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November 30, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-11-30

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THE WEATHER
COLDER; PROBABLY
SNOW TODAY

LL

tit.

iIl

ATTEND THE
THANKSGIVING
SERVICE TODAY

VOL. XXXIII No. 58

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1922

PRICE FIVE

i

ATHLETIC HEADS.
TO HOLD BIG TEN
MEEA iTAT CHCG
MICHIGAN COACHES LEAVING TO-
DAY TO ATTEND GATH-
ERING
1923 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
TO BE ANNOUNCED SAT.
IESeball and Track Progra msmII1
Also Be IDcided On In Con-
ferences
Coach Fielding H. Yost, and asssit-
ant coach George Little will leave

Thanksgiving Day Proclamation

COUZENS. RECEIEES
APPOINTMENT TO
SEAT IN SNATE

Opera Issue Of
Chimes Out Dec.

61

"Enter into His gates with thanksgiving, and into
His courts with praise: be thankful unto Himr
and bless His name.'

We,
anct wit
three ce
and pra
We
and vin
have bef
prise ha
common
initiative
day bigN
rity of'
Which ha
the strug

tonight for Chicago to take part in-Ther
the annual conference -of the athletic of the SI
officials of the Big Ten schoo's. Prof. States in
Ralph W. Aigler, of the law school, of Than]
chairman of the Board in control of Give:
Athletics will folow Friday morning, day of N
They will be Michigan's first rep" dred and
resentatives to the conference and will
be followed Friday night bycoaches
Edward J. Mather, Ray L. Fisher, . By the ,
and Stephen J. Farrell, other heads Char
of Michigan's athletic teams.
First Meting Friday
The first meeting of the conference
officials will be a gathering of the
athletic directors at 2 o'clock Friday
afternoon in the Auditorium hotel,
Friday night these officials will meet
with the faculty representatives in a
combined meeting. Changes; of con-
ference rulings for athletics encount-
ers and conduct of the schools in the ATSEl
Big Ten will be brought up at thie
time. Kalamazoo Co
Schedules of contests in football, Addrei!
baseball, and track will be made out
by the coaches of those sports at meet- ,
ings to be held on Saturday. These "REVIVING N
schedules will be for the season of NAMED A
1923 except for basketball which is
already made out. The basketball Prof. Allen
meeting will be for rules interpreta- KrofmAllen
tion." Kala mazoo col:
Tie football meeting which Coach cipal speaker
(Continued on Page Six). Thanksgiving s
morning in Hi
VETERANS PLAN ANN'IAL soir oben wil
tional Ideals'".
In addition
SHIN MllTIRY OBL will be a solo
the School of
Plans for the military ball given Moore, of the,
bO Al th1 nr an

have come again to the season of the year when, in accord-
th the devout custom established by our fathers more than
nturies ago, we formally set apart a day of thanksgiving
ise .to Almighty God for all His mercies and blessings.
have every reason for thankfulness. Our fields and orchads
eyards have yielded richly of their products. Our people
en sober, industrious and steadfast. Industry and enter-
ve translated the varied and unlimited resources of our
wealth into wealth and happiness for all who have had the
and the capacity to do and achieve. While we face a new
with many perplexing problems, may our faith in the integ-
American institutions be rededicated to the government
as always symbolized the best that has been achieved since
ggle for representative governrent began.
efore, by virtue of the au';hority vested in em as Governor
tate of Michigan, I hereby join the Presient of the United
a designating THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1922, as a day
ksgiving and prayer.
m under my hand and the Great Seal of the State this tenth
ovember, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hun-
d twenty-two, and of the Commonwealth the eighty-sixth.
ALEX J. GROESBECK,
Governor..
Governor:
les J. De Laud,
Secretary of State.

1lege President Will,
sR T1hsnksgl ing :
Ileeting
ATIONAL IDEALS"
S SUBJECT OF TALK
Hoben, president of
:ege, will be the prin-'
at the University
service at 11 o'clock this
ill auditorium. Profes-
1 talk on "Reviving Na-
to this address there
by William Wheeler, of
Music. Prof. Earl V.

UBSID B L U is
'PASSED BY HOUSE'

D E T R O I T MAYOR EXPRESSES
FEELING OF -RESPONSIBILITY
IN ACCEPTANCE '
DETROIT SHOWS REGRET
A T CHIEF'S DEPARTURE
Appointee Praised by Political Organ.
ganizatlons Throughout
State
BULLEiTIN
New York, Nov. 29. -- Mayor
James Vouzens of Detroit, ap.
pointed by Governor Groesbeck
to succed Newberry, said today
that his past activities in office
could be taken as a guide to what
he would do in the future. -
Mayor Couzens came to New
York today with Mrs. Couzens and
his son Francis to spend Thanks.
;gving with the mayor's daugh-
ter.
"In accepting," he said, "I do so
with a keen sense of responsi-
bility of the office. Especially do
I feel so at this time in the woxld's
history. In leaving the mayor's
office of Detroit I do so with deep
affection for the city which has
done so march for me and Which
has honored and trusted ' me.
There are no more patriotic peo-
* pie on earth than those of De-
troit..
(By Associated Press)
Lansing, Nov. 29.-Belief that May-I
or James Cotuzens of Detroit will take I
the seat in the United States senate
vacated by Truman H. Newberry at
the- opening of the regular session of
congress next Monday was expressed;
by political. observers here today fol-
lowing Mr. Couzens'. appointment to
the place by Gov. Alex J. Groesbeck.
Expected to Accept
Although Mr. Couzens, who is in
New York to'-spend Thanksgiving day
with his daughter, a college student,
has made no public announcement of
his acceptance, the governor's state-
ment declaring his choice said the
Mayor had agreed to take the posi-
tion.
In announcing the appointment
which becomes effective immediate-
ly, Governor Groesbeck declared his
belief that Mr. Couzens will be "a
strong inrluence for good in the sen-
ate," adding, "there are no strings at-
tached to him."
Detroit's mayor, who started life as
a railroad worker, ishcredited for at-
taming for that city the iest munic-
ipal owned street railway in the
world.

Heralded as an Opera number, the
'December issue of Chimes campus
opinion magazine,hwillmake its ap-
pearance Wednesday, Dec. 6. Articles
on the seventeenth annual opera "In
and Out", along with several pictures,
will be the chief feature of this is-
sue.
The annual Soph-Frosh conflict has
received due consideration in a story
which tells of the keen interest mani-
fested by the class of '25 in awaken-
ing in. their younger colleagues the
gamboling spirit by all manner of ab-
surdities. Short stories and other ar-
ticles of campus interest will also ap-
pear in this issue.
THEATER RSHN

NOTICE

iJ-HOP DATE SET FOR- FEBU 9;
BUDGET FOR BALL APPROYED;
TICKET PREPLCDAT

IBecause of- the Thanksgiving,
C vacation The Daily will issue no
paper Friday morning.
The issuing of a paper on that
morning would entail work by
the regular staff during the hol-
iday, and as Thanksgiving has
always been recognized by the
University in a dismissal of
classes, the management of The
Daily feels that it is fitting that
k the holiday should be complete
for those who customarily spend
a large part of the afternoon and
evening preceeding the date of
I issue in working on the paper.
.

The annual Junior Hop

Expr;'sses Belief That Situation
Exaggerated; No Breakdown
Near

Is

COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO
EXAMINE SUNDAY DAMAGE
Student council members discussed
the "rushing" of. the theaters Sun-
day evening in which students are
said to have caused damage to the
theaters, in their meeting last night,
denying emphatically In their dis-
cussion that the situation showed any"

Near East Parley Adopts
To Demilitarize Asia
Islands

ADMITTANCE TO BE GIVEN TO
CLASSES ON PERCENTAGE
BASIS
APPLICATIONS WILL BE
DISTRIBUTED TUESDAY
Committee Plans Return of Requests
by December 13; Actual Sale
Starts January 4

to be gi

Reiolutiol
3tinor

Measi'e Carried By Slight
Final Count 208 to
184

Margin;

FACES. THREATS IN SENATE .
FIGHT BEGINNING MONDAY
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 29.-=The admin-
istration shipping bill, around which
was waged the most bitter partisan=
fight of" the present congress, was
passed today by the House with 24
votes to'spare. The final count wan
208 to 184.
Sixty nine Aebubldcans broke away
from their party organization and op-

breakdown in student government.
Believing from the investigation RUSSIANS REFUSED FULL
thus far carried on by the council PARTICIPATION IN MEE'IJ
members that the reports of the dam-
age done to the Whitney, Arcade, and (By Associated Press)
Majestic theaters are exaggerated, the Lausanne, Nov. 29.-Turkey's a bi
councilmen, following their discus,-
sion chose a committee to determine tion to have a demilitarization zone'
the exact amount of damage done to marked along her frontiers was parts
each theater, . to issue a statement of ly realized today as far as it concerns.
the true situation on the "rushing", the string of Greek islands jutting
and to provide means of prevention along the coast of Asia Minor in the
of any further destruction of proper-
t;. iAegean sea.
Committee to Investigate The territorial commission in the
The committee chosen consists of Near East conference adopted the re-
the following men: Jack Kelley, '24L, port of a sub-committee which recom-
chairman, Lawrence W. Snell, Jr., '23, mended that important measures of
Robert E. Adams, Jr., '23, Howard J.
Liverance, '23, Herald C. Hunt, '23 demilitarization be carried out on
Ed., Thomas J. Lynch, '25L, and John these islands.
R. Polbamus, '24E. Ismet Pasha Unsatisfied

by the junior classes of the Unive
sity will be held Friday, Feb. 9. T
tickets for the Hop will sell for I
and will be distributed among t:
following junior classes in proportic
to the number of students in eat
college on a pro rata plan: litera
college, engineering school, la
school, mnedical school, College
Pharmacy, dentalscollege, archite
tural college, and School of Educatic
The budget, as drawn up for the He
this year, was approved by the 'Ui
versity Committee on Student Affai
yesterday afternoon.
In plannig for the Hop, the corhi
tee has had to follow many of tV
preliminary steps taken by the con
mittee last year. The rules for hou
parties and for the government
the Hon itself were adopted as draw
up by the Hop committee last yet
in conjunction with the Student cou
cil.
Applications Distributed Next We(
Applications for tickets to the' H
will be given out from 1 to 5 o'clo(
Tuesday and Wednesday affernooi
at the Union. At the saie ime <
each afternoon the class treasurers
the literary and engineering colleg
will collect class dues in the Unic
in view of the ruling of the Hop tic
et committee providing that no appl
cations for tickets will be considers
unless tlhe applicants have paid i
their class dues.
Considerations in qualifying for tl
tickets are Number of hours and fu
payment of class dues. All :uniors ab
preference over all other clasemen a
cording to the ruling passed by ti
Hop committee. Yet it is believi
that there may. be more than enoug
in which case the seniors will rece
next preference. This was the cap
last year. In case more application
are received from juniors than can 1
filled they will be considered in tl
order in which they arrive in tl
llands of the ticket committee, whit
is composed of the following men: ]
Roy Neisch, '24, Hugh A. McGregc
'24, and Harry C. Clark, '24.
Method of Distribution Exnl}hat

School of Music, will
Sc Thool ossemblus. wi +hposed the bill, while four democrats
RJ~~4'. 'ThV b is assmbl wh. h

every spring by the ex-soldiers on ta
campus were discussed at a meeting
of the Veterans of Foreign Wars held
last night at the Union. Committees
to have charge of the affair this year
were appointed as follows: executive,
L. D. Hall, '23, C. H. Smith, '24L, and
Maj. Robert Arthur, commandant of
the R. O. T. C. Decorations, John
Halstead, Carl Hausman, H. C. Cearl.
Programs, Captain Hoorn, R. K. Su-
per, '25E. Music and recreation, K. R.
Slater, '23E, L. B. Stokesburg, '24E.
Banquet, P. H. Goldsmith, R. F.
Hague, '25M. Tickets, W. 1. Williams,
H. Kaeseman.

Ae at Oe gril n.t aMUuy, WI
is sponsored by the Sunday service
group, will be open to all University
students,
Professor Hoban has had an emi-
nent career as a sociologist, serving
as professor of this subject for many
years at the t !ersity of Chicago
and later at Carleton college. He is
an ordained minister, having been
pastor of the First Baptist church of'
Detroit for three years, from 1905 to
1908. From 1901 to 1904 he was di-
rector of the Baptist Students guild
here at the University.
He is the author of several books
upon subjects related to the ministry,
and was at one time secretary of the
Chicago Juvenile Protective associa-
tion. During the war Professor Ho-.
ban was a director of the Y. M. C. A.,
5th Division, A. E. F.

supported it. There never -was much
doubt about therbill but the margin
was mnuch lower, than expected. It
was however just about what they
figured on privately.
In the face of threats to, delay, 1i
not prevent, its passage by the Sen-
ate, the measure will go Monday to
the Senate committee which plans to
accept it as passed by the House and
take the fight to the floor next week.

The budget for the council for the
next University year, 1923-24, which
will be raised from the 'classes of the
various colleges, and which will be
used for the activities of the coun-
cil, was approved.
It was also decided that funds con-
tributed by students to send the foot-
ball team to Minnesota which shall
not be called for by students shall be
used to defray the expenses of the#
celebration Sunday night on th;e
homecoming of the football men.

Ismet Pasha, the chief Turkish del,,
igate, was not quite satisfied with the
report. He claimed that all the mil-4
itary records on the islands should be
removed.
The, second outstanding decision of
the day was that the status of certain
other Greek islands should be studied
as part of the general prob'em of the,
straits and that the.Russia delegates
should be invited to participate in this

in managing the military ball.,
Library Closed Today
Due to the observance of Thanks-
giving day, the University library will
remain closed today. y
$100,000 DAMAGES ASKED FOR BY
Gotham Preacher FORMERHOMEOPATH
FOMERA HOEPATIT
Heads New York HOSPITAL PATIENT
Ku Klux Workers Dr. Scott C. Runnels, director of
homeopathetic laboratories of the
University, and the Board of Regents
have been named as defenders in a
$100,000 law suit started at the insti-
gation of Miss Fay Robinson, who
declares that a surgeon's sponge was
left in the wound sewed up after an
- operation performed on her by Dr.
Runnels. She is suing the defendants
for $50,000 each.
According to the declaration that
was filed by the plaintiff's attorney
< with the county clerk yesterday morn-'
j ing, Miss Robinson was operated on
by Dr. Runnels, May 23, 1921. Th'j
wound healed satisfactorily and all
x'}danger was apparently over, until
June 6 of the same year, when she
became dangerously ill and another
s operation was necessary to save her
life. When the wound was reopened
- a surgeon's sponge was disclosed in
her abdomen, the plaintiff declares in
- her suit. For this act she desires
$50,000 damages.
The other $50,000 damages are
cCaimed from the Board of Regents,
a corporate body, for the plaintiff
avers that they are responsible for
* the acts of the physicians, attendants,

Charman Green of the merchant ma- Ferris Lands Appintee discussion. Temtoofdsru
rine committee and Representative Senator-elect W. N. Ferrisof Dardaelles to be Discussedrday The method of distri
Edmonds, of Pa., ranking republi- apda Do crat in Feting Negotiations touching on the Dar- s for the Hop, aco
aids, a Dmatin commenting to- 3 spKT RES CU I ,lan as drawn upt by t h
can who shouldered the fight through day on the appointment, said, "The denelles problem may be started on mittee
the house, declared tonight that de- governor could not have chosen a bet- Friday. M, Tchitcherin, the Soviet roie that
spite amendments the measure would ter man unless he had picked foreign minister cannot reach Laus- sallnreceivefatnukeberio
te a nesh a ikda Dem- Eldredge, '14, to Be Guest of Saeety b ht ad Rkvk tal number of tickets in
pave the way for putting the Amerii ocrat."n s anne by that time and M. Rakovsky
can flag at the high place-on the seas. During the 24 hours preceding an- aTwill represent Russia as well as the that school.
The general view on both sides was nouncement of the appointment, Gov- Gordon C. Eldredge, '14, will speak Ukrain and Georgia. The budget for the
hat ha an attemt beed maden toernor Groesbeck is reported to have at the Press club dinner Tuesday eve- Lausanne Nov 29-The Russian was sanctioned when the
a received word from a number of repre- ning, at the Wisteria Shop. Mr. El- 'dcommittee net yesterda
dfae.-sentative ,Detroit citizens urging him dredge is manager of the Detroit o dlgto oihtrcie mn- with the University Cc
There' was a shout of approval on not to take Mr. Couzens from their dre of the t rnan Cu- ication from the Near East confer- Stet Ufir er eac
the Republican side when the an- city because they feared the mtunici- n h adertsng agen and has ence rejecting the Russian request to budet ha b ee ea
nouncement of- the final vote was pal poet net e h uii iga detsn gny n a be allowed participation in discussion bde a enepan
e sp projects undertaken by him would assisted in several important national be allo praton in bdyiti mittee. In the same
made.sufferadvertising surveys. The subject for of all questions before that body with- price of admission to the
his address has not been announced is to be $7, was also sanct
but will probably deal in part with leUniversity committee.
" butswil prably deal in France, Great Britain and Italy are (Contihued on Pag
+"1some phase of advertising. nanmoutinstadingby heagie
M ediocreCom positionsFeature Tickets for the Press club dinner cnane ivistaingt Rutssiansto
will be on sale Friday. Attendance .
Weekly Organ Recital Program is not limited to members of the club paerticite only in the discussion of Russ Duke Pi
but is open to all who are interestedTo 'u""~"'
in journalism 'as a whole or in the
Mediocre compositions and average rhythm and showy outbursts left the speaker of the evening and his work. vaGietyLmar
variety marked the regular organ pro-impression of an organatic fireworks. U ,
gram given yesterday afternoon in J.P.D MASONS DISCUSS{
Hill auditorium by Prof. Earl V._- IANIEAIMoStT IETIiIsIin
Moore. Perhaps the most interesting FINANCIAL MEAN II AIIN IIYM E IN y
piece presented was the short andLI1111 IL
quite unpr'etentious "Elegy" by Noble, b I I Masons of Ann Arbor held a large Joseph A. Bursley, Dean of Stu- ,
the more spectacular compositions be- Tmass meting in the Masonic Temple dents, with eight representatives from
ing empty and a bit tiresome. last evening to discuss the raising of the fraternities at Michigan, will at
The sonata in A minor of Borowski, $75,000 to pay off obligations held tend the Interfraternity Conference,
opening tbe program, was tao mass- against the Masons by Ann Arbor the annual gathering of delegates
ive to be reatly effective. in the An- I Upon recomnmendation of the Stu- banks. Dean Edward H. Kraus, of from alI the leading men's fraterni-
dante movement a pleasantly langor- dent Advisory committee the local the Summer Session, was the princi- ties at the American colleges and uni-
ous rhythm appeared, quiet and mel- chaptei- of Sigma Alpha Epsilon was pal speaker. Others speakers were versities, which will open tomorrow k
low. declared to be off probation on Jan. John Lindenschmitt, President of the at the Hotel Pennsylvania in New -
Noble's "Elegy", wih uncomplicat- 1, 1923, by the Senate committee on Masonic Temple association, Horatio York. More than 200 delegates will
ed theme and richly rising tones from Student affairs which met yesterday Abbott and Roscoe 0. Bonisteel, mrm- be present.
the lower pipes, was pleasing for its afternoon in University hall. th ers of the Temple association, and F. H. Nymeyer, a graduate of Illi-
utter simplicity. Lacking anything of Recognition was formally given the Dr. Hinsdale, nois, will preside at the conference,
intellectual content, it satisfied the Liberal club, a club newly-organized The speakers outlined all that has which will be devoted to such sub-
unexacting taste of the small audi- by a group of students on the cam- been done since it was decided to jects as the relation of the fraternity
ence present. And Mr. Moore played pus. The committee was also noti- build the Masonic temple ten years to the college, the movement for the^a
it with skill and delicate touch. fied that recognition had been granted ago, and how it has been financed up 'economy in education, how fraterni-
Bird's Turkish "Oriental Sketch", to the Argo club, a local house club. to the present time. It was shown ties can further assist colleges, the
with bizarre twists and a peculiar In addition, recognition was given to that $75,000 will be needed to com- chapter's relation to the parents of its
rhythm, called forth visions of jangl- a group of students who had formed a plete payment of the present contract, members, and the further develop-
ing dancers and airy minarets. Its local house club, Mesaba. . and how this money can be raised by ment of freshmen.
shrill piping and fantastic beat was Permission was granted to the Jun- a bond issue.
characteristic of the Turkey we of the for lits to handle the chairmanship The Ann Arbor lodge is huilding a I To Attend Physics Moet

rtion of t]
rding to t]
he -op coi
each scho
ut of the t
direct pr
f students
oming affa
e entire H
ay afternoc
ommittee
h item of t;
d to the cor
meeting t]
affair, w'hi
;ioned by t]
e Twol.

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