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October 14, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-14

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1

'LED; PR(
SHOWERS

ABLY

I

p.,Ier

Lit i!3a

Ar
fiatt

Watch The Game
On Score
Boards Today

I

VOL. XXXIII. No. 18 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1922 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CE

SENIOR LITS NAME[
CLLSS'PRESID ENT
MR. NORCOP WILL hEAD SENIOR
LAWS; R M. RYAN TO
LEAD JUNIORS
SOPH AND JUNIOR LITS
POSTPONE NOMINATIONS
Fresh Englineers to hold Assembly
Next Wednesday to Elect
Officers ,
All classes in the Law school, the
senior lit class, and the senior phar-
cnics chose their class officers in the
elections held yesterday. Both can-
didates for vice-president of the Jun-
for laws were declared ineligible and
the two candidates for secretary of
the senior law class received the same
number of votes. The vote in the
senior, literary class was reported to
be unusually light..
Those chosento lead their classes
for this year are as follows: senior
lits, president, Robert Gibson; vice-
president, Ruth Werkbser; slecre-
tary, Elizabeth Hoyt; and treasurer,
Burton E. Dunlop; senior laws, pres-
ident, M. P. Norcop; vice-president,
J. B. Boyle; secretary, Gladys Wells
and G. W. Rouse, tied; and treasurer,
R. L. Stuart.
Junior laws chose for president R.
M. Ryan; vice-president, both candi-
dates disqualified because of ineligi-
bility; secretary, W. M. Seeley; and
treasurer, J. H. Allen; freshman laws,
president, J. Wolf; .vice-president,
Forest Hoffman; secretary, V. J. Voor-
heir; and treasurer, W. A. Ewart;
senior pharmics, president, H. A.
Whitney; vice-president, T. C. Dan-
iels; secretary, H. Anderson; and
treasurer, T. F. Thorsberg.
Due to poor attendance at former
meetings, nominations. of the sopho-
more and junior literary classes have
been declared invalid and meetings
for the purpose of nominating. new
candidates will be held the first of
next week with the elections oming
in the latter- part of the week. Fresh-
man engineering students will hold
an assembly for thepurpose of nom-
inating candidates for the class of-
fices next Wednesday.
UTS ELLALL . .
T ICKETSBY MNDA
BIG DEMAND FOR SEATS BY OHIO
ROOTERS IS CAUSE OF
ACTION
Owing to the fact that football of-
ficials at Ohio State are finding them-
selves unable to fill all the orders for
tickets for the Michigan-Ohio State
game at Columbus they have wired
Athletic association officials here to
return immediately all tickets whicl
are not sold to students or alumni
here.
As a consequence Harry Tillottso
announced y sterday at 't' athletic
ocice that all the remaining tickets
for the Wolverine-Buckeye game will
be placed on sale at the o&i e in the
Press buiierri on Monday morning
for all those who desire them. If the
total number remaining of the 18,500
tickets are not sold before the fol
lowing morning they will be sent back
to Columbus where they are in great
demand.
Naturally offleials here do not want
to deprive any one who wants tickets
of the opportunity of securing them
as long as there are any left. At the
rate at which reservations are now
coming in it looks as if there will

be no tickets remaining after Monday
night as it is expected that there will
be only a few remaining to put on
general sale on Monday. However,
if any remain they will be shipped
back to Columbus next Tuesday.
All the tickets which have already
been reserved by students and towns-
people here will be mailed out to-
day and Monday. It is expected that
more than 75,000 visitors will be in
Columbus for the game a week from
today, which will make it the largest
affair of its kind in the middle west.
Photographers Wanted for 'Ensian
Tryouts are wanted for the photo-
graphic staff of the 1923 Michiganen-
sian. All persons interested in pho-
tography and desirous of getting some
practical experience in this work are
asked to report to the Michiganensian
office in the Press building or to
phone Vlack, 1656-J.
Spanish Society Plans 7 Lectures
"Some Aspects of Contemporary
Spanish Life", Antonio Garcia Solal-
inde, is the subject of the first
Af a curiantnc^fr ~ ann 1I and-ro

NAVY'S MYSTERY PLANE FAVORED
A S WINNER IN PULITZER AIR R ACE

CHEERLEADERS TO
RECEIVE UNIFORMS
Varsity cheerleaders will have uni-
forms, probably in time for the Ohio
State game, declared E. C. Haug, '23E;
chairman of the cheerleader commit
tee of the student council, last night.
Cheerleaders will be provided with
white sweaters with some distinctive
insignia which has not yet been def-
initely selected, and white flannel
trousers.
The money for the uniforms will
probably come out of the proceeds of
the tag day which is being tentatively
planned by the Student council.
SEN. SINK CLIMS
COAL ,BILL WL
STOP PROFITEERS
E LARES ACT WILL EQUALIZE
DISTRIBUTION OF FUEL
IN MICHIGAN /
ACTION WILL PREVENT
STATE-WIDE SHORTAGE
Legislator Predicts Groesheck Will
Nominate Potter to Post of
Administrator

YOSTMEN INVADE VANDERBILTGIIDN Og 1 S
EI6HTH CONTEST FOR RIVA

Mystery Plane and Lieutenants Sanderson and Rittenh ouse, Navy Pilots
A tiny monoplane ,dubbed the "mystery ship" of the navy, is favor ed to win the Pulitzer air derby t
Detroit otday. The little flyer will be piloted by Lieutenant Sanderson. The "Bee Line" racer, another doubt
enshrouded navy plane, Lieutenant Rittenhouse, pilot, also is conceded a chnace to win. Many of the leading[
army, navy and civilian flyers will take part in the meet.

PIROF. BLANCHARO
TO A11TTEND MEET
To Act as University Representative
at National Highway Trans-
port Convention
MORE THAN 1,200 DELEGATES
ARE EXPECTED TO ATTEND
Prof. Arthur H. Blanchard, head of
the department of highway engineer-
ing and highway transport, has been'
appointed by President Marion L.
Burton as the University's official rep-
resentative at the second national
conference on Highway Engineer and
Highway Transport Education to be
held in Washington, D. C., on Oct. 26,
'27, and 28, under the auspices of the
United States commissioner of edu-
cation and the National Highway Ed-
ucation board. More than 1,200 rep-
resentatives of universities, the Unit-
ed States Bureau of Public Roads,
state highway departments, and the3
automotive industries will be present
at the convention.
Addresses on various educational
problems and reports from 10 nation-
al committees on various phases of
highway engineering and highway
transport education will be present-
ed at the meetings. Professor Blanch-
ard is to deliver an address on "The
Trend of Highway Transport Educa-
tion" on Oct. 26, and will speak on.
'English Transport Practice" on Oct.
27. Prof. Hershel C.. Smith, assistant
professor of highway engineering, will
present as chairman the report of
the committee on "Graduate Courses
in Highway Engineering and Highway
Transport," and Prof. John C. Bate-
man, also assistant professor of high-
way engineering and in charge of the
state highway laboratory, will serve
on the committee on highway labora-
tory 'durses.
Michigan's prominence on the pro-
gram, according to Professor Blanch-
ard; is in recognition of the fact that
this University has more 'graduate
students, in highway engineering and
highway transport than the combined
enrollment in such a course in all
other universities.,
Bids for Trip Concessions Open
Bids for concessions to sell ice
cream, candy and magazines on the
trains to and from Columbus will be
received at the Union until noon to-
day. Information can be obtained in
the lobby of the Union.
The proceeds of the sales on the
trains will go to the Union swimming
pool fund.

Galoshes Slop,
Forecast Snow
It was on South State Street during
the rain the other day. Students with
coats tightly buttoned were hurrying
homeward, happy in the thought that

GRID GRAPH 0iILL
BE READIY TODAY
Electric Scoreboard Will Make Game
Realistle; to be Installed In1
1Ill Auditoriuni

another day had passed.
As one of these walked rapidly
through the rain he heard a sound
strangely familiar-as if a soft foot-
ball were being dragged along the
ground.
Looking up he saw a girl and a
man walking toward him. That was
not unusual. He looked again and
then he saw-the fair damsel was
wearing galoshes, the first of the sea-
son.
The homeward bound student but-
toned his topcoat more tightly about
him.
"Winter surely is near," he thought
as he trudged on through the rain.
'ENSIAN WANTS SENIOR,
PICTURESBY DEC2. 4
NEW TIME LIMIT ESTABLISHED
TO AVOID CONFUSION OF
PREVIOUS YEARS
"All seniors must have their pic-
tures taken before Christmas vaca-
tion," is the ruling of Sheldon M.
Brown, '23 business manager of the
1923 Michiganensian. In former years
seniors were allowed to submit their
photographs at a later date, but this
method caused much confusion and
delay in getting the 'Ensian out.
This year seniors must obtain an
order from the Michiganensian office
in the Press building, before any
photographer will take a sitting. Such
orders may be obtained at the 'En-
sian office any afternoon from 2 to 5
o'clock. Brown declares also that to
have pictures in the 1923 'Ensian at
all, negatives must have been made
and proofs returned to the photo-
graphers by Dec. 24. This will give
the studios an opportunity to com-
plete the work in time for the date on
which all photographers must submit
their senior prints, Jan. 3, 1923.'
This final date, Dec. 24, does not ap-
ply to group pictures which will be
taken only during the month of Jan-
(uary.-I

VARSITY BAND, YELLMASTERS
WILL BE ADDED ATTRACTION
Complete reproduction of the Van-
derbilt game by means of the newly
acquired electric scoreboard, to be
shown in Hill auditorium, accompan-
ied by Michigan songs and yells led
by the Varsity band and cheerleaders,
making it almost as realistic as the
actual game itself, is the aim of the
Alumni association for this after
noon.
All the apparatus necessary for the
re-creation of the. game has arrived,
weighing in all over half a ton. It
will be installed by Mr. Potter, one of
the designers of the grid graph, who
is expected to be in Ann Arbor this
morning and who will supervise the
operation of the board during the en-
tire time
Game Starts at 8:30
The game is called at Dudley field
in Nashville for 2:30 o'clock Central
standard time, 3:30 o'clock Ann Arbor
time. The doors of Hill auditorium
will be opened at 2:45 o'clock Ann
Arbor time. The Alumni association
believes that the demonstration this
afternoon will be second only to that
of the actual game.
The grid graph reproducer is con-
trolled entirely by electricity. Elec-
tric lights show the exact position of
the ball on the field, the path it fol-
lowed, play used, men involved in
play, yardage gained, and all the oth-
er details of the game. For instance
if Michigan were to use an aerial at-
tack, the light "forward pass" is lit.
The ball is passed from the center,
Blott, whose- light is flashed, back to
say, Steger, who then passes to Goe-
bel. Both the last two men are shown
by their respective lights and the path
of the ball down the field is traced
in the same way, so that the audience
knows exactly how the play worked
on:.
A special Western Union wire has
been leased direct from Dudley field
to the operator in Hill auditorium.
This will enable the play to be flashed
upon the board almost instantaneous-
ly after it is made. Two men will
be used in operating he board, as well
as two students, with a knowledge of
Michigan's team and the technicali-
ties of the game will be at the wire
to receive the returns. This, it is
thought, will do away with all delays
caused by relays in telegraphing or
insufficient men a the receiving end.
This is the first time that an official
demonstration of this kind has ever
been held and students have so been
allowed to witness their team in an
outside encounter. The Board of Re-
gents gave the Alumni association the
use of Hill auditorium in order to ac-
comodate the entire student body,
with the understanding that if the
thing is a success, it will be made a
permanent feature in all of Michigan's
away-from-home games.
Band Will Play
The band, which is holding drill
practice today for the Ohio State
game next Saturday, on Ferry field
will, on the completion of its drill,
march directly to the auditorium in
time for the game to begin. Two men
from the cheerleading squad will al-
so be present, William H. Frankhaus-
er, '22L, head cheerleader and Wal-
ter E. Lustfield, '25, the heavy man of

Senator Charles A. Sink of this
district returned last night from the
special session of the legislature at
Lansing, which adjourned late yes-
terday -afternoon after passing a bill
providing for a fuel administrator to
deal with the present acute coal
shortage in Michigan.
It is 'Senator Sink's belief that the
bill, which is modeled after similar
acts by the New York and Ohio leg-
islatures, will take care of the situa-
tion. "Of course, the act will not
create coal," Senator Sink said, "but
I believe that it will help equalize dis-
tribution and prevent profiteering."
According to Senator Sink,. Gover-
ner Groesbeck's calling of the legis-
lature represents his desire to give
the state a business admiistration.
"In. many of the towns cf, Michigan
there is hardly any coal, and if the
recent warm weather had not occur-
ed, the state might be facing a gen-
eral shortage now. It was time for
some action to be taken."
W. W. Potter of Jackson, who has
been acting administrator, will prob-
ably be appointed by Governor Groes-
beck to act as administrator under
the provisions of the bill, according
to Senator Sink. The administrator
will begin immediately with his depu-
ties and assistants, and will contin-
ue until March 31, by which time the
crisis will be passed or the legislature
may again act.
The special session of the legisla-
ture began Tuesday when a bill was
introduced in the House of Represent-
atives and a duplicate bill in the Sen-
at. Aftr discussion and a number of
amendments, the Senate passed its
bill Thursday, and the house dis-
carded its act and amended the Sen-
ate bill.-
A Conference committee, of which
Senator Sink was a member, appoint-
ed, and they effected a compromise,
which was agreed to by both houses
yesterday afternoon. Governor Groes-
beck has not yet signed the bill, but
it was drawn up by him and the at-
torney-general, there is little doubt
as to his doing so.
Senator Sink said that there was
some opposition to the bill by coal
dealers atsfirst, but stated that the
majority of the dealers now feel that
it is for their best interests. The pub-
lic is strongly in favor of the act, he
said.

First Mimes Bill r
Pleases Audience
Opening with five vaudeville acts,
all different in nature, together form-
ing an excellent program( the Mimes
Repertoire company began its year's
program, last night at the Mimes
theater.
The bill opened with a number of
popular selections by Rhodes Broth-
ers orchestra. "Jimmie (James J.)
Johnson, '23, joining with the orches-
tra in the next two numbers and of-
fering two popular songs to a recep-
tive audience. The act ended with a
specialty number, "Every Day," by
the orchestra.
Buckley C. Robbins, '23, and C. J.
Dresbach, '24, were featured in a
comedy act which was rather short,
but well received. Gordon Weir, '23,
(Continued on Page Two)
CHORA9L UNION HAS.
REGDRD SEAT SL
All Tickets For Concert Series Sold
Out Twe Weeks in Advance
of First Concert
SINK ATTRIBUTES CAUSE TO
HIGH QUALITY OF PROGRAM
What is declared by Charles Sink,
secretary of the School of Music, to
be a record seat sale for the Choral
Union concert series, came to a close
last night when it was announced that
the orders for seats had been more
than sufficient to absorb the seating
capacity of Hill auditorium.
This is the first time in the history
of the Choral Union program that all'
seats for the series have been sold two
weeks in advance of the opening con-
cert. He attributes the cause of the
early disposal of tickets to the fact
that the program is the finest ever
offered by the Choral Union.
It was previously 'announced that
a sale would be held this morning to
dispose of all remaining seats, but
the early exhaustion of the tickets
will make this sale unnecessary.4

GAME WILL MARK iEDICAT(
OF BIG COMMODORE
STADIUM
STRONG FIGHT LOOKED
FOR FROM SOUTHERNER,
Goebel and Uteritz Will Get Into A
tion; Few Substitutions
Expected
When Michigan and Vanderbilt li
up for the opening kickoff at 2:30 ti
afternoon at Dudley Stadium it w
mark the resumption of hostilities
the gridiron "which have been s
pended since 1914.
Today's battle, in addition to bei
a revival of old relations, also mar
the biggest day in Vanderbilt's at
letic history, the dedication of b
new stadium, built to accomodate 2
000 spectators, it is generally at
nowledged to be the finest athle
plant south of the Mason-Dixon Ili
It has been named in honor of
William L. Dudley, founder of V
derbilt's athletic system and for yes
head of the Southern Intercoleg
athletic association, There wll
elaborate dedication ceremonies
which members of the two teams w
take part, but it will be the game t
will attract all interest, the game
which Vanderbilt has been looki
forward since last spring.
Pupil vs. Master
The third feature of this aft
noon's meeting is the family inter
furnished by the two coaches, Fie
ing H. Yost, and his brother-in-la
Dan McGugin, of Vanderbilt. It
a good many years ago .that .McGu
and Yost first met;-1899. to be ext
-and on the day of the meeti
Yost's Kansas eleven defeated I
Iowa; team on which McGugin f v
playing guard. T o years later wb
'Yost came to Michigan to coach, '\
Gugin folowed him and played his l
two years of football here, establ
ing a reputation during that ti:
which caused Yost tq pick him foi
guard position on his mythical a
time Michigan eleven.
It is a peculiar conincidence tli
the last game between the two team
played 'on Ferry field Oct- 11, 19
was the occasion of the opening of I
new south stand which had just be
completed. It was not the dedicati
game but the stand was used for I
first time that day.
Michigan had little trouble defe
ing the Commodores in that last e
gagement between the two eleve
McGugan came to Ferry field t
year with a team of veterans w
Yost on the other hand, had but fo
men who had ever played in a Vars
lame before. Pouring rain all 'du
ing the game, seven green men opp
ed to 11 veterans, and the fact tf
there were five important games
follow on the. schedule did not hi
the Yost men back that day. By v
tue of Maulbetsch's terrific plungi
Catlett's open field running and Lai
Splaw's phenomenal kicking,
Maize and Blue was returned vict
ious by a 23 to 3 count.
Michigan Undefeated
Today will witness the eigl
meeting of the two elevens. In f
seven previous encounters Michi
has taken the heavy end of the sc
on every occasion piling up a total
125 points ascompared to 23 for
southerners. The Commodores h
never been conpletely outclas
when the final whistle blew, have
ways been in the running 'until
last minute, and on one occasi
1911, came within one point of effe
ing a tie with Yost's pupils, the 'f:
score being 9-8.
Conditions that featured the 1
battle here will prevail today in 1
Vanderbilt will have a veteran elev
picked from 21 letter men who
turned to school this fall. Yost h
ever will not be handicapped by
many green men as were in his 11
up in the last meeting between
two teams as he will have a vete:
Sbackfield,a pair o seasoned ends a
one experienced tackle when

teams face each other this afterno
Hard end running and a clever a
varied aerial attack are the weap<
which make the Varsity backfield c
to- be feared by any opponent. M
of, the Vanderbilt attack is said to
started from a run, pass, or kick I
mation which none of her oppone
this fall have solved.
Unless Yost has taught his char
how to meet a pass attack since
terrible exhibition of this style
play they put in the Case game I
Gugin's men are apt to pull someth
this afternoon that will be a shockA
'the campus.
Reece is Vanderbilt Star
P Rppea i h har dof ,',1' +ho

Southern Football Experts See
Easy Triumph For Wolverines

(By Daily Correspondent)
Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 13.Vander-
bilt's new Dudley stadium will have
an inauspicious dedication here to-
morrow, if the local football experts
whether they be of Vanderbilt or
Michigan extraction are to be consid-
ered capable judges. They can pre-
dict nothing but an easy Wolverine
victory, after watching the two teams
practice this afternoon.
The Michigan team showed no ill-
effects from the long trip and went
through a snappy practice in the aft-
ernoon. Their drill looked far bet-
ter than did that of the Commodores,

Goebel was doing some fine place
kicking, and the splendid exhibitions
of these two leaders apparently fired
the rest of the team into a fiery sig-,
nal practice.
Coach Yost this afternoon decided to
change his line-up for tomorrow's en-
counter. This means that Slaughter
will play center, with Blott shifted to
guard and Steele playing the other
guard. The rest of the line-up will be
the same that he announced earlier.
The entire football squad is in ex-
cellent condition, according to Train-
er Archie Hahn. It is his hope that
this will bring the team through to-
morrow's games without serious in-

MAURIEL HEADS IL
CIRCOLO ITALIANO
Election of officers for the ensuing
year took place at a recent meeting
of I1 Circolo Italiano. John J" Maur-
iel, '24, was chosen president of the
club, E. L. Gaspari, '24, vice president,
and Victoria Wordelman, '23, secre-
tary. Dorothy Scholl, '24, was elected
to act with the officers on the execu-
tiv'e committee.
Following the custom of the lang-
uage clubs in preceding yearsI1 Cir-
cola Italiano will inaugurate a series
of illustrated lectures as a part of
the club's activities for the year.
An -opening meeting -of -the -society
will be held the latter part of next
week at which all persons interested
in the studyof Italian are invited to
be present. Regular meetings of the
club will be held at 8:00 o'clock ev-
ery other Wednesday during the year.
The Daily's special corre-
spondent at Nashville late last
night wired that the game will
begin at 2:15 o'clock Central
I timr 3:r 15~ Ann Arbor time.I

TA ETA PI DELEGATES
SEE ,FORD MOTOR PLANT,
DISCUSSION AND APPOINTMENTS
MARK SECOND BUSINESS
SESSION.
General discussions and conumittee.
appointments took up the time of the
second business session of the Tau
Beta Pi convention held at the Union
yesterday morning. No vote was tak-
en on any of the propositions put be-
fore the assembly.
At one o'clock the delegates left
for Detroit where the afternoon was
spent inspecting the Ford Motor com-
pany's Highland Park plant, and the
General Motors building. This was
followed by a dinner and theatre par-
ty in the evening.
A business session is scheduled for
9 o'clock this morning and it is prob-
able that the great amount of busi-
ness which must be attended to will
necessitate an afternoon meeting. The
three day convention will come to a
close with the annual convention din-
ner to be given in the Union assembly
hall at 6:30 o'clock tonight. Prof.
Henry H. Higbie of the electrical en-
gineering department will deliver the
principal address.
First Tryouts For
Players' Club Held
First tryouts for positions in the
cast of the initial play of the year toi
be given by the Players club, were
held yesterday. afternoon between - 1
and 3:30. o'clock. in . .the Players'
workshop, at the old fire hall on East
University avenue. Fifteen members
were present.
The play to be given by the club
is ."The Roadhouse in Arden," by
Moeller. A reading, "The Swan
Song," by Tchekoff, will also be given.
These performances will take place
on Nov. 9 in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.

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