100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 13, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



[AL NEWSPAPER OF THE
(ERSITY OF MICHIGAN
every morning except Monday,
University year by the Board in
Student Publications.

have proved to be something more,
substantialthan mere entertainment
for upperclassmen. t

Aseiber of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Pres is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all.
news dispatches credited' to it or not other-'
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein,
7hn'ere3 at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class iatter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.-
Offies: Ann Abor. Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phgnes: iditorial, 2414 and 176-M ; Busi-
ness, q6o.
Conmunications not to exceed r3 words
if signed, the signature not nuecessarily to
appear iui print, but as an evidence of faith,
and iotices of events wNill be published in
The Daily at thediscretion of the bEditor, if
left at, or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Tehlphones, 2414 and 176-X

MANAGING EDITOR
MARION"'B. STAHL

City Editor ... James B. Young
Assistant City Editor..........Marion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman.....E R. Meiss
Night Editorss
Ralph Byers Harry Hoey
J. P. Dawson, Jr. J. E. Mack
L .f 1Prshdorfer R. C. Moriarty
II. A. Donahue
Sports Editor.. ..........F. H. McPixe
SundayMagazine Editor..... .Delbert Clark
Woe's ditor-------.....-Marion Koch
Humor Editor.............Donald Coney
Conference 'Editor . ....H .'.B. Grundy
Pictorial Editor..............Robert Tarr
Music Editor ...................H. Ailes
Assistants

M. H. Pryor
Dorothy, Bennetts
Maurice ca man
R. A. Billington
W. B. Butle!r
11. C. Clark
A. P. (Connabl
Evelyn T. Coughlin
Eugere Carmichael
Bernadette Cote
Wal"ace F. Elliott
1F't . Disko
Mnaxwecll Fcad

John Garlinvhouse
Isabel Fisher
Winona A. Hibbard
Samuel Moore
'. G. McShane
W. 13. Rafferty
W. H. Stoneman
Virginia Tryon
P. M. Wagner
A. P. Webink
Franklin Dickian
Joseph) EIstein
J. W. Ruwitch

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960;
BUSINESS-MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising............John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising ... ......Edward V. Conlin-
Advertising ......... .Walter K. Scherer
Acconas ...............Laurence . .1avrot
Cir'culatiOnl.........David 3. M. Park
PublicationL............1. Beaumont Parks
Assistants

rownsend H. Wolfe
Kenneth Seick.
George Rc ckwood
Perry M. layden
Eugene 1. Dunne
%V-m. Grauhiclh, Jr.
John C. IIaskin
H1arvey E1. Reed
C. L.14Ptnamn
~. 1). A rmnantrout
If. W. Cooper
Wallace Flower
Edw. B. Riedle
11amrkl L. 11ae -

Alfred M. White
Win.D. Roesser
Allan S. Morton
James A. Dryer
Wm. -1. Good'
Clyde L. Hagerman
A. T-fartwell, Jr.
J. Blumenthal,
H'oward Hayden
. K. Kidder
Henry Freud
1 erbert P. Bostwick
1,. Pierce

ANOTHER CONFERENCE NOTCH
With the announcement that the
Western Conference authorities have
jAitinto effect the ruling that to be
eligible for Big Ten athletics a man
shall have carried, passed, and at the
same time be carrying a minimum of
14 hours per semester of regular
academic work aside from any courses
in physical education or other athletic
work% a refutation is offered to the
arguments often advanced against the
continuance of college athletics.
The enforcement of this rule has
two} very decided advantages-bene-
fits 'which will do much to alleviate
th& so-called evils of college sports.
It will tend to place the main em-
phasis of an athlete's college career'
more upon his academic work than
upon his sporting activities.. Athletics
il still hold a place of prominence,
but what should be, the main pur-
pose of any man's attendance at a
university-that of securing an edu-
cation-will necessarily take prece-
dence over his gridiron or diamond
ambitions.
Again the rule will have the effect
of keeping out of the Big Ten uni-
versities those men who would go
to college with the sole purpose of
engaging in some branch of sport, in-
tending to neglect almost 4entirely
their academic duties. The Cofer-
ence authorities should be compli-
mknted for putting this regulation
into effect, for it will be of notice-
able aid in stamping out the unde-
sirabl'e elemsents from college ath-
letics.
THE MORAL PICTURE
One of the commonest dodges of
present day motion picture produc
ers is that of basing their plots on
what might be termed the degener-
acy of the youth of today. The ap-
peal of such offerings as "Nice Peo-
ple" and "Manslaughter" evidently
come primarily from public interest
in the decadence of the younger gen-
eration, for such scenarios claim to re-
flect not only the frivolities of the
jazz age, but the attitude of mind
behind them as well.
The producer, however, in his at-
tempt to make his picture effective,
has overstepped the mark. The
young people he presents are not the
young people one meets in every day
life. They are. gilded youth, and be-
ing glided youth, they are in no way
typical of the mass. If such produc-
tions are to be convincing, if they
are to prove to us to our satisfaction
that the rising generation as a whole
is hurling itself to destruction, they
must deal more intimately wh the
typical.-'
Granting that motion pictures, to
be successful, must gain their effect
from the pictorial, the spectacular,
the sensational, it is still a charge
worthy of consideration against them
that they are trying to prove a the-
sis by mere illustration, and by an
illustration which does not hold.
And if they are trying to prove no
thesis, if they are using their theme
merely as a vehicle to carry the
splendors of the scenes they employ,
they are to be the more condemned
for insincerity.
INDIVIDUALITY
Many 'a man stranded on a desert
isle has gone mad from the sheer
monotony of the thing. Likewise, it
has been said that a venerable philos-
opher took his life because he had
exhausted the resources of the why
and wherefore, and there was noth-

ing new under the sun. All of which
goes to prove the necessity of some-
thing different.
Just as no two blades of grass are
alike, so also no two members of.
the genus mankind are exactly the
same, and the degree of difference is
more noticeable in man because of
his larger size. This variety is truly
the spice of life, even the redeeming
factor of living.
The only reason in the world why
we are interested in anyone else is
because he is different from us, and
yet there are people who ever mask
their 'individuality behind the cloak
of affectation in an effort to imitate
others. The only thing that may be
said in favor of such persons is that
they deserve praise for their perse-
verance in so hard a task.
Those who imitate rarely overcome
the awkwardness accompanying con-
seious action and rarely reach the
ease 'of the imitated; but if there is
one thing in which every person can
excell it is the grace that accompan-
ies the exhibiting of one's own indi-
viduality.
As a final resort a good jazz or-
chestra could be placed on the job in
the room where a class meeting has
been scheduled.

EROLLS
ROLL THE FUR
COATS OUT OF
THE MOTHBALLS
COiMDIUNICATONt
C.N., '24E, is right about tra-s
ditions, isn't he, Caligula? If '98b
and '06 can make traditions,1
why not '24E, '25W and '26 S ofs
M. do it also? Men of Michi-.a
gan, it's an outrage that we have
been neglecting the tradition in-
dustry. Let us all make at leastt
two every month. My suggestion d
is this: let '24E make them for I
November because one of that
class suggested it, then let eacha
class fall in line, and inside ofc
two years we will have a greatera
and better Michigan. In fact it
will require a battalion of StateU
Police to enforce all the tradi-
tions. The Daily could have a spe-
cial departmental bulletin to re-..
mind the students of the tradi-
tions to be observed day by day.
Yours for traditions and lots a
of them,
BARON COGNAC, '26C. z
* * .*
A. B. C. ANY (STAIRWAY
If, when the siren tears the air, "
You have a class in 402,t
Just stay for fifteen seconds there
And ponder over what to do.
Don't plunge downstairs, you'd meet1
the fae2
Prepared of old for fools and asses;1
The lowest hallway will. be jani'med
With folks from seven other classes.I
Make up your mind: "I'll take my
time,
Thedemon Panic shall not get me,
I will descend with dignity
tAs fast as other folks will let me."
Thecorner will view your clinker
Unless you choose to use your
thinker.
S. BESTOS.
* * *
I his is a graph of De Joisey Bold
and Caligula searching, searching
for the inlssing MSS. They cut
classes right and left and, ;!fting
a ford from the State street nu-s-
ery, sped hither and john over the
terminal moraines of Annarbor,
Reading from right to left aiid back
again, lDe Jelsey Bold, Cal, De Joi-
soy Roid.'
Lissp bimbo-J'; DI43 Joisey Boids
lost two valyubil manyuskripts on
the campus dey ws his best Woiks of
Art Dey was on typeritin paper and
looked like poems If ya seen dese
manyukripts or seen somewun which.
has plees see as how deys braught
up to de Daily offis and left on the
Toasted Rolls hook 111 be ever so
much ablijed to yez all espeshilly if
yer from Joisey
Teeringly yores
DE JOISEY BOID.

THE WORLD IS OUR MARKET
(The Detroit News)
Michigan experts are again giving
thought to the disposition of the
state's great fruit crop. Thousands of
bushels of apples, pears, peaches,
plums and other fruits for which the
state is famous, spoiled in the orch-
ards for lack of a market.
President Fi-iday of the Michigan
Agricultural college has suggested
that western Michigan fruit interests
devote attention to perfecting through
co-operation, a system of marketing
which will involve the best obtain-
able facilities for refrigeration and
cold storage. Others have suggested'
a widening of the educational cam-
paign to induce Michigan residents to
use more of Michigan's own products.
These suggestions are good ones.
But is there not something more? Is
not Michigan justified in considering
and solving its fruit-marketing prob-
lems on a world basis? The climate
and soil of te state produce apples
and peaches which are without supe-
riors in flavor 'nud in preservative
qualities. The state should not con-
sider its marketing problem from the
standpoint of its limitations, but from
the view of its broadness.
One of the most alert and progres-
sive countries in South America,
Chile, has been conducting an ex-
periment from which Michigan can
learn much to her advantage. Chile
lies in the temperate zone, and her
climate and soil produce fruits simi-
lar to those of Michigan. In years!
of surplus yields Chileans, too, have
been forced to watch fine apples,
peaches, pears and plums spoil on the
trees.'
Chile's fruit crop ripens in Febru-
ary, March and April, just the period
of the year when the fruit kept in
cellars in the north temperate zone
becoires exhaustedti Chilens con-
cluded their logical market for sur-
plus fruit, if the problem of trans-
portation and refrigeration could be
solved, was in North America. They
conceived the idea that North Amer-
icans would be eager to seek in turn
the out-of- season market of Chile.
As an experiment, Chileans bought
last year in the United States a car-
go of various kinds of temperate zone
fruits. They took them to Chile and
found that the refrigerators on board
kept the fruit in good condition. Last
winter - our winter - ,the Chileans
worked the experiment the other
way, chartering a vessel and sending
40,000 cases of apples, peaches and
similar fruits north, through the Pan-
ama Canal to New York City, where
they disposed of them. There was no
attempt to make money on either ven-
tur4T, it being an experiment to learn
whether the fruit would arrive in good
condition.
The Chileans reached the conclu-
sion that inter-continental trade can
be conducted profitably. Their study of
freight rates and other elements con-
vinced them that they could sell, at
any point in the Unied States east of
the Mississippi river, fruits in the late
winter and spring at a price within
easy reach.
Michigan might meet a part of her
problem with simlar thought, Argen-
tina, Brazil, Uraguay, Paraguay and
Chile are countries wholly or in part
in the south temperate zone, and
should be willing to consider recipro-
cal marketing opportunities. Michigan
must deal with her marketing problem
as one in which the whole world of-
fers the field for cultivation. Virginia
has learned this. Certain orchards
there send their entire crop regularly
to Europe.
STHE MUCH MALIGNED PROFESSOR

(The Daily Illini)
Conventional characters are num-
erous in this world, and the college
professor still holds an exalted place
among them. Unfortunately, how-
ever, there is a mistaken idea which
exists in the university that profes-
'sors are merely creatures-mechani-
cal beings-who are here for the sole
purpose of reciting facts for students
to note.
The average lecture in any course
on the university schedule is a place
where students go to sleep, talk, or
jot down a few notes and get out as
soon as posible. Abolutely no at-
tention is paid to the professor who is
lecturing after the bell has rung for
the end of the hour, and very little
respect is given him.
Perhaps the spirit expressed in this
way is not intentional, but the least
'students can do is correct this spirit if
it is not meant. If it is intentional,
on the other hand the students still
hold that opinion of the high school or
grade school pupil which brands the
instructor as some enemy, eager te
contest on any point, and this ex-
pression is certainly not one of a real
university student.
Professors are human; they are
willing to co-operate with the stu-
dents in every way; they deserve the
support of the entire student body.

MICHIGAN

EDITORIAL COMMENT

:-i A T

BOTH STORES

f.

Corduroy Coats $6.50 up.
Co.-Adv.

Wild and 1

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oc
am., 7:00 a m., 8:oo a.m,, 9:o5 a.m. and
hourly to 9:~o5 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m., and every two hours
to 9 :47 p.mn.
Local Cars East Bound-7:oo a.m. and ev-
ery two hours to 9 :oo p.m., ii :oo p.m. To
Ypsilanti only--i: :4o p.m., r .i5 a.m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a.m., rz:io
p. in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo - Limited cars
8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47,.4:47 p.M.

I

WAI

I I
* I

If You Like to Give
or Receive-

n e

you will be glad to learn
of the arrival of hun-
dreds of them, in a wide-
lyassorted variety of
of exquisite shades and
e x o t i c fragrances at-

I

LAST EDITION

To Jackson
p.m.

and Lansing-Limited at 8:471

1922
S
1
8
15
22
29

OCTOBER
M T W T
2 3 4 5
9 10 11 12
16 17 18 19
23 24 25 26
30 31

F
6
13
20
27

1922
S
14
21
28

Start Right With a Good ,Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When
you want a hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned ins'de out
with all new strimmings are like new.
We also make and sell POPULAR
PRICE and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar or more on a hat. We give
values and quote prices which cannot
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere
else. Try us for your next hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R. Stoos at State Street)
ADRIAN - ANN ARBOR
BUS LINE
Leaving Hours From Ann Arbor
Central Standard Time
X D S,
8:45 A.M.
4:40 P.M. 12:45 P.M. 6:45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. H. ELLIOTT PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-M
The Official
CLASS TOQUES
We have a better toque
WAGLYR&OMPAHY
,forMen cc-Since 1948
DR. W. S. MILLS
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
616 First Nat'l Bk. Bldg.
Office Hours Phone
9-12; 1:30-5 321-F1

6.p J

225 East Liberty Phone 1821

PAWNW-
wvw

1

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1922

6.

!,_!

New Sports Coats
$25 to $59.50

SONG

BOO

MIS- dmw

*

. .
w ,r
°,
r
..

Night Editor-JOHN P. DAWSON, JR.
FRESHWATER
The writer of a communicationr
printed yesterday in The Daily sug-
gests that the present traditional
rules" for freshmen be supplemen-
ed by new regulations in order to in-
sure the fact that first year men real-
ize the humility of their position, and
also to afford some fun tothe older
men of the University. Among the
new restrictions suggested are the
enforced wearing of a red necktie
outside the coat, the banning of
knickers, and the prohibiting of cigar
smoking on the campus among fresh-
men.
In the same issue The Daily at-
tempted to set forth editorially, under
the heading "Start tonight, '26",
something of the meaning and pur-
pose of the rules governing the first
year students.
The main requirement, the wearing
of the gray cap, is not made in or,
der 'to humiliate freshmen. Rather,
its purpose is to distinguish the class,
in order that the members may rec-
ognize each other and gradually cul-
tivate a class feeling and class inti-
macy. Deference to upperclassmen
of the University, the other main fac-
tor in the so-called discipline, is in-
tisted upon because it is felt that the
new men owe some consideration and
respect to the older members of the
student body. One could hardly say
that either of these traditions is par-
ticularly "humorous to the old" ones
at Michigan. They merely persist be-
cause it is felt that such restrictions
are of some- benefit to the freshman
class.
In what is known as the "freshwa-
ter colleges" the wearing of red neck-
ties may be quite the thing for fresh-
men. And the rest of the students
may think it not unusual to build bon-
fires in the city streets, have snake
dances which end in the burning in
effigy of some overly-exacting profes-
sor, or paint up the statue on the town
hall steps.
But Michigan hats outgrown that
stage of university childhood. Her

Mannish

in line; easy to

slip intoc

and out of snug

and warm. Some have huge
collars of fur. Numerous colors
GooUdyearTs
124 SOUTH MAIN

* * *

WE NEVER really felt quite like a
Soph before-
But yesterday a Freshman made us
feel like three or four.
We were wending through the cam-
pus
Thinking thoughts unto ourself-
We reached an intersection, and
Oh well, he stopped and let us go
by. We cant rime the damn
thing,
But we're no end proud of it just the
same. urch.
* * *
"Seen 'Manslaughter'?"........
"Yeah! Say that boy sure can tac-
kle!"
* * *
The other day we saw a collich
man on the campus with the collar of
his top-coat upturned in the true col-
legiate style.
* * *

Candy Day Sat., October 1.4

4

MAKE THEM HAPPIER

4

Send Them a Box
We will deliver it for you

of Betsy

Ross Chocolates

And
kindly
him.
And
gaged

one of our middle-aged and
young instructors came up to,
* 4' * ,
knowing the collich man, en-
him in friendly conversation.
* * *

We will make itfor you

Y

And in the course of the conver-
sation he unconsciously turned down
the upstanding and collegiate coat
collar.
And that just about puts the kind-
ly instructor in a class with the coat-
room girl who re-blocks a man's hat
before returning it.
* * *
Doesn't it?
CALIGULA,
Freshmen Win Tug At Columbia
For the second year in succession
the annual tug-of-war victory was an-
nexed by a freshman class when '26
won the "tugp" in two stra ight heats'

Cool Weather Creates a Demand for
Something Warm

Hot Chocolate
Hot Malted Milk
Hot Lemonade

Hot Fudge Cream Puffs
Hot Fudge Sundaes

Home-made Apple and
Peach Pie a la mode right
out of the hot oven

At Our Fountain Every Day
BETSY. ROSS SHO-P

There are so many moustaches pa-

Hold Trial-, for Prinrt-on Onera I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan