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October 14, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-14

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THE !

-"HIGAN DAILY

e _

* less friction to hamper the perform-I

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
ITN IV'E RSITY OF Ml~ICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all
news dispatches credited to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.
En'erei at the postoffice at Ann, Arbor,
Michigan, as second. class° matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.-
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street. -
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, q6o.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
if signed,, the signature not necessarily to
appear in print, but as anevidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
left at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION 13. STAHL
City Edior....James B. Young
Asistant City ditor..........Marion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman ......Ei. R. Meiss
Night Editors-
RalEh Byers Harry Hoey
J. 1P. Dawson,: rr J. E. Mack
L. T. Ilershdorf-r R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donahue
Sports Editor ..... .V.. H. MePike
Sunday lI agazine Editor....Delbert Clark
XVome-'s Editor .........Marion Koch
Humor Editor ... ..onald Cony
Conference Editor............H. B. Grundy
Pictorial Fditor ..............Robert Tarr
Music Editor...... ....... .H. Ailes
Assistants
M. 11. Pryor John Garlinahouse
Dorothy bennetts Isabel Fishet
Maurice fleiman Winona A. Hibbard
R. A. Billington Samuel Moore
W. 1. butler '. C. McShane
II. C. Clark W.1B. Rafferty
A. h. Connable W. 11.Stoneman
Evelyu .1. Coughlin Virginia Tryon
Eugee Carmichael P. . IWagner:,
Bernadectte Cote A. P. Wbik
Wallace F. Elliott ' Franklin Iickman
";. l. Fiske Joseph Epstein
Maxwell Fead J. W. Ruwitch
BUSINESS STAFF.
Telephone 960
BUSINgSS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising ............John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising..... .. .Edward F. Conn
Advertising........Walter K. "Sc'herer
Accounts................Lauene H.Favrot
Circulation............. avid J. M. Park
Publication............L. Beaumont Parks
Assistants

>wnsend TI. Wolfe
enneth Seick
or,~e Lockwood
:rry Al. 1layden
ugenle I,.. iunnle
"Craulich, Jr.
hn C. llaskin
arvey E.? Reed1
1,_ Putnam'-
1). Armantrout
W. Cooper
allace Flower
:w. B. lRiedle
aol. L. IIfIl(*

Alhred M. White.
SWin. D. 'Roesser
Allan S. Morton
James A. Dryer
WVm. 14. Good
Clyde I. Hagerman,
A. Hartwell, Jr.
Blumenthal
1Howard Hayden
NN. K. Kidder
Henry Freud
ilerbert P. Bostwick
1, Pierce

ance of its engines than is encountered
by the land vehicle. In a race of
commercial airplanes conducted
Thursday at Mt. Clemens, the winner,
achieved an average speed of 135
miles per hour.
Will the future see an even greater
revolution due to the airplane than
that which was caused by the automo-
bile? Imagine having your groceries
delivered safely at more than two
miles per minute. Or picture the
well dressed business man going to
town in thirty seconds. Why, even
Santa Claus will have a couple of
hours to spare if he makes his round
in an airplane.
STANDING FOR "VICTORS"
A custom that has sprung into
vogue during the course of the last
year or two rs that of standing up
while "Victors" is being played.'
There is nothing particularly objec-
tionable in honoring so splendid a
composition as 'The Victors" through
this courtesy, except that the impres-
sion s likely to be given outsiders
or students new to the University that
this is the University of - Michigan
song-the one which should be sung
standing and withheads bared, at all
times,
In the past Michigan has reserved
this respect for "The Yellow and
Blue." The other songs such as "Var-
sity" and "The Victors" should be
sung earnestly and with all due en-
thusiasm, but the highest respect in
the way -of standing with heads bared
.should be reserved for 'The Yellow
and Blue."
MORE OPTIMISTS, PLEASE
The time is not far distant when
many people will begin asking them-
selves:isn't it time we gave the college
man a little encouragement? During
the period of four to six years which
a man (spends in college he will re-
peatedly hear charges that he is
learning impractical things-that he
is delving in a world of artificiality,
which, rather than an advantage, will
be a distinct hindrance to him during
hin first few years in the world of
practicality.
A man does his best work when lie
is certain that he is working for
something valuable. He may start in
on his college career full of enthusi-
asm. Then as the remarks of the
ecclesiastics , reach him, whether
through stoken word or printed
page, he b'egins to' doubt. Doubt is
the best known dampener of enthu-
siasm. If enough disillusionment is
thus brought to bear upon a student,
he may go through the last years of
his college work very listlessly, his
mind being not on his studies but on
what will come after graduation. In
short he will be worrying-worrying
about the future at a time when wor-
ry can be of little avail.
No, one will deny that it is a good
thing to think of the future. But
when students are so continuously re-
minded of the "dark and stormy fu-
ture" that awaits them, the effects of
their lessened ardour for study will
certainly be reflected in their work.
Many students are exceedingly con-
scientious. Any pessimistic forecast
as to their future success will affect
them deeply. And no one can do his
best work when he is 'downhearted.
Advice from olderpersons who are
calloused to the blows of the world
is always welcome, but a note of en-
couragement mingled with such a
message is likely to do infinitely
more good than the all too frequent
gloomy outlook.
EATING SICKNESS
A glaring weakness of the Ameri-

can people with reference to their1
choice of diet is their constant cater-
ing to the dictates of their palate
rather than to the dictates of their
common ,sense.
Just recently, in Ann Arbor, a group
of boys were served a meal which,
while far from being elaborate, was
wholesome and sensible. It did not
include the usual portion of meat;
nor was there the customary tempting
desert. Loud protests were heard
from the group. Many ironic remarks
were made as to the, desirability of
eating such food.
This instance is illustrative of a
nation-wide trait. The American's in-
sistense upon the most savory and
palatable food is no doubt due to his
ability to pay for the best taisting
meals. Yet it is obvious to everyone
that the rural poulation thrives much
better on the well known "corn and
beans" than do their city friends who
prefer French pastrieb. Some day
the public at large may realize that
what pleases the palate may not nec-
essarily please the stomach. They may
realize that meat at every meal is
not a necessity; but, on the contrary,
not even conducive to good health.
When people learn to conquer the
urgings of these pet fancies in diet
they 'will have made a great advance
in the direction of correct living and
a more untroubled existence.

THE RHYMING DICTIONARY
"The men who made our language,
Said the Lover to his Miss,
"Were truly kind to Poets
When they made 'bliss' rhyme with
'kiss'."
But a Cynic, overhearing,
Said, 'Have you thought of this?
'Tho bliss may go with kissing,
A kiss may be remiss."
The Lover thought and answered,
"At least for eyes of blue
You'll find no rhyme disgraceful
To offset 'true' and 'you'."
The Cynic laughed and whispered,
"Such thoughts you must eschew,
For eyes of heav'n's own color
May lead you to a shrew." -
The desperate Lover shouted,
"Then find for maiden's hair
A rhyme to steal the charm from
Such words as 'fair' and 'rare'."
The Cynic winked his eyelid:
"Well, now, I do declare,
I've heard it said before now
That tresses will ensnare."
The Lover owned him beaten
And stood disconsolate;
The Maiden raised the gauntlet:
"For 'woman' find a mate."
The Cynic bowed before her
And boldly doffed his hat,
"Like others of their species,
Most women rhyme with 'that'!"
SHE-GUN-DAH.
* * *
TilIS IS A PICTURE OF ABAIENE
ONE SECOND AFTER HE SPOKE
TO A. I).-1000 WHO WAS FIGUR-
1NG OUT THE BELOW
Dear Caligula:
Two days ago you made the
startling. statement: "Only 1080
more days of school." Being of
an analytical turn of mind, to sat-
isfy my own curiosity I seized my
typewriter and commenced to fig-
ure it out for myself. What was
my disappointment when I dis-
covered that we are really not
going to have 1080 more days of
scholarly bliss, but only a measly
218, deducting Xmas (sic) and
spring vacations, but INCLUD-
ING Sundays, and Washington's
and my birthdays. Such inaccu-
racy is ill-befitting the Chef who
toasts the rolls (I bow). I feel
sure that you will correct this
glaring discuiepancy pronto (at
your earliest convenience). Ah,
a THOUGHT! Perhaps you were
calculating the distance between
you and graduation, which, allow-
ing yourself approximately two
full years and two summer ses-
sions over the time you would
normally require, would total in
the neighborhood of 1080 days.
Please inform me.
A. D. 1000*.
1000 what?j
* * *
DE BOID CHUNES IN
Listen here dis is De Joisey Boid
broadcastin an I aint got no ferry
tails to tell yes a-tall I tink some bim-
bo wich hes from Noo Yawk is gittin
jehis and wantsa cop me stuff If ya
got my manyuskripts wich dey was
lost on de campus Toisday hows to
bring em up to de Daley offis
DE JOISEY BOLD.
* * *

T SED ROLL
IOUR SOUL HOTFRS I
OVER TANDERt-
~,BILT TODA~YL.

p

CAMPUS OPINION
October 11, 1922.I
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Recently, while enjoying the sooth-
ing balm of a quiet pipe in a secluded
corner of the Union lobby, I was an
unobserved eavesdropper upon four-
students who were discussing with
some heat the apparent lunacy of
those men who insisted upon accom-
panying women to the football game.
The theme of their conversation
immediately started me on a train of
thought of my own, namely, the fact
that in common with three or foui
thousand other men on this campus I
firmly believe the taking of women to
football games to be detrimental in
the extreme-both to the spirit of the
crowd in the stadium, and so indirect-
ly to the team itself.
I do not mean that women should
be barred from games, for the ma,-
jority of modern college women are
as intelligent concerning football ast
women may be expected to be, despite'
frequent semi-humorous allusions toS
the contrary. I merely contend that
they should be given separate por-r
tions of the stadium at Conferencef
games.
Because of the truth of the state-r
.ment concerning the impossibility of
serving two masters, I think it ad-
visable to separate the sexes when
they congregate at Ferry field. Wom-
an's charm is undeniable; there is,
in fact, no escaping it permanently..
But when the football team of our
University, the men on whom we have
pinned our faith and hope for victory,
line up against an opposing team(
it seems to me that every Michigan
man in the stadium should back up
that team with all the spirit and vo-1
ciferation of which his lungs are ca-
pable. And this is impossible if men
have escorted women to the game.
In the presence of a charming Be-
ing-when in public, at any rate,-
the average university man is quite a.
different person from the creature he
is when in the company of others of
his own sex. He is shyly reticent in
the matter of cheering, and positively
negative when it comes to individual
shouts of encouragement to the men
on the field, simply because he is
afraid that theBeing beside him will
consider his form poor, or something
equally smacking of masculine asin-
jnity.
Last fall we heard a great deal
about the lack of support given the
team. Later, we had it demonstrated
what genuine support would accom-
plish. Wherefore, I would voice the
opinon of many-that the engaging
charm of the fair sex be eschewed
during our Conference games, and
that the men of Michigan turn out
in body, ready and willing to back the
team, in defeat as well as victory.
EDITORIAL COMMENT

MICHIGAN

LAST EDITION OF

:-: A T *

BO TH STORES

r,
1

Michigan Daily

and Chimes for $4.50.

"

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oc
am., 7:00 a.m., 8:oo a.m., 9:o a.m. and
hourly to 9: 05P.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
ran Arbor)-g :47 a.m., and every two hours
to 9:47 p.M.
Local Cars East Bound--7 :o a.tn. and ev-
ery two hours to 9:00 p.m., i i :oo p.m. To
Ypsilanti only---r :4 p.m., 1:15 a.m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m., 2:i0
p., in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo -- Limited cars
8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 P.M.

LET US SHOW YOU

6

The, Remington Portable

To Jackson
p.n.

and Lansing--Limited at 8.471

1922
S
s
.1
8
29

M
2
9
16
2:3
30

OCTOBER
T W T
3 4 5
10 11 12
17 18 19
24 25 26
31

F
6
13
20
27

1922
4
14
21
28

Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When
you want , hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned inside out
with all new trimmings are like new.
We also make and sell POPULAR
PRICE and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar or more on a hat. We give
values and quote prices which cannot
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere
else. Try us for your next hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.TR. Stops at State Street)
ADRIAN - ANN ARBOR
BUS LINE
Leaving Hours From Ann Arbor
Central Standard Time
X D S.
8:45 A.M.
4:40 P.M. 12:45 P.M. 6:45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays1
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only'
JAS. H. ELLIOTT, PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-M
DR. W. S. MILLS
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
616 First Nat'l Bk. Bldg.
Office Hours Phone
9-12; 1:80-5 321-F1
The Official
CLASS TOQUES
We have a better toque

This typewriter is light in weight and has the standard key-
board. Built especially for the student and traveling salesman.
Even with its light weight and small size -= it has proven dur-
able and long-lived. It is a most satisfactory typewriter for
individual use.
THE MAYRSHIE Co.
STATIONERS - PRINTERS - OFFICE OUTFITTERS
PHONE 1404
112 SOUTH MAIN STREET

Announsing
that:

John Ward
Me'sShoes

i

SONG

B OOK

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1922
Night Editor-LEO J. HERSHDORFER
1'AY BY PLAY
Those who are unable to accom-
pany the team to Vanderbilt will be!
able to see tthe game this afternoon,
play by play, in Hill auditorium. Par-
adoxical though this :seems, it will
nevertheless be made possible by the
installation of a telegraphically oper-
ated score board in the auditorium.
The apparatus is the gift of the alum-
ni. It i fifteen feet long, eleven feet
wide, and in the shape of a football
field. By means of lights, both teams,
all plays, the player carrying the
ball, and the number of yards gained
can be shown. Only one man is
needed to operate the machine.
The Regents' have granted permfs..
sion to use the building as a place to
exhibit the board because of the fact
that the receipts from an admission
fee of thirty-five centis will be used
to lift a note of fifteen years' stand-
ing on Alumni Memorial hall.
A chance to watch the team is
worth thirty-five cents at any time, es-
pecially when it is away from home.
The knowledge that this money will
be used to help free" a University
building from debt ,should be an add-
ed incentive.
AUTOS OF THlE AIR
Not so very long ago a creation
called the horseless carriage began
taking the place of the wagon. It was
much more efficient, could travel any-
where from eight to fifteen miles an
hour without difficulty. And farsight-
ed engineers saw possibilities of rais-
ing this speed capacity to almost any
degree.
As a result thesautomobile vas de-
veloped to the stage in which the
present time finds it. Not only has it
largely displaced the horse and wag-
on, but it has revolutionized society
to an extent which few people con-
ceive. Farmers, instead of being is-
olated because of the fact that they
live ten or twenty miles from the
nearest town, now are like residents
in the suburbs of that town. When-
ecvor caprice so dictates, they ho
into the flivver and beat it for the

II1

wil display at
MICHIGAN
thruout the coming collej year with the new-
est and best in conservativly correct footwear
at prices ranjing from $7 to,$10. The first-dis-
play of the season wil be at:
KYER'S
Corner N. Univ. and Thayer
Today and Monday
John:Wa rd
Men's Shoes.
GENERAL OFFISES: 121 DUANE STREET
NEW YORK CITY

FRIDAY 13
In Memoriamn
The day has dawned
Bright and clear-
Friday, thirteen.
The heathen quakes
With palsied fear;
Bootleggers over-malt the beer.
Friday, thirteen.
I knew a man
Who moaned "Beware."
Friday, thirteen.
In him it threw
An awful scare.
Friday, thirteen.
He got a room
And shut him there
And closed it tight
That Death might spare1
His fearful soul
And strike elsewhere.
Friday, thirteen.
And then he died
From lack of air.
Friday, thirteen.
* * *
"HOLD TRIALS FOR PRINCETON
OPERA" G'Lord! What's the sentence
for committing opera?
* * *
"In the Morgue" must be a stiff play
to do.

CRANKS
a . (Daily Texan)
A distinguished instructor in a for-
eign university who was visiting this
country was asked what, in his esti-
mation, was the chief defect of
American colleges. His reply was
that the student bodies do not contain
enough cranks. Every movement that
results in social progress requires
leaders, and leaders are men of indi-
vidual independence. Any reform
must start with individuals, and only
after these individuals have con-
verted others to their beliefs, do they
become part of the masses who must
ultimately accept that reform. In the
mean time, they must pay a penalty,
for anything out of the ordinary is
deemed queer, anda reformer in the
beginning certainly is out of the or-
dinary. Sam Jones once said that
'it takes a crank to turn things." If
so, the business of a college that
wishes to perform its duty is to de-
velop cranks that can turn things.
* ,* *
Here in the university, a faculty
man recently remarked that the stu-
dents' attitude is paradoxical. Let a
professor dare to be himself, let him
be or pretend to be queer; and the
students will flock to his courses in
large numbers. But let a student
adopt the same policy, let him deter-
mine to follow his own course regard-
less of others, and he is promptly
dubbed a fool and looked upon all too
frequently with contempt.
* * *1
This attitude is not altogether in-
defensible. The paradox does not
seem so. self-contradictory as might
be supposed when a factor is con-
sidered that plays a large part in
student judgments. There are two
kinds of cranks. One is the student
who tries to be different for the sake
of being different. He is the super-
ficial egotist whose chief delight is
adulation of himself as being uniquei
among his fellows. The other is the
man whon is queer because he cannot

I

WAGNIE R C1 A
jor rah, izsdn e 1&4,f

NEW YORK SHOPS
140 1-03 Broadway
Just belo Times Square
and in downtown,
Manhattan and Brooklyn

PHILADELPHIA SHOP
1221-23 Chestnut Street
Just Belo
Hotel Adelpkia

11

II'I

Ill

YEA! .TEAM!

YEA! BAND!

YEA! "FAT!"

I

Eleotric

ore boa rd.
will showe every play of Today's
Game five minutes after
it happens

TODAY AT

HILL AUDITORIUM:

.Admission35c

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