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September 30, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-09-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

B i

VENiZELOS GOLFS
AS GREEK THRONE
BJANGS IN BALANCE
FA

I WEEK' CLOSIS

NEW CHEERLEADER
NAMED BY COUNCIL
Appointment of a temporary cheer-,
leader by a committee chosen by the
Student council to investigate and lay

TAU BETS Pt- TO'
SHO LD MiET HER

sion; afternoon-excursion to the See the :Minnesota game at the Ar- Drawing instruments-bargains in
Highland Park plant of the Ford Motor cade Barber Shop's expense. Ask the second-hand sets. Wahr's Uni versity
company, followed by a dinner and barber.-Adv. Bookstore.-Adv.
theater party in the evening; Saturday
morning-business session at the
Union; afternoon-no meeting, to per--
mit the delegates to insepct the
campus; evening-annual convention
banquet at the Union. Shorthand
Many prominent members of the so-
ciety are expected, including the sec-'M A
retary-treasurer, Prof. R. C. Matthews T y pe w ritin g
of the University of Tennessee.

(Continued from Page One)
as before, although no authentic fig-
ures have been published. Maybe the
rooming trouble has its effect upon
enployment in the city. "Are landla-
dles" ilHin to-employ furnace men
and house men before they rtft the
larger share of their rooms?' The
question was asked time after time,
and every answer was different.
Landladies themselve could not an-
swer the question concertedly. Some
house men have been hired; but, in
other places, with more time on their
hands and a less positive income,
houseowners have i concluded to do
all their own work. And this has kept
niany University men out of work.
Dean' Bursley stated: "It simply
means that there are more fellows
who, have to work." The work in
Ann Arbor, of which there is only a
limited amount, ought to go to the
people who need it to pay for their
rooms, board, and books, rather than
to those who want the extra spending
money for movies and dances. These
latter probably do not realize that
'they are depriving ones wlo really
need the incomes but that is what
they :are 'doing.
"Our loan fund has been practically
.all used up. More applicationshave
been turned in already this year than
we had during the .past entire col-
lege year,"' he said. The loan fund is
a limited capital, a'vailable for stu-
dent loans, wherever the cause is de-
serving, upon satisfactory applica-
tion through Dean Bursdey's office.
Job Se retary Optimistic
.Mrs. Mary 4. Steward, emloyment
secretary of the tniversity, believes
that in due time everything Will ad-
just itself and most of the jobless will
find work. Now she is placing men at
odd jobs every day, and these will
continue throughout the year. She
believes that "the situation is clear-
ing and the boys are 'beginning to
take the odd jobs which they at first
refused and that Ann Arbor people
are helping wonderfully to co-oper-
ate.''
Classmrnn. 'a Problem
Yet wereMichfgai men to have all
the positions they wanted, and were
the landladies to be satisfied, there
Swould still .be one mpore great source
ofworry on the campus. Dean
'Iumphreys, in charge of the assign-
ing pf classrooms, remarked: "it is
gettiki 'so now that we often have to
tell departments applying for rooms
at certain hours that there is abso-
lutely not a single room available at
the p ifiet time " Although the in-
crease in r estration in theliterary
Idepte t , ben'negligible, bare-
ly yer a hynared, the demand for
clasdro9l fet far more than ever
, bef fa " 'A
D- Ileatn E, commenting upon the
classrooi*a wr age, asked whether
the tearin wn of one of the old
engineering buildngs could have any-
thing to do with it. Professor Mc-
Laughlin stated that possibly a small-
er registration in afternoon classes
would result I# a concentration upon
one or two of the more popular morn-
ing hours. Maybe this concentration,
growing greater every year, has just
passed its limitation.
Other suggestions include the ne-
'cessity of more courses by a larger
number of petitions for extra hours
than formerly, but no definite figures
are available here. Maybe the great
interest in English this year was
partially caused by the presence in
Ann Arbor all last year of Robert
Frost, the great American poet, and
by the presentation of the poet lec-
ture series last -winter Perhaps the
new requirements. in some of the spe-
ealized engineering department$ de-
manding more literary work have had
sotnething to do with it. There are
many possibilities; there are many
suggestions as to causes.
.Stutdents Still Come
Remedies are not so easy to dis-
cover. Many of the sections are be-
ing split, more afternoon classes are
being, formed. Certain classes are
being limited to upperclassmen, Other

expedients may have to be resorted to
before the matter can be cleared iOp.
And the late registrants are still- fil-
ing in?
LABOR P RTY PROTESTS
London, Sept. 29.-The national
council of the British labor party
issued a manifesto today protesting
against "th~e obstinate and persistent
mishandling of the near eastern pobn-
lcm by the British government." The
manifesto declared that, if necessary,
the council would summon a confer-
ence of all its affiliated organizations
to do all in their power to avert; a
national calamity induced by another
war.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

plans for the organization of a new
cheer leading squad was made yester.,
day. William H. Frankhauser, '22L,
was appointed to fill the vacancy left
by the graduation of Alfred 0. Cuth-
bert, '21E.
The Student council acted last
Wednesday when it was found that
although a complete organization for
a new system of cheer leading had
been worked out last spring by thet
Booster club, nothing had been done1
to put this plan into operation. t
The plan called for a squad of ninet
men, a Varsity cheerleader, three
assistants and five tryouts, to be
active the year around. At the endI
of each year the new leaders were to
be chosen from the assistants and
tryouts for the next season. This, it
was thought, would permit only ex-
perienced men to lead the stands dur-
ing the games. A common unifolnm
was also adopted.
The appointment of the new cheer-
leader must be ratified by the Student
council before he assumes his office.
The cheerleader will make his first
public appearance on Traditions night,
Oct. 4, when he will lead the coatless
audience of yearlings in Hill audi-
torium in their first rehearsal of
Michigan yells.{

National Engineering Society Will
Hold Annual Convention Here
On October 12
FORTY SCHOOLS TO SEND
REPRE SE NTATIVYE S 11 EkE
Delegates from more than 40 techni-
cal schools and colleges throughout

t

1the country will convene in Ann
Arbor on Oct. 12 for the annual na-
tional convention of Tau Beta Pi, na-
tional honorary engineering fratern-
ity. Daily business sessions will be
held at the Union, and entertainment
has been provided for the time other-
wise unoccupied.
For the first time all of the dele-
gates will be housed at the. Michigan
Union. The sessions which have been
held in Ann Arbor in years past have
been in the summer and the delegates
were accommodated at fraternity
houses.
The program of events arranged by
the local chapter follows: Thursday
morning-reception of delegates at the
Union; afternoon-short business ses-
,ion, followed by a tour of the city;
evening-smoker at the Michigan
Union; Friday morning-business ses-

The Michigan chapter's delegate to
the convention will be Lee O. Case,
grad., who represented Michigan when
the society was in session at Pitts-,
burgh last year. All active chaptpr
and alumni members will attend the
smoker and banquet.
A free trip will be given to the Mich-
igan-Minnesota game by the Arcade
Barber Shop.-Adv.

BEGINNING AND ADVANCED CLASSES
OCTOBER 2nd.
ENROLL THIS WEEK
Hamilton Business College
STATE AND WII.LIAM STREETS

Do you read the Daily ads?

You'll

u WrsrIaij
4 BE~e
* VW

,~"'

All' University Students woil be allowed to
play Golf on the Washtenaw Country Club
Links during the month of October by pay-
ing greens fee, $1.00 per day.

t
TASWRC.D AT PAStEtOfXM S

t. Vvnizelos, ex-prine muer
Greece.
M, Venizelos, ex-priie Minister of
Greec(e.
Nero fiddled while Rome burned
and Eleutherios Venizelos golfe
while the fate of Greece hangs in
the balance. Venizelos left Grece
rather hurriedly after King Con-
stantine's return. Now his sup-
porters are asking him to return.
SUN WAS IN ALLIANCE WITH
(Ji IN A, (4E RIIA N Y A Nt li R SSIA
Shanghai, Sept. 29.-Sun Yat Sen,
deposed president of South China, to-
day admitted the authenticity of let-
b nmhlished by the Hong Kong Tele-
6rapn, taken from his private safe
after his flight fromCanton, disclosing
his connection with a plot to form a
triple alliance composed of China,
Germany, and 'Russia.
-MOST OF POISONEtD ICH S HOOTL
STU)ET$S ACK AT l)ESKS AGAiN
Birmingham, Ala., Sept. 29.-Ninety
per cent of the 700 students of the
Woodlawn high school who were
poisoned Wednesday by eating ground
meat in ' combination with 'chopped
vegetable at the school cafeteria, were
at their desks today. The most seri-
ously ill among the students are re-
covering, it is said. Food experts are
making inquiries into the nature of
the poison element created by the
food combination.

I

e

Attention Detail
A close exaimnation of FASHION PARK clothes reveals
the fine hand tailoring of every minute detail. It is this care-
ful attention to the small things that makes the whole perfect.

$0 and more

J

OTHER GooD MAKES WITH EXTRA TROUSERS

$25.00 TO $30.00

WE ALSO MAKE SUITS" AND OVERCOATS TO ORDER

$30.00 TO $60.00

Lab. Coats, Waiters' Coats, Fresh Pots,
most reasonably priced, See us

Toques, Aprons, etc., etc.,
aid e convinced.

Jo- F. WUERTH CO.

FASHION PARK CLOTHIERS
NEXT To WERTH THEATER

VA

Y 5 -

Monday NightOct.2

WORLD'S
Lowest Priced
Fully Equipped
SOUP
24'-28in. doors-Roomy 44in.
seat for 1, 2 or38 people. Rear
carrying capacity, 74 cubic ft.
Will hold 36in. steamer trunk.
Equipped with Cord Tires.
PHONE 813 FOR DEMONSTRATION
BENZ OS.
Co nd Ashley

,m

I

BLI-A-NKETS
Steanwr Rugs and. Auto Robes
We have all' kinds in highest quality New ARMY BLANKETS, size 66 x 84 in Olive Drab, Oxford Grey
and Blue. Double' Blankets in wool for single or full size beds. Fancy Indian Blankets for couch or
spread and a large assortment of Wool Auto Robe s and Steamer Rugs priced from $3.00 to $25.00 All
exceptional values. Must be seen to be appreciated.

<----
ri i' -- \ /
, i
; ;
a
; --
,
0
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i
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"Tom Wye" Coats and Sweaters
LEATHER JACKETS, VESTS AND HUNTING COATS
Cravenettes, Rain Coats, Top Coats and
Overcoats at Lowest Prices
Breeches and Knicker Suits
LADIES' AND MEN'S.
Largest assortment in Corduroy, Gabardine, Moleskin, Tweed, Serge,
-. D. Wool, etc., Corduroy Suits.-----------

The Mode of Fall Millinery
I.Reveal ed Ain All Its

79
AAND I
xJOH ,-PHILIP SOUSA eobaudor
i% tt tena4 Commanderj.S.N.R..
First Music of the Season Played by the
First Musical Organization of the World
Music You Will Understand

SHOES

Munson Army, Officers' Dress and Hiking Shoes, Puttees,
High-Top andMoccasin Pack Shoes for ladies and men.

0. D. WOOL ARMY SHIRTS, PONGEE AND POPLIN SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR, ETC.

Splendor

Adr w 400b- qnqk U! iAr

I go A mok

Im

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