100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 24, 1922 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1922 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

L HL SECOND
HEALTH CONFERENCEI

Missouri Woman
In Congress Race;
l i

Langing, Oct. 23.- Discussion of
three new problems, the legal back-
ground of public health, the Shep-
pard-Towner law and the prevention
of goitre, will occupy a large share of
the program for the second annual
conference of health officers and pub-
lic health nurses to be held here Dec.
4 to. 8 under the auspices of the
Michigan Department of Health in co-
operation with the Michigan Public
Health association.
The conference which is designed as
a short term of intensive training in
public health work will include lec-
tures on the various communicable
diseases, rural health problems and
quarantine. National health author-
ities and leading health workers of
Michigan will appear on the speaking
program.
Final arrangements are being made
here to accommodate more than 1,000
health workers. Invitations have gone'
out from the department of health to
health officers, physicians and nurses
in every village and city in the state-
"Health officers in the state should
avail themselves of this opportunity
for practical instruction in public
work," says Dr. R. M. Olin, state health
commissioner. "Local public health
work is very largely an index to the
civic pride of any community, and the
health officer is an official whose eco-
nomic value has been clearly demon-
strated. Preventing disease, reducing
the number of deaths and enforcing
sanitary laws are such obviously
worth while activities, that the import-
ance of giving the health officer every
opportunity for increasing his effici-
ency need not be emphasized."

WESTERN UINION OFFICE
EXPLAINS GAME SERICE
Few students realize the great num-
ber of preparations that must be made
to get the results of an out-of-town
game to Ann Arbor.
According to A. C. Baumgartner,
manger of the Western Union office
in Ann Arbor, they are essentially as
follows:
A wire is run from the office of the
local branch of the telegraph company.
to the field and thence to Ann Arbor.
The office at Ann Arbor runs lines to
the Daily, Hill auditorium, and others
that have subscribed to the service.
An especially good operator takes the
messages at the different points for
if one operator fails the whole system
is held up until this operator catches
up again. The wires are connected
so that there are no relays needed be-
tween the field of play and the re-
ceiving station. At the playing field*
there are usually two men to the
wire. One, with a pair of field glasses
relates the plays as he sees them, the
other sends them over the wire.
At the Hill auditorium the receiving
apparatus was located in back of the
stage. Th operator typed it off as it
came over the wire and as each play
was completed a messenger took it to
the men running the electric score
board. Similar methods were employ-
ed at The Daily, Huston's, and the
Majestic theater Saturday.

U. S. Civil Seivice UNIVERSITY HAS
Exams Announced
Tnted States Civil Service Comnis MOH C

sion has announced the following ex-
aminations for the month of Novem-
ber: Nov. 7th, Mechanical Engineer,
Coast and Geodetic Survey, Physical
Director, Veterans Bureau Hospitals;
Nov. 8th, Junior Librarian, Junior
Psychologist, Assistant in Home Eco-
nomics, Laboratory Aid in Bacteriol-
ogy, Laboratory Assistant, Bureau of
Standards, Assistant in Education,!
Department of Labor; Nov. 22nd, Jun-
ior Engineer, Junior Physicist, Juniorl
Technologist, Bureau of Standards.
Information blanks and application
forms, for any of the above mention-
ed examinations, may be secured
through the secretary of the local,
board of civil service examiners, ei-
ther at the main postoffice, or at sta-.
tion No. 1, Nickles Arcade.
DR. ROBERT F. SHEPERD TO
GIVE SERIES OF LECTURES
"Practical Application of Religion
in this New Age in the Life of thej
World" will be the subject of a course
of lectures to be delivered at the
Church of Christ by Dr. Robert F.
Shepherd of the Illinois Relations
Committee of the Chicago Association
of Commerce. The lectures began at
7:30 o'clock Monday evening and will
contiue each night at that hour, upI
to and including next Sunday night.
Dr. Shepherd will also lecture at
10:30 o'clock Sunday morning.
It is announced that Dr. Shepherd
is a forceful speaker and suggests in
his addresses many interesting solu-
tions of the religious problem con-
ing the world today.
These addresses are open to the
public.

V

-.S. U. BACKFLASHES-

Seldom is a cheer born unforeseen
on the field of battle, but it happened
in the last half of Saturday's clash.
"Beat Michigan," chanted the Ohio
State masses in a steady rhythn.
Some'maize-and-blue adherent start-
ed the cry, "Can't do it, can't do it,"
in exactly the same meter. The
throng took it ' up and the spontan-
eously created slogan rolled back
across the field to the Scarlet and
Gray sections.
The crowd reacted to every play.
After Michigan's first field goal the'
tomb-like silence of the Ohio tiers,
contrasting sharply with the roaring
chaos of the Michigan. sections, was
strongly reminiscent of the occasion,
so similar yet so different, when Ohio
made its first score against Michigan
on Ferry field "last year.

Mrs, Luella St- Clair Moss
"Lower taxation for the masses," is
the chief plank in the platform of Mrs.
Luella St. Clair Moss candidate for
congress from Missouri. She is the
first womanto make the race in Miss-
ouri. She is a Democrat.
when they reached the top deck and
realized its sheer steepness of angle.
But their uneasiness passed off in
inost cases through the gripping in-
terest of the scene before them.
Not all the thrills came from the
game itself. The auto pilgrims had
enough adventure to make a Tom Mix
melodrama. Many were fined for
speeding and narrowly escaped miss-
ing the game. Then there were the
tragedies of burned bearings, empty
gasolene tanks, exhausted batteries
and tons, of motor trouble to wring
the hearts of the auto travellers. But
Michigan spirit took the' "silent H"
entirely out of "tragedy" for invar-
iably passing motorists stopped to
lend a hand: to the troulbled ones. No
serious accidentshoccured,'however.
COPE WILL ADDRESS MEETING
TODAY AT UNITARIAN CHURCH
Professor Henry F. Cope, of Chica-
go, General secretary of the Religious
Education association,. will speak at
4 o'clock this afternoon, in the Uni-
tarian church at State and Huron
streets. His subject will be "The Re-
ligious Method of Social Develop-
ment". The meeting is open to all
who wish to take advantage of the op-
portunity to hear him.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

NO MORE TO BE ORDERED UNTIL
LAKE NAVIGATION
CLOSESI
On the basis of former consumption,
there is enough coal on hand at thel
present time to heat the University
buildings until the first of the year,
according to Mr. Edward C. Pardon'
head of the department of buildings
and grounds. Additional shipments
which are expected any day will run
the power house until Feb. 1.
No more coal will be ordered until
navigation on the lakes closes in De-
cember. The University can obtain
any amout of coal today at the ex-
horbitant prices of four dollars and
more f. o. b. at the mines. Officials
believe, however, that when the enor-
mous fuel shipments to the upper
lakes are closed, the price will be
greatly reduced on rail-shipped coal
"We think we will be able to ge
all we want at three dollars or less a
ton f. o; b. at the mines,"' declared
Mr. Pardon. "At any rate the Univer-
sity is certain to have an adequate
supply of coal for the winter's needs."
Approximately 161 carloads, or 8050
tons of coal have been purchased by
the University up to the present time,
and a good share of it has arrived at
the oower house.
Canadian Parliament Member Dies
Halifax, N. S., Oct. 23.-Dr. Edward
Blackadded, member of the Canadian
Parliament, is dead here. He was 50
years old. He represented Halifax
county in the House of Commons.
SHORTHAND
Beginning Class - October 30
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William Streets
SLEEP ANYWHERE, BUT
EAT AT REX'S
THE CLUB LUNCH'
712 Arbor Streetr,
Near State and. Packard Streets

WRI%3LEI

CLASSROOM CRISIS
TEMPORARILY OVER
The classroom situation, at one
time so critical in the literary school,
has adjusted itself pretty well by nowj
and things are running along fairly
smoothly, say officials. New classes
have been formed, abandoned rooms
have been reinstated, and courses
have been limited to meet the over-
crowded condition.
There are, they say, still individual
examples of difficulties in obtaining
classrooms, even though the general
situation is well taken care of.
Readjustments take place contin-
ually, and though they bother the ad-
ministration they do not cause any
real trouble. ,Fear has been express-
ed however, as to the disposition of
rhetoric classes in the University
when West hall is torn down, for
rhetoric is one of the largest depart-4

S. C. A. DISCUSSION GROUPS
FOR FRESHMEN NOW OPERATING
S. C. A. discussion groups, organiz-
ed for the purpose ofd settling for
freshmen problems confronting them
upon entering the University, are now,
organized, and include a large num-
ber of yearlings. The groups are con-
ducted by upperclassmen who meet
with the new men during the week at
Lane Hall.
A meeting of all the groups will be
held Oct.30 at which Prof. J. R. Brumm
of the department of rhetoric and
journalism is expected to speak, and
at which questions relating to all in-
dividual groups will be discussed.
METHODIST BANQUET TONIGHT;
YOST TO ADDRESS FRESHMEN
Coach Fielding H. Yost will be the
principle speaker at a banquet to be
given in honor of all the freshman
men of the Methodist church at 6
o'clock tonight in Wesley hall.
The program will be of an informal
nature and emphasis will be placed
on the get-acquainted side. All fresh-
man men of the Methodist church are
urged to be present.
Scientists Indorse Sauerkraut
The eating of sauerkraut tendsato
the prolongation of human life, ac-
cording to some medical scientists.

It's BENEFICIAL! Aids
appetite and digestion, helps
to keep teeth clean and
breath sweet.
It's LONG-LASTING! Full
of flavor that won't chew out.
It's ECOlNOMICAL! A five

ments in the school and A
the only building that ha:
exclusively by any one d
HALF ILLINOIS ITER
STUDENTS ATTEN

j

Urbana, Ill., Oct. 23.-ChurcTi
ing is not out of fashion at .the 1
versity of Illinois. It is estima
that half of the 9,200 students
rolled at the University attend chu
at least once on Sunday. The ma
ity of these students are active cht
members.
Student foundations, costing hu
reds of thousands of dollars,
seeking to develop the students'
ligious interest.
DENISHAWN TICKETS at Uni
sity Hall, main corridor, Tues.
Wed., 2 to 5 p. m.-Adv.
Lose something? - A classified
the Daily will find it.-Adv.

Just before the Illinois game, Fri-
day, October 27, the Hallowe'en Danc-
ing Party at Dexter. Kennedy's Soci-
ety Six Piece Orchestra will furnish
the music. Hats, whistles, and every-
thing for fun. Busses leave Calkin's
Drug Store at 8 p. m.-Adv.
If you lose your dog, a daily classi-
fied ad will find it for you.-Adv.
Michigan T v and Chimes for $4.50.
STRICTLY HOME COOKING
HEPLER'S
STUDENT
LUNCH
409 EAST JEFFERSON ST.

I C *F

Pf
r
1,
I
,.
.w

y

8

w

-1

The tendency to cheer when Ohio
was penalized, displayed by a few of
the ,unthinking, was strongly hissed
by the great majority of maize-and
blue supporters.
During the last five minutes of play,
when it was apparent that Ohio was
doomed to decisive defeat, the Ohio
cheerleader put across a spirited
cheer for the Wolverines. Many com-
mented on the, splendid sportsman-
ship thus shown.
Only the unusual construction of
the stadium prevented the Michigan
throng from surging across the field
and carrying their warrios off the
gridiron at' the final 'whistle. En-
trance and exit to the stadium-was en-
tirely from the rear and the front bar-
rier was practically insurmountable.

(.. centpackageprovides
~ j treat for the whole' fam
&~
*5
r--
WRIGLEY'S
wrapper
premiums;

3 a
jY e

-__.

i
, L. C.

A :
I- r ~~ {
/.- ,
K1/ 1

I'U

When

Wfl P,J .-- --v~iia-- v.
Smith, Hammond, Under-
wood, Remington, Royal,
or any standard type-
writer you may prefer.
See us before you buy.

li

Winter

0. D. Morrill
1 7 Nickels Arcade

i1

i

I

Imu
Im
pr

C80

Comes

I

Though Michigan's cheer leaders
were late in getting on the field, Mich-
igan had the honor of giving the
first cheer. It started of its own ac-
cord somewhere in the block M, and
was taken up by all 'Wolverine sup-
porters-a cracking "locomotive."
Betting ,Was little in evidence in
Columbus prior to the game and it is
doubtful if much money changed
hands as a result of the Mchigan vic-
tory.

Changes of season necessitate, a corresponding change in Milady's wardrobe.
At present we are featuring our winter models. Here you will find authentic
styles in every conceivable material. We advise a prompt selection, that you
may have the benefit of unbroken assortments.

Emma B. Fogerty's
SPECIALTY HAT SHOP

Cravenettes

d
gabardines

"That's great stuff but it's darnI
poor on this unseasoned concrete,"
said one spectator, evidently a con-
struction engineer, as the field artil-
lery banged forth 21 deafening sa-
lutes as a part of the dedication cer-
emony. Every shot shook the huge
stadium perceptibly.

117 EAST LIBERTY STREET

Tweed and Cord Top Coats

AT LOWEST PRICES

F

-6

We

are open until

Our 35c Students'

"Tom Wye" Coats and Sweaters

Many persons having seats in the
top tier suffered nervous spasms
POWDER
PUFF
BEAUTY
PARLOR
In order to facilitate our
service we have
employed
THREE MARCEL GIRLS

the wee sma' hours

Plate Lunch

is

of the morning

the best possible

Leather Jackets, Vests, Hunting

Coats, Sheepskins, Over-

A
W

coats, etc.

The Utopian Cafe
1219 S. UNIVERSITY

0. D. Woo Arm Shirts

Corduroy and Blanket Shirts

FOR APPOINTMENT
002 .0

CALL

r I 'T .rmr_

T

A,*n T T

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan