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October 12, 1922 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ih Dib I ti BULL
:FFEGTIYE IN 1923

in Ann Arbor this fall and will be en-
tertained by the club during his stay
here. It is also expected that Mr. Mas-
selink, vice president of the Ferris in-
stitute, will be entertained here some
time this fall.
All former Ferris Institute members
are requested to get in touch with the
secretary of the organization immedi-
ately.

Michigan Meln Will Not Be Barred
This Fall By Recent Law
On Eligibility
ALL ATHLETES MUST CARRY
14 HOURS OF ACADEMIC WORK
"No man on Michigan's teams will'
be affected this fall by the new Con-
ference ruling on eligibility require-
ments," was the statement given out
yesterday by Coach Fielding H. Yost
in regard to the query raised as to
just what effect the ruling might have
on Varsity athletics.
Prof. Ralph W. Aglr, of the Law
School and chairman of the Board in
Control of Athletes first presented
the ruling ii his regular report before
the Senate council at its meeting last
Monday. The requirements state that
to be eligible for Conference athlet-'
ies a man shall have carried, passed,
and be at ,the same time carrying a
minimum of 14 hours per semester of
regular academic work aside from any
courses in physical education or other
athletic work that he may be taking.
In Force Next Semester
This ruling will not go into effect
until next semester so any man now
eligible to play or who is playing on
Varsity teams is allowed to do so tin-
der these requirements.
In speaking of the new ruling Coach
Yost said, "Although the ruling is re-
troactive, it will not affect students of
physical education of last year. It
will, however, govern the future of
athletics and physical education stu-
dents who are participating in ath-
letics. Formerly, under the old ruling,
they were , only required to take 12
hours of academic work while now
they must carry 14 hours besides
their other' work.
Speedball
Speedball proved itself worthy of
the name yesterday afternoon when
five hard-fought contests in the inter-
fraternity tournamnent were plaayed. In
spite of the cold and rainy weather
only one of the six games scheduled
for the afternoon was forfeited on ac-
count of non-appearance of one of the
teams. Every minute of play was full
of speed and excitement and no large
scores were run up by any one team.
Lack of skill was in ' evidence
throughout the contests but because
of the absence of any one star on
any team the scores were even in
every case. The most interesting and
hard fought contest of the afternoon
was staged when the Phi Delta Theta
team met the Phi Sigma Delta eleven.
During the first half the former team
managed to pile up 8 points, but dur-
ing the last period the losers came
from behind, piling up 5 points before
the final whistle stopped them.
In the Alpha Delta Phi-Chi Psi
game, the former team made its first
score on a goal from kickoff, finally
winning a bitter contest by a 5 to 0
score. The largest score of the after-
noon was run up by the Phi Sigma
Kappas' in their game with Beta The-
ta Pi. Against seemingly overwhelm-
ing odds of weight and speed they won
by sheer steadiness of play, winning
by a 15 to 5 score.
Final results were as follows:
Alpha Delta Phi 5, Chi Psi 0; Phi
Delta Theta 8, Phi Sigma Delta, 5;
Nu. Sigma Nu 7, Phi Mu Alpha 2; Tri-
gon 8, Theta Delta Chi 6; Phi Kappa
Sigma 15, Beta Theta Pi 5; Acacia
forfeited to Phi Sigma Kappa.
FERRIS INSTITUTE ELECTS
M E SOFFICERS FOR NEW YEAR
Officers were elected and plans com-
posed for the coming year at a meet-
ing of the University of Michigan Fer-
ris institute held Tuesrlay in Uni-
versity hall. Adolph E Bigge, '24, was
elected president for the year, Herbert
F. Schiefer, '24E, vice president, John
W. Denton, secretary, and Daniel M.
Voss, treasurer.
Mr. Ferris, Democratic candidate for
the United States senate, will speak

HEALTH LECTURES
I PLANNED FOR YEAR
The joint committee on public health,
composed of representatives from the
state medical society, the state dental
society, the state department of health
and the university, met at 'the Union
Monday afternoon and arranged a ser-
ies of lectures for the coming year.
'The state medical society was rep-
resented by Drs. W. J. Kay, Alpena; F.
S. Warnshuis and W. G. Dubois, Grand
Rapids; W. T. Dodge, Big Rapids; A.
P. Biddle and G. E. Frothingham of
Detroit. Dr. Richard Olin represented
the .Michigan department of health.
The university was represented by
President Marion L. Burton, Dean
Hugh Cabot, Dr. G. Carl Huber, Dr.
John Sundwell and Prof. W. D. Hen-
,derson. Dean W. H. McCr'acken of the
Detroit College of Medicine and Sur-
gery was also present.
It was decided that hereafter Dr.
William H. Elliott of Detroit will rep-
resent the state dental society, and
that Dr. Storey of Detroit represent-
ing the Wayne county medicinal so-
ciety will sit with the joint commit-
tee.
Prof. Henderson stated that 25 lec-
turers had been assigned this winter
in the campaign to make public health
educationi an open book in every house-
hold throughout the state. The Wayne
county society will work with the
joint committee in arranging the lec-
ture program.
Dr. Olin told the gathering of the
"Health Weeks" his department is con-
ducting. The next meeting will be held
on Jan. 16, 1923, at the Michigan un-
ion.
FRESHMEN FEATURE IN
FIRST CRIME ISSUE
(Continued from Page One)
"Fight 'Em" article is live with spir-
it, live with memories of. great deeds
of the gridiron, written by men who
knot.'
Fiction Fair
The fiction in this issue is fair. Of
"The Four Leaf Clover" it can only
be said that it in no way measures up
to some of the author's other stor-
ies which appeared in Chimes. Hoov-
er's writing, however, shows promise
-there are evidences of thought in it.
''Fortitude" by Marjorie Kerr is clev-
erly done, and smacks encouragingly
of 0. Henry, while Coney's "The Curse
.of the Leffingwells"' begins with a
bright touch of humor but ends in
a splurge of pathos. Perchance 'twas
so intended. There are several poems
in this issue-one a fable with an in-
visible moral. G: D. E.'s book reviews
are frankly critical. His writings
should prove a potent circulation
booster for Chimes. (For reference

consult H. L. Meneken, care of Smart
Se".)
The October Chimes, taken as a
whole, is good-it is well worth read-
ing.
ACOSTA, AIR PILOT, BARRED
FROM MT. CLEMENS RACES
Mt. Clements, Oct. 10.-Bert Acosta,
widely known airplane pilot, has been
barred from participation as a naval
pilot, in the Pulitzer race to be held
ate Selfridge field Saturday, it was an-
nounced tonight. Acosta had planned
to fly a navy Bee-line racer, his entry
being made possible by a special com-
mission. This plan, however, brought
the objection that such a course might
be ,construed as a reflection on the
ability of the regular naval pilots, and
an order came from the navy depart-
ment that the Bee-line racer be driven
by a regular officer.
Have you signed up yet for your
Varsity blotter?

Players' Club Tryouts to Be Friday
Tryouts for positions in the cast of
the first play to be presented by the
Players' club 'will take place Friday
afternoon from 1 to 3 o'clock, when all
members wishing to try out for posi-
tions are asked to be present. Many
new members have joined the Players'
club this fall and officials expect a
more successful year than ever before.
FALL SPORTS
or indulge in any
athletic sport,
Spalding impements
give most satisfaction.
If It's Spalding's
It's Right
Send for Catalogue
211 So. State St., Chicago, Ill.

Corduroy Coats $6.50 up. Wild and
Co.-Adv.
RIDER'S PEN SHOP
For Expert
Pen Repairing

Lose something? A classified in
the Daily will find it.-Adv.
SHUSERT Nights 50.75.S1.00
MI CH IG AN P.: -ates'. :
Opposite CadillaoHotel Main'770
TH E BONSTELL E CO.
Presents the Virile Drama of the Northwest
"TIGER ROSE "
As played by LNORE ULRIC
NEfXT WFUM--"HAPPY-GO-LUCKY"

308 So6 State
2I-HOUR SERVICE -

St.
FAIR PRICES

GARRICK "M...0t
Sat. Mat. Sse to$
ARTHUR HOPKINS Presents
Eugeoc O'Neill's Great Success
STIDE HAIRY APE
tA Symbolic Comedy of Ancient and Mo,
Life with LOUIS WOLHeRIM
Next Week-"JUST MARRIED"

..l
5
.
t

404
fi*

alt Ms
Jr~i*

Lpeseone- ,,g -So

Designed iy
WHITEHOUSE & HARDY
wNoRoot AtE~D:.
BROADWAY AT 40" STREET 144 WEST 42"w STREET
METRmoPouTrOA liounoksasBD, KNICKERBOCKER BUILDING,
NEW YORK

often Cheoniy tes
why it's so umpt lrtait
they be good oles.
Yoi may 4ah~
gold, but f kvR-
thie lsuggeats mdicrzty
would Close th De1ill
often be denied you.
Good'clothes don't me
display-they raea .thy,
wearer has commaikiisense

__

The first impressIon of
Society Brand is like
the, second and all
ot~aers - because they
an fauIltes.

~~

i s

PAY your, bills by

Wadhams & Co.

check

is our advice.

TWO STORES

STATE

It's backed by

ST.

MAIN ST.

a ser-

vice that hundreds of
students are using daily

r
a ,.

k
TiCkets

Exhausted

AR C
COMING

AD
SUNDAY

F

STATE

SAVINGS BANK

for

Main at Washington

I

Choral

U nion

S

I

i

Orders have been received in such large numbers that the Main Floor, the First Balcony
and the front half of the Second Balcony have been sold, out. A limited number of seats in the
Second Balcony remain at $4.50 and $5.00 each. These may be ordered so long as they last.
If any still remain, they will be offered to the general public at the School of Music, SATUR-
DAY, OCTOBER 14.

Special this noon,

evening:

Chicken Pot Pie

_ "-' ?_

FOR THE

I

Only 25c!

i

FOR STUDENTS
HURON STREET TAXI.
D5DAY OR NIGHT
25c 207 N. Main 25c

Extra Concert Series

+.

VIRTUALLY an entire
meal for 25c! Each serv-
ice includes two light, fluffy
biscuit of generous size lost
in a dressing of tender chick-
en and rich gravy. Special
for luncheon and dinner to-
day - as long as it lasts.

Good tickets remain on all floors as follows: Main Floor,
$4.00 and $5.00; Second Balcony, $2.00 and $3.00. Mail or

$4.00 and $5.00; First Balcony,
ders will be selected in the order

of receipt.

-F'

In this series five stupendous programs will be offered:

Det.t

Alfred Cortot, "A Second Paderewski" in a piano recital, December 4.
Ina Bourskaya, Rssia n Coloratura Soprano, soloist with the Detroit Orchestra, under
Maurice Dumesnil, French Pianist, soloist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, under
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, February 19.

an t Return

i

Via

Raoul Vidas,

French Violinist, soloist with Detroit Symphony Orchestra, In a Popular Program,
under VICTOR KOLAR, November 20.

I

cHI AN
"The Niagara Falls Route"

I

Kathryn Meisle,

American Contralto, soloist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, In a Popular
Pre grame, under VICTOR KOLAR,.January 15.

!I

Michigan
n r I

Tickets on sale daily with return

Address orders ,to

I

I

I

I

Address orders to

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