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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 14, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 1 JAJ

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. GO ON SALE

Old Indian Fighter Quenches
Thirst For Education At 73

Trans Will Carry Students
Football Classic; Tickets
Limited

to

TRAINS TO LEAVE1
VRIlDAY N4IiT AT 10 P. ,f

Nelson, Neb., Oct. 13. - Colonel
George Lyon, of Nelson, Neb., 73, is
proving the theory that a man is never
too old to learn, according to his
friends here. I
Despite his advanced age, the col-
onel, after three years of intensivg
preparatory work, has enrolled as a
student at Harvard. Although he has
been in the east for some time getting
Former Premier
May Form New
Danish Cabinet

Railroad and Pullman tickets tq
Columbus for the O. S. U. game will,
go on sale at the Union at 10 o'clok
this morning, when they will be sold
as long as they last, as the number
available is limited. Students are
urged by those in charge of the sale
to buy early, as there will no sale
Tuesday, unless it is found absolutely
necessary.
Round trip tickets will cost $6.00,
exclusive of the Pullman charges. An
upper berth round trip, will cost $6.00[
and a lower $7.50. Passengers can1j
not 'go onW -way Pullman and return-
in a day coach; they must ride in
the, eame train ' both ways. Therg
will be no obtion'allowed in this mat-
ter.
TwoPuliman trains,:'which will bd.
ready for occupancy at 10 o'clock
Friday night, will leave Ann Arbor at
midnight, and will arrive at Colum-'
bus at 5 o'clock Saturday morning:
Columbus time. Four day coaches will
leave Ann Arbor at 6:30 oclock Sat-
urday morn'ing ,and will arrive in Col.,
umbus at 11 oclock in the morning:
On the return trip, the day coaches
will leave Columbus at 6:30 o'clock
Saturday night. The firt Pullman,
train will leave at 10:30 o'clock, and
will be ready for occupancy at 9
o'clock. The secondtrain will leave
at a quarter of 12, the berths being
ready at 10 oclock.
MIG cH,.A9N INVAE
VANDERILT 'OA
(Continued from Page One)
times. Br'own, the least experienced
of the backs but a man McGugan ex-
pects to develop" into a star of the
first rank, will team with Reece at
the half back 'posts." The other two
men in the backfield will be Captain
Neely. and Kuhn.
Evcny man on the line'that will op-
pose ivfiehigan is .a veteran but the
forward wal has been McGugin's
chief worry 'during,the early practice.
McCullough, a 200 pound end, ,has
been nanmd to oppose Goebel. He is
said to be a remarkably fast player,
'vho covers more 'than hi' share of]
ground. and. -is strong; defensively.
Walker, at tackle, is the other out-
standing figure on the line.
Michigan will line up just as it did
in the Case game with the exception
that Capt. Goebel will replace Neisch
at right end, Uteritz will call signals,
and Muirhead will go back to his us-
ual tackle post. This will give Yost
Goebel and Kirk, ends, Muirhead and
VanderVoort, tackles, Rosatti and
Steele, guards, Blott, center, Uteritz,
quarterback, Roby and Kipke, half-
backs, and Cappan, fullback.
Linesmen May Be Shifted
In case Rosatti, who has been
troubled with injuries during the past

ready for his school work, his friends
here are still talking of his remark-
able desire for knowledge.
Here in Nelson, Colonel Lyon is
known for a good many accomplish-
ments, among them his ability as a
reader. Early in life he gained local
fame by his recitations from the best
known authors. He has been a bank-
er, real estate broker, an abstractor,
and the owner of "The Nuckolls Coun-
ty Herald."
His business activities have not pre-
vented him from serving the people.
He organized a local military company
of which he became captain. This was
in the days when the Indian was held
a menace to the advancement of the
civilization of the white settlers, and
while the Indian scare was at its
height in western Nebraska, he went
with the "boys" to combat it. After
the uprising was put down he was ad-
vanced to a colonel, a title by which
he still is known.
During his early life in Nelson, pets'
were a hobby with the colonel, and he
devoted much of his timto their care.
Rare birds, white rats, white mice.
rabbits and dogs ,were his favorites.
He also gives considerable energy
to the cultivation of flowers.
Mimes Offerjigs Please
(Continued from Page One)
and D. W. Bacome, '24, were cast in a
novelty dancing act, in which Weir
carried a female impersonation.
T. E. Dewey, '23, S. of M., accom-
panied by Max A. Ewing, '23, S. of M.,
rendered a. numbeD. of vocal selections
which. the audience found unusually
pleasing, calling for two encores from
the singer.
The final act was a one act play
"In the Morgue" in which D. J. Reese,
'25E, and E. W. Brownbridge, '25,
played. The act was directed by C.
W. Guske, '22, who played the part of
the king in the '22 Opera, "Make it for
Two." The play was of a tragic na-
ture, occuring in a morgue. A po-
tent means is taken in the play of
I)ringing out a valuable life lesson.
The opening program, played last
night, will be given for the final time
at 8:15 o'clock this evening at the
Mimes theatre, the general price of
admission being 50 cents.
P1.dnceton Has Largest Enrollment
Princeton university announced yes-
terday the largest enrollment in its
history, the number of undergradu-
ates being set by the registrapr at
2,184. This is 217 greater than the
enrollment of 1921.
Corduroy Coats $6.50 up. Wild and
Co.-Adv.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

RHAIL[WORKERS MUST
LOSE STRIKE RIGHT
-LEE
'ice-President of Pennsylvania Lines
Says Liaber Must Surrender
Privilege
PROBLEM TOO BIG FOR ONE
MAN TO HANDLE PROPERLY
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, Oct. 13.-Railroad labor
must surrender the right to strike if
the railway situation is to be stabil-
ized and "the right of the people to
uninterrupted transportation service
is to be permanently secured," Elisha
J. Lee, vice-president of the Pennsyl-
vania lines, declared in an address to-
night at the annual banquet of the
American mining congress.
"I am not prepared to say at the
present time," Mr. Lee said, 'that we
should go to the lengths of absolute-
ly forbidding railroad strikes by spe-
cific statutes, nor would I attempt
otherwise to lay down any particular
method whereby the acceptance of this
basically correct principle may be
brought about. I am only sure of
one thing, and that is that it must be
accomplished in some way if the rail-
road labor situation is to be stabil-
ized."
ARMY TRANSPOT TAKS
261 FROM BURNING HULK
San Francippo, Oct. 13.-The United
States Army' transport Thomas is
steaming over the Pacific ocean to-
night toward San Francisco with 261
passengers and members of tie crew
of the liner City of Honolulu, which
is drifting, a burned out hulk, on the
sea line to the southwest. Army trans-
port officials here figure that the
Thomas should, arrive Sunday. The
point where the Thomas took the pas-
sengers afd the crew from the ship
was near the West Farallones, about
620 miles southwest of San Francisco,
the Army transport officials said.
Word from the transport to the As-
sociated Press today by the wireless
service of -'the Federal Telegraph
company was to the effect that the
passengers were in good spirits, and
that they evidently showed no fear
when the fire crept about them on the
liner and forced them into the sea to
await what proved to be a kindly fate.
Word from the West Farallones, to-
night was to the effect that the Hon-
olulu was still burning. A report told
of the caving in of her superstruc-
ture, this destruction starting first
with the collapse of one of her
stack.

WORK SOON TO BE STARTED
ON LAYING OF PIIQNE CABLES,'
Commercial Manager James J. Kelly
of the Michigan State Telephone cow-
pany, stated yesterday afternoon that
the work on the new cables would
undoubtedly be started soon. No deli-1
nite approval has been given to the
final estimate as yet.
Mr. Kelly said that the rapid growth
of the southern and eastern portions
of Ann Arbor had been the cause of
the congestion and delay in filling tel-
ephone orders. Another factor of the
delay, according to Mr. Kelly, has
been the dearth of supplies since the
war. At that time all supply stock
was shipped abroad, and in addition
there has been a demand for tele-
phones above normal since the Arm-
istice was signed.
At present the company has on hand
150 orders that will be taken care of
as soon as the new cables are laid.
STUDENT JOB. SITUATION
REACHES NORMAL AGAIN
Almost all the students who apply
for jobs at the University Employ-
ment bureau are being acconmodat-
cd, according to Miss Stewart, who
has charge of the work.
Although most of the steady jobs
..

President Marion L. Burton is in
receipt of a request from Thomas 0.
Marvin, chairman of the tariff com- rwo siows
mission at Washington, for references Satu day Night
of students here who may be employ- 7 ad i P. M.
ei i expert work on the federal tar-
iET schedules. Cost ac'countants are MAIL ORDERS accompanied by re-
als''nelded, the request states. mittance in full and self-addressed
The letter will be sent to the prop- envelope will be honored in order of
or University department, it was an- receipt. BE SURE to specify WHICH
rnounced in the President's office. performance Saturday desired. Make
all remittances and send orders to R.
~Cord1uroy Coats $6.50 up. Wild and F. Bodal, Mantager Hartman Theatr~e,
Columbus, Ohio. Prices: $1.10, $1.5.
Co.-Adv. $2.20, $2.75, including Tax.

have been filled there are a number ]
of. odd jobs offered, most of which
are taken the same day they are re-
ported. Among the kinds of work
that are i the office at present are
aptp) picking, digging, landscape
Wor., general house work, and one
for posing.
TA IFF BOARD NEEDS EXPERTS
IN ACCOUNTING 1)EPART)EN T

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LAST TIMES TONIGHT

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MILLERS BARBER SHOP

Wm. A. Miier, Prop.

- I!Otto -

Service and Courtesy
1114 S. University Ave.

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R C A D '

J. C. Christensen

Former Premier J. C. Christensen
has been asked by the Danish king
to form a new cabinet to succeed that
headed by Premier Neergaard, which
resigned.
few days, is unable to start the game,
Blott will move over to the guard
berth and Slaughter will go to center.
Keefer and Steger are almost sure to
be called on before the final whistle
blows as the two sophomore half-
backs are going to be needed before
the schedule of big games is finished.
Just what other substitutions will be
made will depend altogether on thel
way the first string men are going.
With Vanderbilt, according to all
dope, looking strong, it is improbable
that many of the second string men
will get in.
UNION TO GIVE RETURNS

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Complete telegraphic .eturns of the
Michigan-Vanderbilt football game to-
day will be given at the Union. Ac-
cording to present plans, the returns
will be given in the tap room, the lob-
by on the main floor, and the ball
room.
They may alsb be given in the up-
per reading room. The returns of the
game will begin as soon as possible
after the game begins.
LET US EXPLAIN
.. tOUR RADIO SETS
t r-you in person. You'll soon
discover how simple they are to
operate. After a hard day at
the office you will find new
stimulus and amusement in ils-
teming in on the radiophone.
Enjoyment for the whole fain-
ily can be had by this latest in-
vention.
LABORATORY APPARATUS
COMPANY
(Incorporated)
306 South Main St. 2nd Floor

SPEO' AL GALEo

WENZEL,
Is

LAMES RUEDE BOUBMI UPPERS

SATURDAY
SPECIALS

AlT ] 7 PJ

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WINDOW
SHADES

-foC

(36-Inch Width)

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7iAD1 E°3

I S, H 0., 3 u 0 uI

OLD ENGLISH
FLOOR WAX

POUND
CANS

asp

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«Ofir uutr of tr4tgan weir~

X77,7 n ±T~ I'

PECIAL

RELEASE

11

On Sale Today

Chicago

Suez

IN their endeavor to give you the latest hits at the earliest possible moment--the
Victor Talking Machine Company have today released 4 records, embracing the most
select in hits, and played by the nation's best dance orchestras.

CHICAGO ............................. Fox Trot..................WHITEMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
EARLY IN THE MORNING BLUES......Fox Trot................................. THE VIRGINIANS

SUEZ .................................. Fox Trot ....... ............CLYDE DOER AND HIS
I WISH I KNEW..........................Fox Trot.....................CLYDE DOER AND HIS
I'LL BUILD A STAIRWAY TO PARADISE. Fox Trot.....................WHITEMAN AND His
YOU REMIND ME OF MY MOTHER..................................WHITEMAN AND His

ORCHESTRA
ORCHESTRA
ORCHESTRA
ORCHESTRA

.
;Jib ona{ r. eurin.+n ir t ;Y
6/.a:(Y trial: r; y

"CLIFTON"

V'add to the bea uty of 'Bnir.h
he charm of sipelon and frin ,
.md you avC a wi'idovw shad(!
' isthictiv ely vttracti ctand du
abc

ALL OVER NOTHING AT ALL................................AILEEN STANLEY-BILLY MURRAY
I'LL STAND BENEATH YOUR WINDOW TONIGHT AND WHISTLE. ..AILEEN STANLEY-BILLY MURRAY

-,,)nie in and let us tell You
:bout these shades.

turr

III

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