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October 12, 1922 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-12

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,:.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en.
titled to the use for republicatiot of all
news dispatches credited to it or not other-
wi;;e credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.
intereA at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
;Subscription by carrier or mail, $3,50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and r76-M; Busi-
ness, o6o.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
if signedi, the signature not necessarily to
appear in priit, but as an evidence of faith,
and riot iscs of events will be, published "in
The Daily at the discretion of the ditor, if
left at or mailed to The Daily office. - Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
toness the writer encloses postage. The Daily
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-M

MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL

Ciy Editor...............James R. Young
Assistant City Editor.......Marion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman ......E. R. Meiss
Night Editors-- .
Ralph Byers llarry 'Hoey
J. P. Dawson, Jr. J. E. Mack
L. T. Hrshdorfer . C. Moriarty
H.11,A.Dona
Sports Editor..............F. H. McPixe
Sunday Magazine Editor......Delbert Clar
Wone's hdtor .:.......Marion Koch
Iumor Editor................Donald Coney
Conference ;%ditor............H. B. Grundy
Pictorial Editor................Robert Tarr
Music Editor..................E.H. Ailes
Assistants"
M. H. Pryer Tohln .Garlinhouse
Dorothy Lennetts Isabel Fisher
Maurice einan Winona A. Hibbard
R. A. iillington, Samuel Moore
W,' B. Butler T. G. McShane
11. C., Clark W. B. Rafferty
A. B. Connable W. H. Stoneman
Evelyn J. Coughlin Virginia Tryon
Eugene Carmichael P. M. Wagner
Bernadette Cote A. I Webbink
Wallace F. Elliott Fiankli Dickman
e. . Fiske Joseph Epstein
Maxwell Feal J. W. Ruwitch
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising ............John J. Ilamel, Jr.
Advertising................dward F. Conlin
Advertising.............Walter K. Scherer
Accounts..-.........Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation................David J. M. Park
Publication..............L. Bleaumont Parks
Assistants
Townsend H1. Wolfe Alfred M White
Kenneth seick Wi. D Roeser
George Rockwood Allan S. Morton
Perry M. Hayden James A. Dryer
Eugene L. Dnne Wi. 11. Good
W'n. Craulich, Jr. Clyde L. agerman
John C. iaskin A. Hlartwell, Jr.
Harvey' -. Reed J. Blumenthal
C. ,. Putnam Howard Hayden
E. D. Armantrout W. K. Kidderr
H. W. Cooper Henry Freud
Wallace Flower Herbert P. Bostwick
Edw. B. Riedle L. Pierce t
Harold-,I,, hale
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1922
Night Editor-HARRY D. HOEY
START TONIGHT, '26
Tonight is Traditions Night. To the
\freshmen assembled in Hill auditor-
ium a member of the faculty, students,
and an alumnus will talk upon the
subject of Michigan, upon the Uni-
versity which the first year men have
just entered, and about which they
are. desirous of learning. They will
be told of the traditions of Michigan
as a whole, of loyalty to Michigan, and
of pride in Michigan.
If the freshman class is to become
a worth while factor in the University
life, it must learn this lesson of mem-
bership in the entire institution. But
along with that lesson should go an-
other one almost equally as impor-
tant, the lesson of pride in one's own
class as integral part of the whole
Michigan.
Practically all the troubles of fresh-
men in the past have come from a
lack of class pride. Certain men have
looked with disdain upon their fellow
claiasmates. They have consdered
themselves. too good to be frehmen,
that it was beneath their dignity to'
abide by the rules governing their
class.°
The freshman class is but one stage
In the four years of existence at col-
lege, a period through which all those
who wish to be graduated must pass.
In the regular'order of events a class
enters the University together, and
later on passes from it together. If a
man is proud of his class as a junior
or senior, why is he not just as proud
of its as a freshman? The same men-
hers comprise it, the same strength
or weaknesses characterize it.
If this feeling is harbored by fresh-
men, the rules they are asked to
obey will cease to seem mere attempts
upon the hart of sophomores and up-
perclassmen to humiliate them. On
the other hand they will take on

their real significance as a means for
stamping students as first year men,
so that they may be thrown into each
other's company constantly, and form
associations which will carry their
class throughout the University as a

RETURN OF ROBERT FROST
The announcement of the renewal
of the fellowship which will enable
Robert Frost to return to Ann Arbor
for- another year may well create en-
thusiasm among the faculty and stu-
dent body. It indicates the success-
ful fullfilment of the primary pur-
pose for which he was brought to the
University, that of causing students
to think and to understand life
through the eyes of a poet.
Last year certain eastern cynics
mocked the idea of a poet's being
paid $5,000 a year for doing nothing.
But being placed in the anomalous
position of working according to his
own mental dictates, Robert Frost
found doing nothing a harder task
than he had bargained for, one that oft-
en required fourteen hours a day of his
time. He quickly became the nucleus
around which the intellectual life of
the campus was built, and students
profited by personal contact with
him.
But so many demands were placed
ution him by students and societies,
that he was unable to write a line of
poetry the entire year.
The fact should be remembered that
Robert Frost has been bestowed with
a scholarship by the University in or-
der that he may benefit by the influ-
ence of the campus surroundings as
well as because of the benefit which
the student body may derive from his
presence. For this reason, it might
P7e well this year to allow the poet a
little more time to devote to his
verse, the creation of which is after
all his highest and most useful pur-
pose in life.
COMMERCE CLUB
The contemplated expansion of the
Commerce club and the proposed
change in its organization is of inter-
est to the large and ever-increasing
number of students who are following
the study of business administration.
The Commerce club aims to keep
students in touch with the business
world through the practice of bring-
ing in from time to time prominent
business men to address the club. In
addition it endeavors to place grad-
uates of the business administration
course in desirable positions where
they will have every opportunity to
make good.
Some sort of formal connection with
commerce clubs in other cities is be-
ing considered.' Such a union would
no doubt increase the ability of the
club to help students in a material
way. Unlike other students in the
technical schools, commercial stu-
dents have little lnowledge before
graduation as to where they will
work or what sort of work they
will do. Many have difficulty in find-
ing jobs with promising futures.
If'ethe icommerce clubs of various
cities were united in the cause of
placing the best trained men in the
most responsible positions, the re-
sults would benefit both industry and
the students.
JUMPING SPACE
A liberal allowance Is no longer a
prerequisite to following the teani
on its trips around the country. The
installation of an electric football
score board in Hill auditorium will
enable all Michigan students to watch
every football game which is played
on foreign fields. The board is a
miniature football field. It reports
the game, play by play a few seconds
after each maneuver is completed on
the field.
The' value of the board lies in two
things, the number of people who can
witness the contest without leaving

town, and the ease and speed with
which the machine itself can be oper-
ated. The apparatus is electrically
controlled, and one man only is need-
ed to manage it. The dimensions of
the piece are eleven by fifteen feet.
The ball is shown in motion, and the
audience is informed by a systen of
lights of the play used, the man who
carried the ball, and the number of
yards gained.
By permitting a larger number of
people to -witness contests, much of
the false rumor that circulates on
such occasions will be precluded. The
campus will be brought into a closer
relation with the team, and a better
spirit will result. No doubt, the team
itself will be benefited by the closer
link with the student body when it is
away from home. Considerable ap-
preciation is due to, the alumni of
Michigan who have enabled her to
own such an ingenious device.
MATTY
A real athletic-hero who plays the
game on the square is not quickly
forgotten by the American public.
Christy Mathewson is perhaps the
greatest example of an athlete who
has commanded no end of admira-
tion, and whose praises are still
sung although he has 'not -played
baseball for several years.
There have been many excellent
pitchers who stand out in relief for
their athletic skill. But Mathewson
has remained the idol of idols among
baseball fans. They like his game-
+,C... 's .m ri 'ha i .ll -* than.

OASTED ROLL
MOECOLAY

p

Editor, The Michigan Daily.
Here on our campus, we find,

MIHI GAN

SO NG

BOOK

upon

THE BOOTLEGGER'S DAUGHTER
A Tragedy
Oh list to a bootlegger's daughter,
The most fair of a family of eight,
Who was raised on all hootch and no
water;
Oh list to the tale of my fate.
My, father made moonshine the
clearest
That has ever been seen near this
spot;
And I loved him and called him "my
dearest",
The law-breakin', keg-swillin' sot.
But I see men are not to be trusted,
And the thought of it's driving me
wild,
When I think what that bleary-eyed
cuss did
To his own girl-a bootlegger's child.
One night he brought out some new
moonshine,
At least that's what he said it was;
It was clean, like that stuff that you
wash in,
But I risked it and took a good
"guzz".
Now I'm only a bootlegger's daugh-
ter,
And there's not many things that I
know,
But I can tell whisky from water,
And that moonshine was plain H20.
So I fainted, what else could a girl do
On drinking a liquid like that?
And I thought of the depths that I'd
fell to.
Then again I fell, drunk as a bat.
A doctor was called, and for hours
To fix up my illness he tried,
But I didn't respond to his powers,

entering school, that a certain set of
traditions were laid down before us,
and because it is a "Michigan Tradi-
tion" of the past, we abide by it. The
men that started traditions were hu-
man, as we are now, and they thought

:.: A T -:

RA AMS'

up a lot of wise things to make the
incoming freshmen realize that he
has restriction. That's a good idea,
let's not let them think they are
"someone" so let's all combine and
make the class of '26 do as we did,
but in addition, why should a fresh-
man be allowed to wear "knickers" on
the campus? Why smoke cigars on
the campus? Why not make them
wear a red tie outside of their coat?
They would be more conspicuous
then and maybe they would realize
that they're only freshmen after all.
Suggestions to the Student council of
the above type.'ought to be appreciated
by them and acted upon. We don't
have to stick to past ideas entirely.
How about the. future freshmen, let's
make them stick to some of the things
we say. Hazing is of the past, we're
doing away with that, so let's get up
something new. It may be humiliat-
ing to the "green" ones but humorous
to the "old". Yours truly for better
"Michigan Men".
C. N., '24E.
EDITORIAL COMMENT

BOTH STORES

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Pastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oc
a.m., 7: o :a.n., 8:oo a.m., 9:o5 a.m. and
hour'ly to 9 :05 P.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arbor)--9:47 a.m., and every two hours
to 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7 :oo a.m. and ev-
cry two hours to 9:oo P.m., r aoo p.m. To
Ypsilanti only-z t :40 P.m., x1:15 a.mn.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m., I2:I0
To Jackson and Kalamazoo - Limited cars
8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12;47, 2:47, 4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at 8:47
P.mi.

ADRIAN - ANN ARBOR
BUS LINE
Leaving Hours From -Ann Arbor
Central Standard Time
X D S-
8:45, A.M.#
4:40 P.M. 12:45 P.M. 6:45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. H. ELLIOTT, PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-M

MILLER'S BARBER SHOP

Wm. A. Miiler, Prop.

- Motto --

Service and .Courtesy

"You knew me three
years at the Union"

1114 S. University Ave.
.--.-------.----....-..----- -- -- -

:

CAMPUS OPINION

LAST EDITION OF

1922
S
1
8
22
29

2
9
16
23
30

OCTOBER
T W T
3 4 5
10 11 12
17 18 19
24 25 26
31

F
6
13
20
27

1922
s
14
21
28

THE
GREY,
SHOP

A
I
Ai
w

nd before the day'd broken I died.
was buried soon after that hap-
pened,
nd since, I have tried to atone,
Vhile my father went back to his

cabin
Where he
alone.

solf all his moonshineC

So hark to the story I've told you.
And if it should cause you to think,
Remember, whate'er else you may do
That water is not meant to drink.
ANON.
Our Foreign Contributor Running tol
Snatch His Daily from
the Postman
y
Croswell, Mich.
Dear Editor:
Upon receiving The Daily I opened
it, at first, to the Telescope*-which
was not there! Surely the departure
of an old friend deserves some com-
memoration so I submit most hum-
bly-
"The Telescope will ope for me
Nevermore, ah! nevermore!
Our 'Erm' has departed unto dust
To laugh no more-nevermore.**
To him this grad now sadly sings.
The Toasted Rolls the Daily brings
Evermore-forevermore!" ***
The Gradastronomer.
* A former humor colyum.
** True, he now writes editorials.
*** Oh we hope not!
COMIIUNICATION
"Say Cal, whatindll's the matter
with my stuff? Is it pootrid?"
EKE.
And then the poor boy sobbed. But
don't take it so much to heart-
sometimes we just HAF to print con-
tribs in the Monday morning Daily.
* * *
POEM
It was his aim
To see "The Skin Game."
He now survives
A case of hives.
And we do claim
That that's what the innocent
bystander always gets! ;
One of Those Brilliant Damsels with
an Electric Personality with
Flaming Red Hair and A
Radiant Smile
. * .* *
WANTED-Girl to give light service
in exchange for room and board.
Phone 2009-J. -Our Own Daily.
* * *
The ivy is flaming beauty against
the gray side of U Hall.
* * *
Crisp Fall is creeping upon us.
* * *
Zut! How this heavy underwear
scratches!

POLITICAL VOLCANOES
(The Daily Cardinal)
From the misty recesses of yester-
day has ben resurrected an ancient
ordinance whose few terse sentences
bid fair to stir the campus to its
very depths. Within this long lost
legislation lies a germ that may grow
and expand to a magnitude which will
hold the college world spellbound.
The Student Senate has discovered
a ruling that upon petition a class
meeting may be called and that at that
meeting candidates may be required
to appear before their fellows and
orate. Once again Music hall may
reverberate with the plaudits of the
mob as a gifted speaker ends his plea
in a burst of oratorical fireworks.
Imagine, the far reaching results
of this political find. Who knows but
that history may be made; who knows
but that the famed Lincoln Douglas
debates may fade into oblivion be-
fore the blasting rays of a debate
between two aspirants to class pres-
idencies.
Picture a meeting in 165. An im-
patient restless mob, then the per-
suading, enthralling voice of a would
be Prom chairman, and the audience
becomes quiet, held by the speaker's
magic.
Suddenly a co-ed springs to her
feet, "Who are you going to take to
the Prom if you are elected?" she
demands. The candidate falteis; he
is not ready to meet that vital issue.
Bedlam breaks forth. He tries com-
promise, but it is too late, and with I
bowed head he leaves the platform,
a broken man.
Consider the spectacle of State
street, unromantic State street, blaze
up forth in the glory of a torch light
procession; for when political frenzy
is fired by the impassioned voice of
man, it knowsno bounds.
The magnitude of the picture is
thrilling. We wait, eager and expect-
ant, for the re-birth of political ora-
tory, which has so long been dead.
THE CANE RUSH
(The Ohio State Lantern)
When the crack of the gun Friday
afternoon opens the annual cane rush
between the freshmen and sophomores
both classes should have a full rep-
resentation of their men on the field.
This contest between the classes is
the only struggle in which everyone
can participate and supplants the old-
fashioned hazings of which one used
to hear so much, but which is rarely
seen in the present-day university.
For this r'eason every male member
of each class should -be present to
engage in the battle royal. Twenty
minutes of rough-and-tumble in old
clothes will harm no one, and after
the contest the man who took part
will have the feeling of satisfaction
that comes from knowing that he has
done what he could for his class.
The socalled class fightis harmless.
It affords amusement for the upper-
classmenwho throng the stands and
recall their scrimmages of recent
years. It entertains the downtown
folk, who always travel 'to Ohio field
to see the annual tussle.
Tradition is satisfied by the holding
of this annual battle-between the two
lower classes, which are supposed to
cherish bitter enmity toward each oth-
er. After the battle, the classes re-
sume their amicable relations which

Start Right 'With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS.
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
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We also make and sell POPULAR
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a dollar or more on a hat. We give
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FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.UJ.R. Stops at State Street)
EXCHANGE YOUR
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FOR A
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RIDER'S PEN SHOP
The Official
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regular customers. All who come are
more than satisfied with our delicious
home cooking. Try us once, youl
surely return.

The Grey Shop is open
ebery eA'ening nok'
until 10:30
Stop in after the sholv
for a "Rainbow
Spiecial"
Nunnally 's Southern
Candies

600 L. Liberty

FOR A MIDNIGHT LUNCH IN YOUR ROOM
make use of our night delivery service.

I

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OPEN TILL 12:30

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PHONE 15263

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