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November 01, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-11-01

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THE WEATHER
GENERALLY FAIR
TODAY
VOL. XXXIII. No. 33 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1922

AGGIE GRIDDERS
INVADE
NEXT SATURDAY
PRICE FIVE CENTS

I:.

EXPANSION MARKS
POL CY OFINEW
ITALIACABINET
FOREIGN POLICY WILL BE BUILT
ON EXTENSON COR-_
NERSTONE
MUSSOLINI NAMED HEAD
OF NEW GOVERNMENT
Advcates Complete Control of the
Mediterranean as Italian
Waterway
(By Associated Press)
Rome, Oct. 31.-Whatever the out-
come may be when the new Mussolini
cabinet goes before the chamber of
deputies there is a general agreement
that the new premier has gathered
about him a cabinet 'exceptionally
strong from the nationalist standpoint
comprising a body of men who were
leaders of Italy in the great war and
the outstanding propagandists for
Italy's territorial claims in the peace

CLASS HEADS TO

MEET

As the first step in a new plan by
the Student council tonpromote a
closer cooperation between the var-
ious class officers and that body, the
council committee on the organization
of class officers will meet the presi-
dents and treasurers of the classes of
all schools and colleges on the cam-
pus in room 302 of the Union at 7:15
o'clock tonight.
At the meeting the class constitu-
tions as prescribed by the council will
be read, and the officers will be in-
structed in their various duties. Plans
will also be discussed for a class dues
day.I
The Student council has felt for
some time that election to class offi-
ces should mean more to the men
elected, and it is with the idea of
giving the men a better conception of
their functions that the meeting has
been called.
SOP.HS AND FROSH
T O C A H N O . 1
Annual . all Games To Be Staged
Morning of Wisconsin
Ganie

NEW ANTI-AIRCRAFT DIVISION
HAS TESTS: BALLOONS TARGETS
f fJI//f j/ ~s~.QIv.Y .r . -.. '; ' J1 -f -1

JUNIOR LITS TO MEET
All junior lits will meet at 3:30
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in room
205 Mason hall for their initial as-
sembly since the election of the new
officers. The election of two members

STATE BUYS TWO
TRACKS OF LAND

of the class to the Student council' runI LflVV LU U
will take place at this time and all
members of the class are urged to at-
tend since the selection of two of its IS PORTION OF PROPERTY TO BE
members to the positions stated is of OCCUPIED BY $1,000,000
importance. BUILDING
TRANSACTION CALLS
DRIVE CAPTAINSFOR $135,000 PRIC E

PILLOW FIGhT, FLAG RUSH,
OBSTACLE RACE AGAIN USED

conference.
Foreign Policy Defined
Mussolini brings with his ministrl
a Well defined foreign policy the cor
nerstone of which is expansioi. Th
Fascisti party ever since its inceptior
a year ago has always preached th
extension of Italy's territorial claims
When former Premier Giolitti order-
ed the evacuation of Albania by Ital
ian troops the Fascisti sent up a cr
of protest against the veteran states-
men burning him in effigy and hurl-
ing stinging epithets against him i
hostile demonstrations.
The members of the new cabine
are as follows: premier and ministe
of forein affairs-Benito Mussolini;
minister of war-General Armandc
Diaz; minister of marine--Vice Ad-
miral Thaon Di Revel; minster of the
treasury--Prof. Luigi Einaudi; mins-
ter of industry--Theophile Rossi; min-
ister of finance-Signor De Stefani;
mninster of the coonies-Luigi Feder-
zoni; minster of liberated regions-
Signor Guriat; minister of justice--
Aldo Oviglio; minister of education-
Signor Gentilo; minister of agricul-
ture-Luigi Capitanio; minister of
public works--Signor Carnazza; min-
ister of posts and telegraphs-Signor
De Cesara; and minister of social wel-
fare-Stefano Cavazzoni. I
Medterrnieal Declared illiaii
Mussolini himself has declared that
the Mediterranean is an Italian lake
and be advocates complete control of
that waterway by Italy. The claim of
Greece for the Bdeecanez Islands,
was always bitterly contested in Fas-
cisti circles.
In their domestic policy the aims of
the Fascisti have not been so clearly
defined. Indeed it has been main-
tained that they have had no domestic
policy. One thing, however, has stood
preeminent in all of their domestic
actions, namely, their hospitality to
any extreme socialists .and commun-
ists.
DIECOIE UT SOON
Student Directories for the year
1922-23 will probably be on sale Nov.
6 at the usual places on the campus
according to Lincoln J. Carter, Jr.,
'23, editor. The cover of this year's
issue will be green and more complete
information regarding general cam-
pus organizations will be given than
in former issues. Many new organ-
izations have been added to the list.
The price is the same as last year,
75 cents. The general construction
of the directory and its material will
be practically the same as in previous
years. No effort has been spared to
make this issue as complete and ac-
curate as possible. Illegible writing
and ignorance of phone numbers
among the students cause most of the
inaccuracy.
'23E STUDIENT COUNCIL
?IEMBERS TO BE CHOSEN
Two representatives on the Student
council will be chosen at the meet-
ing of the Senior Engineering class
to be held at 4 o'clock today in room
348 of the Engineering building. At
this time the social committee will
also be selected. Officers of the class
wish to emphasize that the meeting
is of exceptional importance and will
be brief.
Effinger Spy tls Bd Tre C fnven ion
Prof. John R. Effinger, dean of the
College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts, delivered a lecture in Saginaw,
Michigan, yesterday before the high
school section of the convention of the
State Teachers' association, speaking

Sophomores will clash with fresh-
men in the annual fall games on the
morning of Nov. 18, at Ferry field. Ar-
rangements have been completed by
the student council committee for'
three events, the usual flag rush, and
obstacle relay race, and the pillow
fight. Members of the Student coun-
cil will act as referees throughout
the games.
The flag rush and obstacle race are!
known to the class of '25, but the pil-
low fight has not been an event since
the games of 1920. The entire per-'
sonnel of the rival classes will par-
take in the flag rush, the yearlings
defending three poles at the top of
which is the coveted flag which the
sophomores will attempt to capture by
mob action. Three teams of 10 men
each will be chosen by each class to
compete in the obstacle race. The
course is circular with two fences and
two barrels as obstacles. The best two
out of three in these two events will
gain one point towards the final reck-
oning. .
Equipment for the so-called pillow
fight consists of two sawhorses, joined
by a pole, upon which are seated two
opponents with pillows. By means of
these weapons they attemptsto knock
eachi other from their seats. Three
sawhorses will be in operation in
each of the three heats. The class
winning two of the heats will gain one
point towards the final score.
Pep meetings for the two classes
will be held Thursday and Friday ev-
enings before the contests. The com-
mittee in charge of arrangements is
as follows: W. C. Rice, '23L, chair-
man, Walter K. Scherer, '24, Howard
J. Livingstone, '23, and John R. Pol-
hamus, 24E.
SPECIL TRAIN SECURED

Three-i clc anti-aircraft gun firing on balloon target
The recently formed anti-aircra t division of Uncle Sam's fighting forces recently held its first target prac-
tice, firing at balloon targets at Fort T lden, N. Y. The aircraft guns, mounted on auto trucks, were put through
a series of tests by army experts.

NIG PASON NEW
OPILR OAD DPARTMENTI

Ghosts Come,--
Ghosts Remain

JON S.
S Al

WORLEY, NEW hEAIl)
TO BE EMINENT IN
1118 4FIELD

"In establishing a course in Trans-
portation Engineering, a part of the
Universil curriculum, the engineer-
ing school has introduced a policy,
the development of which should be
comparable to that of the department.
of highway engineering and transpor-
tation in the past ten years," stated
Prof. Henry E. Riggs, head of the
department of mechanical engineer-
ing, yesterday. "The choice of John
S. Worley as first professor of this
branch of engineering brings to the
University a man of twenty years ex-
perience in railroading. Similar
courses in other schools have not been
directed by men of this type."'
No definite curriculum has as yet
been formulated, but during the year
courses will be outlined with the co-
operation of the railway presidents
throughout the country. The depart-j
ment of economics will also be con-
sulted in this development.
Professor Riggs has received a let-
ter from E. T. Howser, western edi-
tor of the "Railway Age" with re-
gard to the appointment, in which he
says, "I want to congratulate you

Hallowe'en--Hallow-even-is past
and gone now and if Con Doyle did-
n't get out and buttonhole a couple
genwine spirits last night and find
out have they got the Volstead Act in
heaven its his own fault.
There was plenty a ghosts in the
mediate vicinity of Ann Arbor and
thereabouts, las night and will be on
more than one night b'fore next Feb.
Specially right now before the mid-
semesters. The Big Chief Ghost is the
ghost of Flunk. Banquo's shadow
ain't even a patch on him. He's the
King Kleagle and the Most Noble
PooBah of spirits.
The studes have a few other ghosts
to shiver about too. There's the
ghost of the held- ip monthly allow-
ance, the sweetie-may-turn-me-down
ghost, the hazing ghost, (for fresh-
men only) and the ghost of a poor
recitation, which haunts all hands.
The women-you say it-have a few
ghosts all their own, like, the does-he-
love-me ghost, the I-wopder-is-my-
nose-shiny ghost, and a whole flock
of others included in which are the
ghosts of I-don't-know what-to-wear,
hole-in-my-stocking, mouse-in-the-
bureau, and heavens-what-if-I-don't-.
get-a-bid-to-thegame.

upon securing Mr. Worley for this Yep, Hallowe'en is gone, but the
work, for I am sure that he will en- ghosts we have still with us.
ter upon it,with the enthusiasm, and 1__ .
that his broad acquaintance among' --+
railway men and the ideals for which ' Chimes Gridiron
he stands will be of great value to the Out
University in the development of this Issue u Friday
new course of instruction."'

I
I
a
1

LUBO PARTY SHOWS
GAIN IN ENISH OTE
PLAN TO PLACE 450 CANDIDATES
IN FIELD FOR COMMONS
ELECTION
(By Associated Press)
London, Oct. 31.-The English Labor
party will place more than 450 candi-
dates for the house of commons in the
field at the next elections as compared
with 361 candidates at the 1918 elec-
tion, according to plans of the party
leaders which have just .been an-
nounced.
The Labor leaders are elated over
their successes in the last election and
the increased number of votes which
were forthcoming in many of the
country districts of England. Some
additional strength has been shown by
Labor candidates in the bye-elections
held in various constituencies since
1918, notably in city districts.
Preparations for the forthcoming
election have been elaborated, and
practically every district in the coun-
try , has already been organized. In
this organizing work the Labor federa-
tions and unions have been allowed a
free hand, and it is largely on their
efforts and strength that the structure
for the campaign battles has been
built.
The National Association of Labor
Agents has been training agents
throughout the country, and hundreds
of volunteer workers are qualifying
for agency work. There are at the
present time at least 2,400 local par-
ties of one kind or another, and more
than 800 women's sections in connec-
tion with these parties. The indi-
vidual membership of the Labor par-
ty, in addition to the affiliated unions
and societies, includes 80,000 women.
Of the 75 Labor members in the
present house of commons, 71 will
seek re-election, and candidates have
been chosen to contest the remaining
I four seats. Ten women are numbered
among the Labor candidates.
As soon as the election is announc-
ed the leaders will start an extensive
campaign to include speeches, meet-
ings and demonstrations in the cause
of Labor.
U. S. REFrUSES TO
REOPEN__CONSULATE
FINDS NO FOUNDATION FOR BRI.
j TI.SI CHARGES AGAINST
AMERICAN CONSULS
Washington, Oct. 31-The United
States government has decided defin-
itely not to reopen the American con-
sulate at New Castle, England, until
the British government has uncondi-
tionally withdrawn charges it made
against Consul Slater and VicenCon-
sul Brooks, and publicly 'exonerated
the two officials. The British foreign
office has been made aware of this de-
termination, it was learned today,
reached after exhaustive investiga-
tion of the situation which disclosed
no foundation whatever, to support
charges which led the British author-..
ities last August to cancel the exe-
quarturs of Slater and Brooks.
I Atnnoffo riih rnnnw .

Will Discuss Methods at Union
Meeting Tomorrow
Night
20 TEAMS WILL SOLICIT
MEMBERSHIP SUIBSCRIPTIONS
All captains of teams who are to
take part in the Life Membership
drive of the Union to be held Nov. 7,
8, and 9, will meet at 7:30 o'clock to-
morrow night in room 302 of the Un-
ion. At this time a discussion of the
campaign will be held by those in
charge.
The drive will be made by 20 teams
each consisting of 10 members and-
one captain who will be directly re-
sponsible to the Chairman of the com-
mittee in charge of the drive. The
chairman of the committee .in charge
is C. A. Campbell, '24E. The two as-
sistant chairmen are: David M. Mar-
tin, '25, and William K. Kidder, '25E.
A life membership costs $50 which
is payable through five annual pay-
ments of $10 each, or which may all
be paid outright upon subscription.
The student subscribing for a life
membership on the installment-pay-
ment plan may begin his payments
upon subscription or at any later
time within one year following grad-
uation. The solicitor will not make
money collections,'his business being
only to shave students subscribe for
life memberships.
Payments for memberships will be
made at the offices in the basement of"
the Union.
POSTER CONTEST'INNER
Rosemary Lawrance, '24, was an-
nounced last night as the winner of
the poster cohtest conducted by the
Michiganensian. A large number of
posters were submitted in the con-
test, the purpose of which was to ob-
tain suitable advertising material for
the sales campaign of the year book
that will be conducted from Nov. 7
to 10.
Of the remaining posters submitted
those of B. D. Ramsdell, '25, and Beth-
any Lovell, '25, were accorded hon-
orable mention by the judges. These
and some of the other posters of bet-i
ter grade submitted will be used in
the campaign. The winning posters
will be exhibited in the window of
Graham's book store today.
Either five dollars in cash or a copy
of the 1923 Michiganensian will be
presented to the winner. Judges in
the contest were Max Schrayer, '23E,
managing editor of the Michiganen-
sian, Sheldon Brown, '23, businessi
manager, and Marion VanEvery, '24,,
art editor.
The sales campaign in which the+
posters will be used will start on the
campus on Nov. 7 and will continue
through Nov. 10. The book this year
will sell at the price of $5, a reduction:
of 50 cents from last year's price. In
the case that over 3,000 copies are or-
dered the price will again be reduced
to $4.50, and the 50 cents surplus will]
be refunded to subscribers.+
WISCONSIN TICKET'
SALES INCREASING
Ticket sales for the Wisconsin game
have made a decided jump sine the
Michigan victory over Illinois Satur-
day, the only remaining seats being
those in the West stand. The Ohio
game speeded up the number of in-
coming applications and the Illinois:
game has made the influx greater than

ever.
SHarry A. Tillotson, of the Athletic f
office, urges that students who have
not yet mailed in their applications
do so immediately so that they will
be able to get the number of tickets
desired before the remaining seats
are taken up. In a statement issued
yesterday Mr. Tillotson said, "Since
Michigan's victory ,of last Saturday
ticket applications for the Wisconsin

Sites of Former Delta Kappa Epsilon
and PsI Upsilon Houses
in Purchase
Lansing, Oct. 31.-The state admin-
istrative board today authorized the
purchase of two tracts of land, as a
site for the new law building, by the
University of Michigan..
The total cost of the property was
given at $135,000.
Two plots of. land are included in
the authorized purchase. They are
the sites of the present Psi Upsilon
and the former Delta Kappa Epsilon
fraternity houses. An agreement as
to the price of the land was termin-
ated some months ago, and the action
of the administrative board today
completes the transaction.
To Start Work in Spring
Construction of the law club and
dormitory which will occupy the land
will be commenced in the spring. The
building was made possible by the gift
of more than a million dollars by an
unknown donor, having as its purpose
concentration of the interests of the
law students and alumni for the pro-
motion of research in law.
Two Houses to Go
The Psi Upsilon house, situated on
the corner of South' University ave-
nue and State street, is the oldest
structure in Ann Arbor devoted en-
tirely to fraternity use. The other
plot of land affected. by- the purchase,
the second one to the south on State
street, is the site of another old
structure, originally belonging to the
Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, but
now occupied. by another organiza-
tin, pending its removal by the Uni-
versity. The Delta Kappa Epsilon
fraternity now occupies the Millan
house on Geddes Heights.
Present plans for the proposed
building include the property only as
far as the southern line of the pres
ent Acacia fraternity.
New Office of Student Council Will
'H9use Records of
Organization
Work on the Student council'office,
on the tiird floor of University hall,
is rapidly nearing completion, build-
as now being employed painting and
furnishing the interior. It is expect-
Ed that the council will be able to
ta0e possession within a week.
This new office will Increase the
scope of the council's work by making
members available at all times. It is
planned that the president, and other
officers will have definitely appointed
office hours during which they may be
consulted by the students on topics
which should come to the council's
attention. Here, too, the members of
the council can meet each other fre-
quently to discuss their work and
thereby make the action of the vari-
ous committees more smooth and ef-
fective.
Records of the organization will be
kept here from year to year and will
at all times be available. The office
will be equipped with a telephone
and all organization mail may be ad-
dressed there. The acqulsition of this
headquarters is the outcome of sev-
eral years of work on the part of the
council and was only approved by the
Regents early this fall.
Type writrs
Many people are looking
around for typewriters right
now. Theses are having to be
written, and every one knows
how much better work can be

done pn a typewriter than by
hand.
Have you a typewriter for
sale? There are a lot of stu-
dents on the market for good
used machines and you can sell
yours very easily by- putting a
classified ad in The Daily. Call

Mr. Worley will arrive in Ann Ar-
b h LL Jain U(LI d II n r wll k tlU1 p ihi

t or in anuary ana win taiie up te
R I[work at the beginning of the second
semester.

Arrangements have been completed
by the C. M. & St. P. Ry, in connec-
tion with the Michigan Central Ry.
to run an all steel electric lighted
train from Madison to Ann Arbor,
Mich. and return for the Wisconsin-
Michigan game on Nov. 18.
The otrain will leave Madison at
15:30 p. m. on Nov. 17, arriving at Ann
Arbor at 6 a. m. Nov. 18. Returning
it will leave Ann Arbor at 11:30 p.
in., allowing all to partake of the fes-
tivities there that evening, arriving
at Madison at 10 a. m. Sunday.
This will be a special train, making
no stops at intermediate stations, and
the entire train will be transferred at
Chicago to the Michigan Central Ry.
It is expected that a large delega-
tion will make this trip and it is urg-
ed that all intending to go, make
their reservations at an early date.
Scholarships Offered at U. of W.
Scholarship, personality, and busi-
ness acumen are the bases of two new
scholarship awards at the University,
of Washington.
Washington students now have
thirty-eightnscholarships offered to
them each year, since Frederick andj

i

YOST WRITES FOR.
ATHLETIC JOURNL
"The Function of College Athletics
and Some Things That Are Menaces"
is the title of an article by Coach
Fielding II. Yost,, appearing in the
September issue of the Athletic Jour-
nal. This magazine, edited by Majorl
John L. Griffith, athletic commission-
er of the Western Conference, is de-
voted to the interests of college
coaches throughout the country and,
is now in its third year of publica-
tion.
Under the first division of the artl-
cle headed "The Relation of Athlet-
ics to College Life," Coach Yost states
that, since boys are sent to college to
obtain an education and- to become
better fitted for life, athletics should
ever remain a contributory factor to!
this main object of college training,
that an athletic program should never
be made an end in itself, and that col-
leges should carefully control these
programs to avoid losing sight of the
main purpose of college training. He I
adds that long trips, extended practice l

Football will be the principle feat-
ure of the November issue of Chimes,
campus opinion monthly, that will be
placed on sale this week end. The
number will be devoted almost exclus-
ivey to articles and pictures of thisI
activity.
The cover design is a painting of
Harry Kipke, '24, carrying the ball. it
was painted especially for Chimes by
Hunter G. Griffith, '21. The fronts-
piece is also relating to football, be-
ing a photograph and a- drawing of
Paul Goebel, '23, captain of the team.
This page is the work of W. H. Ja-
cobs, '26.
The principle article used in the is-
sue will be an interview with Paul
Goebel written by John L. Stebens,
'24.
Y. W. C. A. PLANS SOCIAL SERVICE
WORK FOR UNIVERSITY WOMEN
Notices pertaining to vacancies in
the social service field have been sent.
out by the university Y. W. C. A. to
all girls on campus who have signed
up for such work. The social serv-
ice department of- the University
hospital has looked over the names of
applicants which were turned in this
fall, and work will be given them as
soon as possible. Investigation is be-
ing made by the Y. W. C. A. as to
all forms of social service work inj
the city, so that girls not assisting in
the hospital department may be plac-
ed in some other field.'
PROF. CLAVEL SPEAKS BEFORE
GRADUATE ENGLISH CLUE
Professor Clavel of the French de-
meeting of the Graduate English club
held in the narlors of the Helen New-I

i

and playing seasons

are detrimentalj

I

Nelson has added two to the list. One
of the new scholarships is open to a
boy and the other to a girl. They
carry a stipend of 250 dollars for bothj
freshman .and sophomore years.
Montieth Club to Hold First Meeting
Rev. Henry Lewis. of St. Andrewsj

in that they unduly interfere with al
boy's study. He urges the properl
control of athletics not only because
of the great number of students who
might take part, but also on account
of the practical lessons derived from
athletic competition.
Under the second heading entitled
"There Should Be More Equality of

I'

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