, which is the meeting of
the tryouts, comes once a week. It is
expected that some will be appointed
to the staff in three weeks. Others
will probably tryout until Thanksgiv-
ing; while many others will remain
tryouts all of the semester. Elimina-
tions will be made all along.
First semester freshmen are not eli-
gible. The majority of the tryouts are
from the sophomore class.

Nere Males Weep as dobbed Haired
femmes Steal Tonsorial Privileges

Theaters

HEWL AT LACE GNETA
Although the college Y.W.C.A. didr
not send representatives to the Central
Student Conference at Lake Geneva,
Wisconsin, this year, the subject is
nevertheless one of interest to all
women students. The conference is
held under the auspices of the national
board f the Y. W. C. A. each year,
and in brief, its object is to .bring
women students together, that they
may "win a deepening understanding
of and experience in that friendship
with the Great Leader which will en-
able them to bear responsibilities of
leadership commensurate to their op-
portunities."
Not only is the religious life studied
at Geneva, but social and physical as-
pects of one's everyday living as well.
Sports, games, songs, conversation
and comradeship contribute toward
making the days rich in helpful and
beneficial material. Leaders, dele-
gates, and men trained for the great
tasks of life speak to the great con-
gregations; and when they have fin-
ished, the audiences leave feeling
"that the life of idealism and the dis-
cipleship of Jesus are woith more'
than anything else in the world."
Next year, probably in August, the
Lake Geneva Conference will be held
again. Students who avail themselves
of the opportunity of atten'ding may,
be assured that their time will be well
spent, and that the confernce will be
one of their greatest experiences in
life.
BENEFIT SALE TO
BE STAGED SOON
As a means of adding to the Uni-
versity of Michigan League fund a'
second hand sale will be given from
Oct. 7 to 14 inclusive at the St. Clair
second hand shop at 307 North Fourth
street. Furniture, pictures, clothes'
and bric-a-brac which has been do-
nated by students, members of the
faculty, and townspeople will be of-
fered for sale. The material has been
collected and rejuvenated by Mrs.
Hugh Cabot.,
On week days the benefit sale will.
be held from three o'clock in the af-
ternoon until nine o'clock and on Sat-
urdays it will be open from noon un-
til 9 o'clock.

What, what, ancient things! This
new freedom for the more delectable
sex will yet bring about the down-
fall of us mere males!
It's our barber shop standing which
is in danger now. Once impregnable
fortress of masculinity, the tonsorial
emporium is now on the verge of fall-
ing a willing victim to feminine lure,
even as .you and I. .,
"What ho, what's this?" ejaculated
the city editor as he glanced over
the latest issue of the Chicago Tri-
bune. "Women have invaded the
barber shops in Chicago! The Ladies
Home Journal is replacing the Police
Gazette, and chewing gum is to be
the order instead of nicotine palla-
tives! Go you out and make certain
this is not true in Ann Arbor."
And we sauntered gaily forth to in-.
terview the soft, self-valeted manipu-
lators of the facial grass cutters'.
Sneaking into the peaceful interior of
a deserted shop we padded up to the
proprietor and whispered:
"Say it is not true that the women
are disputing the male's sacred and
inviolable barber shop rights."
"Whatcha drivin' at?" quoth he, and
seeing we had to deal with one of
those rugged, rough fellows, we re-
sorted to the very simplest of diction
and asked:
"The ladies, you know, are theyl
coming to you for hair cuts, mani-
cures, and whatnot?" The light of
understanding flashed in his face.
"So that's it, eh? You bet they are.
SICK FOR HAWAII,
ENTERS MICHIGAN
To homesick freshmen the experi-
ence of Melz, a little Hawaiian whose
last name is unpronounceable, should
Back home in Hawaii, Melz works as
act as something of a soothing balm.
the. cast lands of Konewa Tif. But
he was ambitious, and had heard such
glorious stories of Michigan that he
decided to try his luck in Ann Arbor.
He arrived in company with his
employer's son, Paik, and the two
boys registered last Monday. Then
Melz sought work in order to earn his
way through school. He could find
none, and day by day his tiny supply
of money grew smaller. Friday,
broken in spirit and almost in heart,
he told Faik he was going to work his
way bcak home. "But, no," Faik an-
swered, "you will live with me now,
Melz, and at (Christmas time my father
will pay your way back home."
So Melz will stay until January.
Perhaps he will find work, perhaps
not-but he has his good friend Faik,
with whom he can play, at night, his
beloved, haunting Hawaiian melodies.
He is homesick and lonesome-but he
will stick it out. 'In his experience,
many American students may find a
lesson.

They started coming two years ago
when the bobbed hair craze broke
loose. Last year they came in strong-
er force and indications are that this
year will be a banner one for our
lady trade. They say they prefer men
to care for their needs because a
man is more efficient and the charges
for manicuring, hair-bobbing, shoe
more reasonable in the barber shops
than in the beauty parlors."
Virtually every other barber shop
head interviewed told the same story.
The outstanding exception, was the
manager of the Michigan Union shop.
He steadfastly refused to discuss the
matter.
Take your grief without a wince,
men; it's another trench lost!

CHURCH REMOVES
BAN ON TOLSTOI
Moscow, Sept. 1.-(By Mail).-The
anathema of excommunication, pro-
nounced more than 20 years ago by
the Russian Orthodox church against
Count Leo Tolstoi, the most interna-
tionally famous of Russian authors,
has been cancelled by the recent all
Russian conclave held at Moscow to
reform and simplify the Orthodox
worship. Count Tolstoi was thus
posthumously restored to good stand-
ing in the church.
The anthema was -pronounced be-
cause Tolstai's works were consid-
ered as attacks upon the church.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.
A free trip will be given to the Mich-
igan-Minnesota game by the Arcade
Barber Shop.--Adv.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

, .. ,i .
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Are advertised by those who have used them. It is advertis-
ing that comes from personal knowledge of the fine qualities
of our goods. It is advertising that comes from satisfied cus-
tomers. We are getting just such advertising all the time.
We always live up to our promises.

Our Wall Paper
and Paints

SPECIALS FOR SATURDAY
AND MONDAY

I

1 gal. $2.00 Floor Oil for . .

$1.50

. . . .

-- £

0
02
0
5.
0,
0M

ANN ARBOR CUSTOM SHOE FACTORY
Did you ever have a shoe repaired that
you were proud to wear afterward?
If you didn't why don't you try our service? We
put the shoe on the last and completely re-build it,
replace all worn out parts and make it like new-
all for the same charge as for inferior work.
THIRTY MINUTE SERVICE
H. W. CLARK, 534 Forest Avenue
Open Evenings, 7:30 - 8:30
ANN ARBOR CUSTOM SHOE FACTORY

-I

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d
'4.

$100 bottle Furniture Polish for
85c canFloorWax . . . . .
1 gal. Fine Floor or Interior Var-

.59
.55

I

nish for . . *

2.25

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C.IH. MAJOR & CO.

203 East

Washington Street

Phone 237

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ARCADE
"Fools First," the opening attraction
of the week, is an unusual crook play
with a climax thrilling enough to
make even the, most blase person sit
up in excitement. A strong supporting
cast includes Claud Gillingwater,
Claire Windsor and Richard Dix.
"Trouble," featuring Jackie Coo-
gan, the popular child star, is one of
the best balanced comedy dramas that
has been put on the screen recently.
Jackie gives an excellent portrayal
of the little waif whose remarkable
experiences in an orphanage and later
with his adoptedfamily furnish plenty
of entertainment. The little star will
be seen here the latter half of the
week.
MAJESTIC
"The Valley of- Silent Men," James
Oliver Curwood's famous story, be-
gins a four-day run at the Majestic,
Sunday. In filming this northern ro-
mance, the cast, headed by Alma Ru-
bens and Lew Cody, spent 12 weeks
in the Canadian Rockies, living in log
cabins and camping with the Stoney
tribe of Indians. Buster Keaton, the
;.§olemnfaced comedian, will be shown
in'"Cops," as an added attraction.
A story which teems with color and
action and takes the spectatorback to
the'ldays of the Alaskan gld rush, is
fThe Siren Call," an Irvin Wilit pro-
duction, which will be the feature for
the remainder of the week. Dorothy
Dalton in the role of a dance hall.
girl, David' Powell, as leading man,
and Edward J. Brady are prominent
in the cast.
ORPHEUM
"Queen o' the Turf," which opens at
the Orpheum Sunday, is a romance
of the race course, full of human in-
terest from start to finish. The play,
with Brownie Vernon as leading lady,
recalls the old thrills of "Checkers"
and is brilliant with the color and
tingle of the race course on derby day.
Mystery, adventure, love, and strife
play the principal roles in the big dra-
matic tale of crime and punishment,
"The Right Way," a Thomas Mott Os-
borne story, which will be shown
Wednesday and Thursday.
Mildred Harris in "The First
Woman," will be the closing feature
of the week.
WUERTR
George Arliss is seen in an entirely
new role in his latest comedy-drama,
"The Ruling Passion," which 'comes to
the Wuerth the first four days of the
week. Mr. Arliss portrays a lovable
elderly philanthropist who takes a'
prescribed "rest" cure by plunging
into the hobby of work and solving the
love affair of his daughter.
"The Cradle Buster," which will be
shown the remainder of the week, may
be classed as one of this season's best
juvenile comedies. Glen Hunter gives
a splendid characterization in the role
of "Sweetie" Reid, a "mother's boy,"
whose declaration of independence on
his twenty-first birthday results in a
near tragedy.
TRYOUTS COMPETE
FOR DAILY STAFF
Look and Peck system of typewrit-
ing is raging at the Daily. It is the
time of trying out. They are on every
side-those who have not tired out.
Desks are full. telenhones are busy.

Special Showing
of
New Millinery

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that you should see

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Chic New Creations
That Will Complete in

an Appropiate Manner
Your New Wardrobe

T SHOPPE
Mrs. Grace Van Schoick
230 Nickels Arcade, Tel. 795-W

STARTING TODAY
L;;00 pW W; uU VHYM FATRE

STARTING TODAY

FIRST OF WHICH IS

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JAMES OLIVER CUR WOOD'S
GRIPPING DRAMA OF STRONG MEN WAGING THEIR BATTLE OF LIFE AND LOVE
IN THE FROZEN NORTH,- GOD'S COUNTRY, ACTUALLY FILMED AMID THE MA-
JESTIC CANADIAN ROCKIES.
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The hunter became the hunted, an officer of the Royal Mounted, flee-
ing, fighting for his life-
Guided to a secret valley in the frozen North by a hot-blooded
Frencl.Canadian beauty, with a; secret of her ofn-
That's the start of this greatest of all Curwood dramas. Portrayed
by a cast of stars. Directed by the man who 'made "Humoresque."
Sweet Jane with limousine tastes refuses to marry
Buster less he corners Liberty Loan market. Bus-
ter trades six-bit capital for bag of German marks
and goes in the junk business.

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SECOND SPLENDID FEATURE

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CBR~Os
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THE FROZEN-FACED COMEDIAN
"USTE
IN "COPS"

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formances at 1 :M* ad 3:00. - Same as
Evening Shows with Orchestra.

Evening Crowds by at-
Sunday Afternoon Per-

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