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November 08, 1922 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-11-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGMAli
Published every morning except Monday
uring the University year by the Board in
ontrol of Student Publications.

.

'of. Western Conference Editorial

The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all
news dispatches credited to it or not other-I
wise credited in this paper and the localj
news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,j
Michigan, as "second class matter.
Subscription by. carrier or mail, $3,50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ness. 6 o.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
if signed, the signature. not necessarily to
appear in 'print,. but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
left Lt or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Tlephones, 2414 and 176M
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
News Editor................Paul Watzel
City Editor James B. Young
Assistant City Editor .......,..Marion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman.......E. R. Meiss
Night Editors-
Ralph Byers Hatty Hloey
J. P. Dawson, Jr. J. E. Mack
L. A J, ershdbrfer R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donahue
Sports Editor......... F. H. McPike
Sunday Magazine Editor.....Delbert Clark
Women's Editor..............Marion Koch
Humor Editor..............Donald Coney
Conference Editor ....... ,....H. B., Grundy
Pictorial Editor..............Robert Tarr
Music Editor .................H. Ailes
Assistants
M. 1I. Pryor John Garlinahouse
Dorothy Bennetts Isabel Fisher
Maurice Bermah Winona A. Hibbard*
R. A. Billington Samuel Moore
W. B. Butler T. G. McShane
H. C. Clark W. B. Rafferty,
A. B. Connable W. H. Stoneman
Evelyn J: Coughlin. Virgini'a 'Tryon
Eugene Carmichael P. M. Wagner
Bernadette Cote A. P. Webbink
Wallace F. Elliott Franklin Dickman
T. E. Fiske Joseph Epstein
Maxwell Fead .. J. W. Ruwitch
J. A. Bacon
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 96Q
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising.......... ..John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertisng. ....Edward F. Conlin
Advertising.........Walter K. Scherer
Accounts . ......Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation........David J. M., Park
Publication ..........L. Beaumont Parks
Assistants .

and perpetuating the international
idea.
Scholarship has long been recog-
nized as international, but the atti-
tude of students in one country to-
wards foreign institutions is largely
provincial. While they may have some
knowledge as to the outward form of
education administered in other coun-
tries, the ideal that permeates the cur-
ricula is unknown to them. This sit-
uation is alleviated somewhat by ex-
change of professors, which the union
fosters and which makes possible in-
ternational mindedness. But this prac-
tice has not been carried on exten-
sively enough to have any great ef-
fect either here or abroad.
Free interchange of professors and
students between the universities of
the various nations will tend to dis-
pel provincialism and to give the stu-
dents of one nation a better under-
standing of the life and problems of
another. If the American union,
through co-operation with other or-
ganizations of its kind can make
some contribution towards bringing
this about, then its existence will be
justified, and Michigan may well be
proud of being a pioneer in the move-
ment.
NOW OR NEVER
During the next three days Michigan
students will have the opportunity to.
subscribe to the Michiganensian, the
official student year book of the Uni-
versity. Owing to the nature of this
annual publication, the exact number
of subscriptions must be known early
in the year. The actual printing and
binding of the work covers a consid-
erable period of time, and copies will
be printed only to cover the number
ordered.,
In the past those who have wanted
books have sometimes failed to take
seriously the request that they place
their orders during the fall sales cam-
paign, and consequently they have
found themselves unable to get a book
later on. Last year two hunlred peo-
ple, who formed a waiting list of late
subscribers, were unable to obtain
Michiganensians.
With this in mind, and realizing the
problems which confront those who
have in their charge the editing and
publishing of a volume which is of the
nearest interest to the student body,
those who desire Michiganensians fo
the coming year should not fail to put
in their order during the present cam-
paign.

OASTED ROLL
22 DAYS TO
THANiSGIVING

,. .,

THE SHILLELAGH URIEDI
(Harvard Crimson)

-A

rmmnnvrnnnnnrnnr rnrorrrr I

-I

MICHIGAN

SONG

BOOK

THE OLD ALUMNUS carefully hurl-,
ed a threefer cigar butt into the
Union's shiny brass cuspidor. "The
stoodent body is looking up," he re-
marked to the Amiable Ectoplasm.
"Give it another decade or so and wel
can take away its high-chair and let
it sit up at the table in a real chair
with perhaps only a pillow on the
Webster's dictionary.
"At last they have got on to the
idea of class officers. I see that this

The adoption of the constitution of
the Irish Free State marks the com-

s-: A T :.w:

I EDITORIAL COMMENT

llete ratification of the Irish treaty.

LAST EDITION OF

-o

year they hemmed
and hawed along for
about six weeks be-
fore a really authen-
tic election could be
pulled off. But they
fell at last, and now
look at the horrible
debacle. Class dues

running rampant with slavering jaws
all over the campus. If the stoodents
could have stalled the legislators off
for a few more weeks they might
have eaten Christmas dinner without
having soaked up for the honor and
support of a class organization.
"Well, it's live and get learned, and
it's a big surprise to me that they
have at last seen through the deep
disguise of class organizations. May-
be next year the experience of the
present will be taken to heart by the
campus and the class due wiil be a
thing of the past."
. * *
THIS IS THE END
A triangle eternal now isj
Center, Left and Right.
For Center's in between the two,
Gosh, what a sorry plight;
While others yearn
To take a turn'
We're sure each other's ears will
burn,
What think ye of our scandal now,
Oh, Campus, fair and bright?
CENTER.
The great problem of how to get Cen-
ter from between Left and Right, like
-the famed enigma of the crane in the
Clements Library, is now up for pub-'
lic discussion. For the best answer
to this terrific question toasted rolls
will present ball-bearing ashtray.
* * *

That no oposition will be met in the
British parliament has been virtually
promised by Mr. Bonar Law. In essen-
tials, the new' constitution follows the
British North American Act which
gave dominion independence to Cana-
da. If this form of government proves
as successful in Ireland. as it has
worked out in Canada the out-stand-
ing sore spot of the empire will be
healed.
Under existing conditions it is hard4
to see how any far-sighted Irishman
can ask more than the new constitu-'
tion gives. An oath of allegiance to the
king is required of every member of
the new parliament, but that is a form
more than anything else and ought;
not to stick for long in the Irish
throat. The crown, too, retains a vice-
roy in Iceland, but he is governed byI
the wishes of the wholly Irish execu-i
tive council. Except in the case of ac-
tual invasion the Irish Free State is
not committed to active participation
in any British war without the consent
of its own parliament. At the samej
time the British navy continues ,to
protect the Irish coast. So much lee-
way is allowed under the new consti-
tution, that even a tariff barrier may
be raised by Ireland against British!
goods.
Given everything short of actual in-
dependence, the great question now is
whether Ireland has more than she
can stand. The Free State, through the
executive council chosen 'by the par-
liamentary majority, has undertaken
to guarantee rights 'which England has
failed to maintain; "dwellings cannot'
be entered except in accordance withi
law"; "freedom of conscience and the
free profession and practice of relig-
ion are inviolable rights." Free ex-
pression of opinion and the right of
assembly without arms are also guar-
anteed. To fulfill these provisions
faithfully the new government will
have to reverse the traditions of re-
pression and violence which have scar-
red almost all the pages of Irish his-,
tory.
The Free State and its new consti-
tution are by no means clear of the
breakers as yet. There is till a com-j
pact, defiant Ulster to be dealt with,
outside the provisions of the treaty
and still nourishing the memory of

for the farmers than for any other
borrowers.

STRAMS
BOTH STORES

I',......

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)E
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-. 4
6:oo a.m., 7 :oo a.m., 8:oo a.m., 9:05
am. and hourly to 9:05 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops
west of Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m., and
every two hours to 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7:oo a.m.
and every two hours to. 9:oo p. m.,
i1:oo p.m. To Ypsilanti only-t i1:40
l).mf., i :15. a.mt.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50' a.m.,
12:10 P.M~.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Lim-
ited cars 8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47,
4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at
8:47 p.m.
1'

Week-End
.Seca

Caramel and
Lemon Sherbet

Dolly I

- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - {

Try thu
Delicious
Vrick
fadison
IC E CREAM
Phone 1427-
2830

Only 60c a quart
at your
dealers

192?
S

5
12
19

NOVEMBER
M T W T
1 2
6 7 S 9
13 14 15 16
27 21 22 23
27 0"8 29 30

F
3
10
17

1922
S
4
11,
18
25i

.." 140

Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH
CLASS Cleaning and Reblocking
of hats at low prices for GOOD
WORK.
We also make and sell POP-
ULAR PRICE and HIGH
GRADE hats, FIT THEM TO
YOUR HEAD and save you a
dollar or more on a hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R. Stops
at State Street)
IORENCI-ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
Schedule in Effect October 18, 1922
Central Time (Slow Time)
D X X D
P.M. A. M. P.M. P.M.
a:55 6:55 Lv. Morenci .Ar. 1:35 9:35
(Hfotel)
3:45 7 :45 .. .Adrian .... 12:45 8:45
4:15 8:15 ... Tecumseh ... 12:15 8:15
4:30 8:3o .... Clinton .... 12:00 8:oo
5:15 9:15 .... Saline . ... 11:15 7:15
5:45 9:45 Arknn ArborLv. 10:45 6:45
(Court House Square) A. M.
D--Daily. X-Daily except Sundays
and Holidays. Friday and Saturday special
bus for students leaves Adrian 1:45 leaves
Ann Arbor 4:45.
JAMES H. ELLIOTT, Proprietor
Phone o26-M Adrian, Mich.

Step Ott State, street

And eat a truly wonderful meal at a minimum
price, with the satisfaction of knowing that if
you aren't pleased your money will be refund-

ed.

WE ALSO SERVE THE BEST OFFEE IN THE CITY

Townsend H. Wolfe
Kenneth Seick
George Rockwood
Perry M. Hayden
Eugene L. Dunne
Wrn. Graulich; Jr.
John"C. Haskin -
Harvey E. Reed
C. L. Putnam
E. D. Armantrout
H. WV. Cooper
Wallace Flower
Edw. B. Riedle
Harold L. Hale

Alfred M. White
WNm. D. Roesser,
Allan S. Morton
James A. Dryer
Wim. 11. Good
Clyde L. Ha grman
A. Hartwell. r.
J. Blumenthal
Howard Hayden
V. K. Kidder
'Henry Freud
Herbert P.Bostwick
L. Pierce

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1922'
Night Editor-ROBT. C. MORIARTY
GET TOGETHER
Cheering at football games rarely
is, and never will be perfect. The sub-
ject has been worn threadbare by com-
ment, yet there is still something to
be said concerning it. The usual poor
cheering heard at Ferry field is dis-
missed with a shrug of the shoulders,
and the conventional reply, "Why
should we cheer for a winning team?.
Didn't we show what we could reallyI
do when we went to Columbus?" To
be sure, we did, but is that any rea-
son for not repeating the performance
on our own field? The Michigan
rooters out-cheered those of Ohio at
Columbu5, but the Ohio rooters cheer-
ed infinitely better than Michigan ever4
does on her. home field.I

BY DIRECT MEANS
Much has been said lately concern-
ing direct methods of teaching. Music
and the languages are the studies
which have adopted this pedagogical
device with the greatest success. But
it is in the latter group of studies, the
languages, that it has been the most
helpful.
The direct method of teaching for-
eign languages has been taken up, and
developed to a higher degree in the
continental European countries than
it has in the other parts of the world.
What might be called the Indirect
method has beenathe mainstay of
American and Engish teachers.. The
fundamental principle of the direct
way of teaching is that the student
shall learn to associate the foreign
word directly with the object which it
represents, without first having to
translate it in his ,native language.
The simplicity, and the efficiency of
this method are the most forceful ar-
guments in its favor. The class room.,
in so far as possible, is arranged to
represent the conditions in the coun-
try whose language is being studied.
The professor speaks .only that lan-
guage before the class. The picture of
an object whose name is to be remem-
bered is drawn on the board and the
name of the object is written beneath it.
By means of this device, the student,

Cross or Transverse?
The annual of the University of
Texas advertises that it will include
this year among other features a

I
:

"Medical Section of Every Man in the age-long warfare with the South.
Medical School." Much depends on the Free State's pol-I
* * icies. Radical interpretation o the
Perhaps the Knickerbocker Has at constituion would cause a complete
Last Hit Washington face-about in England's attitude and
might permanently estrange Ulster.

508 East William

One Block from High Prices

The Y. W. C. A. Cateteria

'Girls, heres your chance! . .
Think it over this week. Then come
and drop your list into the ballot in
the basement of Commerce all next
Wednesday. . . . If you wear skirts
you are eligible and are urged to
vote.. .
- U of Wash Daily.
* * *

I hate a dollar bill.
It annoys me.

It is usually ragged.
And with or without germs.
It recalls sad memories-
It is the change out of a flver.
Furthermore
And particularly
It won't stretch over
The 'Ensian
The Directory
The Class Dues!

But a government of broad vision, us-
ing moderation and firmness in estab-
lishing law and order, can win the
confidence and allegiance of the most
irreconcilable skeptics.
POLITICAL BANKING
(New York Times)
In the Middle West there is a move-
ment for agricultural credit through
governmental assistance. That marks
perception even by the farmers thatI
they do not need more government
currency, printed money, as they for-
merly sought greenbacks. Events
abroad have taught the lesson that too
much money is worse than too little.
It is still necessary to drive home the
truth that governmental interference
with credit, is hardly less undesirable.
It is to be remarked that the propos-
als referred to are made at the time'
when .the War Finance Corporation
favors assistance to the farmers in
other ways Director Meyer said in
Montana a few days ago that the cor-j
poration had assisted farmers only
through assistance to bankers who had
overlent to themr, and that the cor-

to include your laundry?

-

Speaking of Your Mother
Does she still postpone washday until Tuesday in order

It seems as if the chief difficulty in when visualizing the object which he'
this respect lies in the fact that there wishes to express, thinks of it in terms
is no organized cheering section, that, of the language he is learning. Thef
is, such as both schools had at Co- saving in time by this process is ap- t
lumbus. It cannot be expected that Ipreciable for the pupil conects the ob-
all of the spectators will cheer all of ject directly with its foreign equiva-
the time, but -there is no reason why lent without first having to call up the
a section at the fifty yard line, com- corresponding term in his native
posed as largely as possible of mer tongue.
should not be'set aside, and known as The reason for the succes of this
the cheering section. This group method lies in the fact that it most
would be expected to do the major nearly duplicates the way in which a'
part of the cheering, and in the in- child learns to speak. Imagine a baby
terims, the other sections of the trying to ask for a piece of bread if I
stands might do their share. The, first he had to think of grammaticalI
present block system of seating seems forms, and verbal conjugations.
to be absolutely ruinous to effective The method, of course, can be car,
cheering. The West stand, at one end ried too far, that is, to the extent of
of the field, is the only one which is permitting idiomatic speech to prevail:
reserved entirely for students,. and to the exclusion of grammatically cor-
most of those who have seats there are rect speech, but it is often far easier to'
freshmen who are neither able nor fit Ilearn grammar after one has learned
to cheer. a language in its colloquial form, than
Perhaps ,we are not inclined to 1 to do the reverse

I hate a dollar bill:
It annoys muh!
* , *
Or Hatutinal Tea
Where To Go, the handbook
movie hound, announces for th
a MATINEE DINNER by the W
League at the Onion.
* * *

of the
is week
IT - - '

UNCOMMON CENTS
Matching pennies
Late at night.
Played until the
Morning light.
Much I gambled,
Much I lost;
Never stopped to
Count the cost.
Lost a lot of
Needed sleep,
But I reckon
That will keep.
For my roommate's
Guile I fell-
Like to knock him
Plumb to Hell.

omans poration as a permanency was not
suitable to the banking structure of
the country.
Commerce provides itself with its
own banking currency through pro-E
duction and distribution of goods. So
should agriculture. The attempt of
the farmers to invade the field of com-
mercial credit through mandatory dis-
crimination in their favor is an at-
tempt to evade the law of supply andj
demand for both agricultural products
and credit. It is not the province of
the government to regulate prices or
credit. That is a function peculiarly
belonging to banks, government action
being justified only to prevent unfair-
ness. Those who want more deposit
currency should prov'ide themselves
with it through production and the
markets, rather than through credit of
a more or less fiat nature.
RED. The farmers are no doubt suffering..
More of their products are sellingE
close to prewar prices than are selling!

I

You know, Mothers have a splendid way of doing things
for their own children and we suppose that your Mother,
just like most of Mothers, tells you to send your laundry
home and "she can do it just as- well as not." The next
time that you write to her just tell her that you are not go-
ing to put her to all the trouble and worry of taking care
of your laundry from now on--that you have found a laun-
dry down here that will do your work very well and at
very reasonable prices.
We know that she will appreciate it because, after all, it is the little things
like this that a Mother looks for and appreciates.
THE NEXT TIME YOUR LAUNDRY
IS READY JUST CALL
YOU WILL APPRECIATE THE SERVICE

cheer for the team when it is wi-
ning, but from the luke-warm yells
that have become customary at Ferry
field, it seomns quite doubtful wheth-
er, if the conditions were reversed,
the cheering would be any better.
INTERNATIONAL MINDEDNESS

The next ten days will probably be
devoted to speculating as to just how
many people would attend the Wis-
consin game if all who want tickets
could get them.
Nature lovers are having plenty of

i
V
4
E"

* * *

WE MEND AND DARN,
CALL FOR AND
DELIVER

ONE DAY SERVICE
ON REQUEST

Ar v inw. l f o. in

4

IAre you i thI nhe union for itf
or just for a term of years? above the general level, and there are
' * !,few exceptions to the rule that manu-
factures which the farmers require
And we are taking bets on the pos- cost more in agricultural products
j sibility Harry Kipke would have of than they should. The reason is not
dodeinz nwn the Din and missing

I

The University of Michigan is a:
charter member of the American Uni-

opportunity to admire the autumn
leaves on the campus. If they were

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