100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 12, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1£iA1 L. : Y 11 .'1&J f...DA.1.1 ,

LLLU I lilU UIJ IIIU I U
FLASH VANERILT
RETUR NSSATURDAY
BAND AND YELLMASTERS WILL
LE) ROOTES I SONGS
AND CHEERS
TO GIVE RESULTS ON
MINIATURE GRIDIRON
Board of Regents Grant Use of Hill
Auditorium; Admission to be
Charged
Announcement that the Varsity
band and cheerleaders will be in Hill
aditorium Saturday afternoon to lead
the students in songs and cheers as
the play by play returns from the Van-
derbilt game are flashed upon the
electric score b'yard, was made last
night by the Alumni association.
Permission for the band to take
part Saturday was granted several
days ago by Robert A Canipbell,
treasurer of the University and gen-
eral 4rector of the band. William H.
Franhauser, '22L, and Walter E.
Lustfield, '25L, leader and heaviest
xnan respecti rely, of the cherleading
squad, are the two men chosen by the
association to lead the cheers in the
auditorium-
The plan of the association is to
make the affair as near an exact re-
production of the actual game as is
possible. The grid graph, the elec-
trical miniature football gridron, is
said to. be the latest and most realis-
tic reproducer of football contests yet
brought out. It is made of ground
glass marked off into five yard lines
by white lights. Behind the glass a
large light, designating the pigskin,
moves un or down the field according
to the actual play made. This enables
the spectators to see just where the
ball is on the field at all times, and
the yardage gained. Other lights des-
ignate the players of both teams and
the various plays used.
It is thought that the band and the
cheerleaders will give to the whole af-
fair the one thing it would otherwise
lack fromresembling the actual game.
The band will play the "Victors"
and the other songs at the same time
as in the real contests, and the cheer-
leaders will lead the students as if
they were actually in the stands
watching the real ball moving on the
field. It is expected that with all of
these factors present that, not only
will the Vanderbilt game be re-creat-
ed but that the atmosphere and spir-
it of. an actual football game will' be
in the 'air.
Board of Regents Approve
The Board of Regents hastrecog-
niWed the pIlan by granting the ass-
ciation the use of Hill auditorium.
This makes it the first time that such
a gathering has been held oficially
and in which the whole student body
could assemble.
,The and will hold practice drill
for the Ohio State game on Ferry
field Saturday afternoon. Immediate-
ly after the drill it will march to Hill
auditorium where it will enter just at
the time when the game will begin at
Dudley field in Nashville. From then
on until the close of the game it will
remain on the platform of the audi-
toriun-
Student councilmen will also be
present at the meeting to help handle
the crowds. It is expected that an ad-
mission fee will be charged to help
defray expenses. All members of the
reserve squad and freshman team will
be admitted as guests of the Alumni
association free of charge, itt was an-
nounced.
HEALTH SERVICE TO TREAT
THROAT AND HEAD DISEASES

Dr. Walter T. Hotchkiss will have
oflice hours at the Health service
from 1 to 3 o'clock every afternoon
to examine students who have ear.
nose or throat diseases. Dr. Hotchkiss
who is a regular member of the oto-
larynology department of the Uni-
versity hospital will perform needed
operations in the new infirmary of
the Health service.
Hitherto, it has been necessary for
students to be referred to the Univer-
sity hospital for examination and oper-
ation. Operations will also be per-
forkned. A fee somewhat less than
that charged at the hospital, will, be
asked at the new infirmary.
Corduroy Coats $6.50 up. Wild and
Co.-Adv.

Coll

u

bus Could Have Foudid

Much More, Skeptic Thinks

Columbus discovered America fiveI
centuries ago, but the Frivolous Fel-
low doesn't think he is so much.
"Columbus received entirely too
much recognition; his value as a dis-
coverer is grossly overestimated," de-
clared the Frivolous Fellow to himself
this morning as he adjusted his trick
tic.
He continued to soliloquize, "I've
made equally as important twentieth-
century dscoveries my very own self
if any unbiased person should take the
i/J7TOA'/qAJ T-CO1Y/'BNO0K36,
O cl'QT C/T ylL /T/,'/ 'Z)
[ /7/077LgyV -
70It N 1J /(,qCNT/A T-J
,q/'iT TI-/I ~
a1t
<I
- c~QCyT../12,q
trouble to' investigate. I've found the
best place to get one's clothing press-
ed, I know the best tonsorialist, I'm
acquainted with positively the best es-
tablishment to get a tea-bone steak.
"And that isn't all I've discovered.
I've discovered the lit college isn't
the snap it's supposed to be, that the
women students will positively not act
friendly to one unless approached in
the most tactful studied manner, that
it's physically impossible to get Bet-
sy Barbour house on the telephone be-
tween 6 and 8 o'clock Friday nights,
that one cannot wear a derby on the

campus without being the recipient of
innumerable rough jests-and, oh,
lots of things."
Just then he discovered he had two
minutes to get to his "eight o'clock",
and he broke off his monologue to trot
towards the campus.
TO VilEST S AN
Football Sendoff and Ohio State Pep
Meeting Date Set for
Thursday, Oct. 19f
COUNCIL REDEFINES STATES1
OF ME N FROM JUNIOR COLLEGE
Distribution of tickets for football
games played at home was one of the
important things to come before the
Student council at its meeting held
last night at the Union. All fresh-
men will sit in the West stand at the

News Of The ay
Paris-.rules J. Jusserand, ambas-
satlor to America, will sail Oct. 21.
Berlin-Four postal employes were,
arrested, charged with taxing foreign-
ers double rate for telegrams.
Washington -, Postal service to
Greece has been suspended, including
general mail to Smyrna; applies also
to parcel post.
Havana-General Crowder has not
started to the IUnited States, due to al
last minute hitch in the legislative
program.
Smyrna--No plans are being made
for a peace conference here; there is
no chance of getting adequate quar-
ters, due to the fire.
Buenos Aires-nonorlo Pueyrre-
don, foreign minister, has been of-
fered the Argentine ambassadorshipl
to Washington, ,it is said.
Athens-The American Red Cross
fund of $750,000, hurried here, per-
mitted auick distribution of clothes
to Asia Minor refugees.

there were only 3,350 persons out of
work in all France Sept. 1, according
to latest figures.
Tokio-The case of R. M. Andrews,
American, accused of photographing
fortifications, still is in the hands of
the court; his lawyers are pressing
for an early trial.-
Moscow--A new Soviet Russian
famine board will begin work Oct. 15;
Americans still are to have chtrge
of distribution of supplies.
Mexico City - General Murgula's
horse, saddled, with sword and re-
peating rifle tied to it, were captured
by General Escobar's men, says the
war department.
Paris-Joseph Caillaux, ex-premier,
in a letter given to the press, de-
nounces "the return of clericalism" to
France; it appears this is his return
to politics.
Teheran--Seyed Jellat and 13 in-
surgent' disciples were put to death
with machine guns in the public
square at Resht as a warning to re-
bels.
Mexico City- nxecution of the Sa-
linas brothers,, convicted of aiding

Murguia, was suspended on order of 1 Cord
War Secretary Serrano, after their Co.-A
mother made a personal plea to Pres- -
ident Obregon.
Rone-Election day has not been
fixed, but the political campaign is
in full swing; Facisti say if they
don't get control of the government
through the voters they will seize it
forcibly.

rYPEw
FOR]
Hanm
usins
Cta"e and 14

RITERS
RENT
'S College
Villiams Sts.

London-Mohammed VI., Turkey's
sultan, again is said to have abdi-
cated; this time he demanded Kemal
express himself, but the Nationalist
dictator is said to be waiting until!
after the peace conference.
Tokio-The Foreign Office has in-
quired as to a Pekin report that the
Sinclair oil concern (California) has
a concession on Sakhalien Island from
the Chita goverment.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

13
S

I

omI

'!i

How Much Time
Do You Waste ?

ti

San Salvador-Honduras advices
say martial law has been lifted (In-
voked due to rebellious outbreaks).

R-C
C'OM~iNO

A D
SUNDAY

E

DENANS REVIEW NEW
BUILDING P L A N

S

(Continued from Page One)
rushed at top speed with the hope
that it will be completed soon enough
to take advantage of the hoped for
authorization to proceed with the
foundation construction.
Members of the Dean's Advisory
committee met with the Committee of
Five Tuesday for a general discus-
sion of the plans for the new Literary
building.
The opening of work on the new
building is contingent upon the grant-
ing tf permissionsbythe finance comi
mittee of the state administrative
board. A meeting of this committee has
been promised by state officials, as
soon as its absent members are able
to attend.
Regent William L. Clements of Bay
City, a member of the Committee of
Five, was in the city for the meeting.
HARRIER?; uERGED T TURN
OUT FOR AFTERNOON RUNS
(Continued from Page One)
purposd of putting cross country on
an equal footing with the other sports,
have revised the rulings, so that the
M will be awarded to the six members
of a cross country team which places
first or second in a Conference meet,
or to any individual who places fif-
teenth or better in a Conference meet,
6 to #ny man who places first in a
dual meet, or second in two dual
ineet -

games and no women, whatsoever,v
will be allowed to enter these seats.
The other classes will be seated in
sections blocked off for them.
The committee working on this
matter consists of James Hume, '23,
Harry C..Clark, '24, and Lawrence
Favrot, ;'24. One member of thisC
committee will be in the Athletic of-
fice every afternoon from 5 to 6 to
hear any complaints.
Thursday, Oct. 19, was the day set
for the Ohio State pep meeting and
it is also planned to have a sendoff
for the team when they leave for Ohio'
State. A committee was appointed
to look after the arrangements for
both of these affairs.
Band Tag Day Considered
Action to set a tag day to send the
band, cheerleaders and the freshman
football team to Columbus for the
Ohio State game was voted on favor-
ably but no definite day was selected.
It is likely that it will be held early
next week, however.
It was decided that the Michigan
block "M" would be in the stands for
the Wisconsin game only as it was
the concensus of opinion that tradi-
tion held that the block "M" should
be in the stands only at the last game
of the season.
Cheerleader Uniforin Designs Asked
Tryouts for cheerleader positions
will be given another chance to con-
pete for openings which may occur
from time to time in the present
squad. Suggestions for uniforms from
the campus are requested and these
may be sent to the Student council,
in care of Mr. Edward Haug, '23F.1.
In regard to men coming here from
Junior colleges, the council upheld
the action of last year which stated
that men entering the University withj
encugh hours to be rated a sophomore
by the University should be rated so.
by the campus and likewise for jun-
iors and seniors. Men who have not
the required number of hours to rate
as sophomores in the University are,
ccnsidered freshmen on the campusI
and are subject to all freshman rules.
Rich To Rive Address in Chicago
"Standardization of Gear Noises"
will be the topic upon which Assist-
ant Professor L. L. Rich of depart'
ment of physics will address the
American association of gear manu-
facturers in Chicago sometime this
week. Professor Rich left Ann Arbor
Sunday to attend the convention of
the association which is being held in
Chicago this week.

LEARN TO

SAVE YOURSELF TIME
GET BETTER GRADES
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William Streets

Tvpewrite
YOUR
THEMES
NOTES and
ESSAYS

Paris-The Labor Department says

f l i.- } c ti4 - °"
i 'U f p
r i t }

YOUR
NOTE PAPER
IS YOU.

k, e

You express your own person-
ality, your individuality by the
style, shape, color and quality
aT your correspondence paper,
and envelopes. See our large
stock. From our variety you'll
find the letter paper you shouldi
use. Fountaintpens, pencils,
inks, blotters, etc.
0. D. MOR RIL
17 iNIV1ELS ARCADE
The Typewriter and Stationery
Store

Y 0 U will find un-
excelled quality of

Sharpening wood pen-
cils means loss of time
and effort.
1 rS
T n all pencil sharpen-
Costs less to use than
Wood pencils.
Uses double length leads,
cach equal to a seven inch
wood pencil in writing
rcrvice. Guaranteed not to
c1 "r at the point.
TheE ATHERWEIGHT-
sw here-oflightweight
Silver, $1.00.
c this and the other Inger-
sol n i ods at your station-
cry or cO-oerative store.
Iigersol iIe poznt Co., Inc.
Win.YH. Ingersoll, Pres.
461 ourthAve., New York City

THE CAMPUS THEATRE

,1'

List Times

Tonight

work, good

service

Positively

and reasonable prices

AT

Ann Arbor Steam Dye Works
204 E. WASHINGTON
Mail Orders Now
FOR WHITNEY THEATRE ENGAGEMENT
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY - OCTOBER 2 AND 21 F
PMCES: Orchestra, $2.'0; Balcony, 1st 4 rows, $2; next 4 rows, $1.50;
balance, $1. Saturday Matinee: Orchestra, $2; Balcony, 4 rows, $1.50;
balance, $1. Add 10 per ceut tax, send self-addressed, stamped enve-
lope and niake remittances payable to Whitney Opera House. Box-
office sale opens Wednesday, October 18.

'Where Does; thes Jazz Trail Lead?
- C~°L ASCY PlREtS .
ecil B.DeMiIIes
PRODUCTION
rf s, gte '
Thorn
Thomas Neidhan'
-e atrice Joy oi itson
Cast also

includes:
John
Miltern
George
Fawcett
Julia
Faye
and others

Are the sons and daughters of
the rich leading the kInd of life
that nade Rome fall
D ilile shows 'you in this pie-
ture - the greatest lie ever
n"le With Leatrice Joy, the
society bdauty, who sets the
fasstest pace, and Ton Meigh-
an, the man who loves her.

,l

DR. W. S. MILLS
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
616 First Nat'l Bk. Bldg.
Office Hours Phone
9-12; 1:30-5 321-F1

Paris. - The
strike is over;
Marseilles.

Bordeaux seamen's
the strike is worse at

F IDAY-SATVRDAYf-ONLY

hh -

Though a hius-
hand can't be
a hero to his
wife - it takes
a hero to be a
husband!,

IIl

Cordtir - l

$ 00

to

$900

jl

COMNG

A
SUNI

IAA

-0.1 1
1
,{
\ !

il'

TINKER

& COMPANY

..

SO. STATE ST. AT WILLIAM ST.

(mayI

k.-ll %- A EMTA

aT~rMCI1ON

Yes - the same two women and one man
BVT-
- there's a difference! Yes, sir!
For this wife wouldn't mind if "the other woman"

f

m I

U- U IL. aIAIr l U a W -9 SA-A

tn

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan