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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LA£...,L. J' 1L

?OPEAN AND AMERICAN VETS PLEDGE
IE MSELVES T O DISCOURAGE FUTURE WA R

Ann Arbor Art Association
To Show Roeriek's Pictures
Paintings which are being hung in'but in every European country. His

the west gallery of Alumni Memorial
hall today, which is to be thrown
:pen to -ublic inspection tomorrow at
noon, will be one et the most not-
able collections ever displayed in Ann
Arbor, according to members of the
Ann Arbor Art association under i
whose auspices the exhibition is being
given. The collection consists of 152
pieces done in oil and oil tempers by
the famous Russian painter, Nicolas;
Konstantinovich Roerich.
These paintings have been on tour
in America for about a year, and have;
been shown 'only in the largest cities.
They were proclaimed the sensation
of the year by all who saw them when
they were on display in the Now York
Art museum, and aroused a great deal
of comment both among art critics and
the general public.
Second Big Cellection Here
The American tour is being con-
ducted by Robert E. Harshe, of the
Art Institute of Chicago, and the pic-
tures are being shown in Ann Arbor
under the auspices of the Ann Arbor
Art association. This is the second
noteworthy collection placed in Alum-
ni hall by this association this sea-
son. The first was the display of War
Portraits shown two weeks ago. Ann
Arbor is having the privilege of view-j
ing these works in advance of many
larger cities. The collection will not
be seen in Detroit until some time in,
January, when it is to be hung in the
Institute of Art in that city.
The rise of this painter has been
unusually rapid, and he has enjoyed
popularity not only in his native land,
~i

works are not, however, so well known
in this country, only two of his pieces
being owned by Americans. Both of
these works are the property of pri-
vate collectors, one in San Francisco,
and the other in Chicago.
Works of Russian Type
His first work was not produced un-
til 1897, when his piece called "The
Messenger" was shown, and won him
immediate acclaim in Russia. He has
continued painting, teaching and
studying ever since then, and has pru-
duced nearly 300 pieces, among which
are landscapes, murals, and stage set-
tings for such pieces as the Passion
Play at Starinny, operas of Wagner,
and the plays of Maurice, Maeterlinck,
the famous French dramatist.
The works which are on display here
are representative of the scope and
character of the works of this man.
They are of a typically Russian type, I
and although Roerich studied and
spent some time in Paris,she has been
influenced very little by the tenden-
cies of the French school, declares
Christian Brinton in the introduction
which he has written to the program
of the numbers shown.
-K. G. P.
Students Good Financiers
Minneapolis, Nov. 3.-Student work-
ers raised $118,826 in the first dlay's

Stadium-Auditorium drive at the tinI- Ire of $112.73 for an average individ-
versity of Minnesota. This set a fig- ual subscription.
"TAILORING SERVICES AT RIGHT PRICES"
BEAUTIFUL WOOLENS,
EXPERT TAILORING,
and the Latest in Style,
is our guarantee of satisfaction.
HAND TAILORED WRK AT READY-MADE PRICES

ALBERT GANSLE, TAILOR

113 SOUTH MAIN

(Over Chapman's Jewelry Store)

_'
..ww+. _

ReNse uativ°1 of ve' s sn Fgeace o.elII r Chawles Bertrand, ljresi dent of the interallied vets' organiza-
lio , and Ay:n Owsley, con mandcr of American Legion, are at the right center and left center, re-
spectively, qf tire table.,

Representatives o e ,000,000
vetergfs of the World war have d-
parted for their native land from the
convention of the F. 1. 1). A. C., in-

terallied veterans' organization, at I bringing about the destruction of im-
New Orleans, pledged to lead their plements of war. Alvin Owsley;,
bodies in the 'work of opposing the American Legion, signed the resolu-
overthrow of governments and in tion for that body.

There is no use trying to tell you whatwe
have in this line as it is much too large to go
into detail.
If you are in need of a pair of gloves drop in
and let us show you the largest assortment of
gloves you ever looked at.

UNUSUAL PHOBTOGRAPHS
TO BEGONE POSSESSION'
or UNIESIYLBAR

cal excellence and wide human-as well
as historical interest. When bTought
together they will illustrate many
phases of the life of today as well as
that of the past.
Already considerable use has been
made of selected photographs in publi--
cations and for stereopticon slides for
illustrated lectures.
TURKIHl UU LTAATE
DECLRED AT AN END

(AEIWEIISW'AIN, EXP~ERT
CJOOCRAHYLhAS FiN

IN

{.
,

What is con si0ered to be perhaps the
most complete collection in existence
ofph"tographs of Europe and the Near
East will become the. property of the
University library within the coming
year. The 'collection was made by
George R Swain, technical expert in
photography of the University, .while
a nember of thetUniversity expedition
to Europe and the Near East during
1919-1920 .
Mr. Swain accompanied the Univer-
sity expedition as photographer, and
was absent slightly over one year. As
equipment he had four cameras. One,
which made a negative 11 inches by 14
inaches, was especially adapted for
work with manuscripts.
Takes '4,0h0 Pieturcs
Another cameba, making a negative
7 inches by 11 inches, was equipped
for landscape work. A third instrument
was a panoramic camera, which made.
a film negative 10 inches wide, and
from 3 to 5 feet long, according to tho
number of degrees covered in the rev-
olution of the cylinder. The last can-I
era was for pictures of a size suitable
for ngking st reopticon slides and for,
enlargement work. rThe total number,
of negatives of all sizes made by Mr.
Swain was about 4,000.
Of these, about 600 were the largest
size, all reuroductions of manuscripts.
The landscape photographs cover a
wide variety of subjects, ranging from
ruins of ancient architecture to Egyp-
tian mounds and the strange forma-I
tions of the valley of the Dead Sea. In{
the same size, 7 by 11 inches, there is
also an interesting series of human
types, made for the Bureau of Eth-
nology il Washington.
The panoramic negatives show ex-,
tensive views in the Rhine region, the
flosphorus, Damiascus, P-al stine, Egypt
and the island of Palimos.
'Will Bind OCqleethn
In he two yearn since Mr. Swain re-
turned to the -nit-d Slates, he has
not yet round film, 1 make prints from
all the negatives. This work is now
proceeding, and within another year i
is hoped that the printing may be com-
pleted. The phiotographs will then be+
made up into bound volumes, accom-
nanied by descriptions and placed in
the University library.
This collection, of photographs on
the whole is characterized by techni-

Some of the Turkish afternoon
newspapers announced the abdication
of the Sultan as only a question of
hours, but the ministers apparently
take no such nessimistic view of the
situation. The Sultan's resignation,
according to tradition, would be hand-
ed to the members of the Imperial
family, and no crowned council was
called today.'
POPE lCELA RE ITALY IS
NOT IN THROES OF REVOLT
(Continued from Page One)
The Pontiff looked with satisfac-
tion on the recent speech delivered
at Naples by Mussolini, in which the
Fascisti chieftain said he realized
what tremendous authority and power
the church wielded.
Another source of contentment to
the Vatican is the fact that six mem-
bers of the Popular (Catholic) Party
are included in Mussolini's cabinet.
These six are two ministers and four
under-secretaries of state.
Lose something? A classified in
the Daily will find it.-Adv.

LAST CALL
to get $1.00 for your old
fountain pen on a
new one
Calkins-Fietcher Drug Co.
3 STORES

SERVICEABLE

WHEN
glasses

AS GOOD
LOOKING

AS

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purchased

'*1

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South State St. at William St.
THE HOME OF BETT.ER CLOTHES AND
FURNISHINGS AT FAIR PRICES

THEY ARE

MEMBERS NATIONAL
FER POWERS
NATION

BODY
ON

CON.I

(By Associated Press)
Constantinople, Nov. 3.-An end to
the Sultanate in Turkey has been
unanimously declared by the great na-
tional assembly sitting at Angora. The
executive and Ilegislative powers of
the country have been conferred by
the assembly upon the nation and the
palace of the sublime porte which,
through corruntion and ignorance for
scovral centuries provoked numerousl
ills for the country, has passed into
the domain .of history..
*A caliph is to be chosen by the as-
sembly from a number of the Osman
dynasty to succeed the Sultan, but the
re clution of the assembly announced
that the Turkish government would
remain the keynote of the Caliphate.,
The choice of the Caliph is to be that
member of the imperial family who is
the best instructed, the best educated,
the most honest and the wisest.
The assembly also decided all treat-
ies entered into by the Constantinople#
government since March 16, 1920, were
null and void. The decision of the as-
sembly was followed by a proclama-
tion of a national holiday .and the fif-
ing of a salute of 101 guns.
Notwithstanding, the assembly de-
creed that the era of liberation had at
last been entered into. The Sultan pre-;
sided this afternoon at an extraordi-
nary council of his ministers. The
Grand Visor Tewfik Pasha and his col-
leagues kissed the Sultan's hand on
the occasion of the prophet's birth-
d y, renewed their pledge of loyalty
auld expressed indignation at what was
tprmned the rash action of the Angora
government in proclaiming an end to
the Sultanate.
While nothing definite can be as-
certained regarding the decision reach-
ed today, it was ,reported in high
quarters that ther was good reason to
believe the Sultan had disputed the le-
gal character of the national assembly
(lecision, it being declared the assem-
bly was elected under abnormal cir-
cumstances.

7719

I

here you can be utterly con-
fident that they represent the
latest fashion. You need
not be worried with the idea
that perhaps they are un-
fashionable. And your com-
mon sense will tell you that
they render service.

M

. .r

r

2YT

The CAMPUS Theatre

1LAST
TIMES
7:0)-8m0

t

"We see that you see"
H. W. BECKWITH
Optometrist

Where' Lobe Is U col

£ .

PRICED $2.00 to $7.50

a m a h

a .
h t

will buy a Coronia, L. C.
Smith, Hammond, Under-
wood, Remington, Royal,
or "any rstandard type-
writer you may prefer.
See us before you buy.
0. D. Morrill

,. "

r

Two gripe hold the
sock more evenly and
neatly, and add to your "EZ2GI"
comfort and freedom of "E'Z-2-RIP
action. The garter is the vogue among young
men who want the best. 35o to , every.
where, in single-grip and the E. Z. 2 Grip;
and the E. Z. Sport Garter.
Made solely by The Thos,.P. Taylor
Co., Bridgeport. Conn.'
Featured by Leading Student
Supplies Stores

HALLERS
State Street

17 Nic'Aels Arcade

kL

j

E.. M1t,.lEN' C1 IN
ROBERT cA rr,
JAC MMIE'LOGA, N,
-R ate 1
GEUI2GE.E FR ""ovvcs 4e ",

WHEN

ii.

I

I I

a titled English beauty sweeps away convention .to pursue
the man she loves - When her darf.ng leads her into the burn-
ing Sahara, into Arabian dance revels and. treachery, through
tingling adventure and breathless romance - No wonder her
story makes a picture ten times, more startling than "The
Shiek!"
ADDED: "PARDON MY GLOVE" WIT 1BOBBY VERNON

Ann Arbor Custom Shoe Factory
Fit
H. W. CLARK
534 FOREST AVE.
PHONE 3043
£anm eoo[ iwoisn) joq y uuV

V

Farmers

Spotlight

_I

Deuces are wilder than Jokers or
Queens in this Jackpot

Friday and. Saturday

November 3-4

Ddo

GR E NNA

MIMES THEATER

1fes that tells of the beanery
kid who four-flushed a two-
gun gambler out of a year's
salary.

I

CUSTOM TAILOR

,} i

I#

Tuxedos
Evening Clothes
Golf Suits
SATISFACTION

7 Big Acts

7 Big cts.

All Seats Reserved

Tickets at Theater I

ADDED.

COMING

AlstieComedy BETTY COMPSON
13 n * O fU t NN Usa ETYEOM O

II [III

.

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