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May 26, 1923 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-05-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAWY

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AN MEETS 0. S, U. TODAY IN
L DUAL TRACK MEET oF YER

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"Georgia Peach"
stil i PRynning
As Great Player,

FISHER'S IUNDEFEATED NINE. MEETS
VI, S, N. C. TODAY ON, FERRY FIELD,

SPORT SNAP SHOTS

ell's Squad Doped to Win Easily
From Buckeye Runners at
Columbus
EYE BIG TEN CLASSIC
iJUNE 1-2 AT FERRY FIELDI

With hopes flying high and witi
ne of the largest squads he has evei
aken to a dual meet, Coach Stev
Frrell arrived in Cohmbus las
ulght, where he will send the Wolver-
Lue track aggregation against Oik
State today in the final test before the
Western classic here next week.
With 28 men making the trip Btvc
will have at least two capable 'per-
rmers in every event. This meet
will give ' every capable performer
o the team a chance to show his
wares before the Big Ten meet, thus
giving Coach Farrell a good line o
tis performers.
MacEliven, Brooker ilid by Work
The team will be somewhat weak-
ned by the remaining home of Brook-
r, star pole vaulter and discus throw-
r, ang MacEliven, one of Steve's.best
>ets in the high jump. Both of these
non chose to remain home in order
: prepare for oncoming examinations
n the Law school which might have
nterferod with their participation in
he Confe~rece' meet.
Captain Burke, Wittman and Gold-
rater will carry the Michigan colors
n tho dashes. All of these men are
ast and sone fast timetshould be re-
stered if conditions are right. Martin,
lemons and Joyner are the men up-
n whom Steve has pinned his hopes
n the uarter. But 'it is rather doubt-
uil if any of these men will be able
o b'"eas te ap ahead of Everett
tho has regsteed the quarter in bet-
er than 50 seconds. None of the Wol-
erines appear to be this fast.
Close High Hurdles
The high hurdle race will probably
e clse as Hubbard and Snyder have
oth topped the high timbers in the
5 2-5 whichi is fast time. Snyder,
owever, will undoubtedly be hamper-
d by an injury received in the early
art of the season. Aubrey looms as
possible third place winner, Loomis
eems to be the best Michigan man in
he low hurdle as he recently topped.
he sticks in' t5which is abut 'what
ynder is capable of.
The Michigan half milers appea t tc
ave a chance to slam this event a
ia trio, Reinke, Hattendorf and Roes-
or are all fast men. Kreider of Ohio
tate is also ppeedy, having turned in
time of 1:57, Bowen will probably
ave to.' concee defeat to Kilpatrick.
tar Buckeye distance man, in the
iee . In a recent meet with Indiana,
te ;star , miler was unable to place
uze to Inhjries a d it may turn out
hat he will experience the' same dif-
culty today but it is doubtful. Rear-
k, Michigan's other entry in this
ce will have to fight hard to place.
Watch lsell
Isbell and Davis should have things
retty niuch their own way in the two
ile as the Buckeyes seem to be no-
ceably weak in this event. Isbell's
ce will be watched closely as it s
imored that the Michigan star iay
reak a few records if running con-
tions are right. Davis who is also
strong runner is expected to be
Lse to Isbel at the finish.
Boni Petcoff, Ohio's best bet, will
robably emerge victor in the javelin
s he has thrown the shaft around
5 feet. Landowski and Steger are
*e Michigan entries in this event with
.i former reigning as the dark horse.
Points in Jumps and Weights
Smith is expected to win the high
mp as he has ,consistently cleared
x feet. Nufer may also score some
>iuts for the Wolverines in this
'ent. Hubbard' will win the broad
mp, while Aldrich may cop second
ace, as he jumps around 22 feet.
andowski, Prosser and Kelley are
I good men in the pole vault and
Il probably add on a lot of points
r the Wolverines.
Ohio may be forced to be content

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Expected To Win
5 Points Today
S !
William J. Van Orden
S'tar WolQ,-rine Weight man and
the leading shot putter of the Western
Conference, who should experience no
difficulty in taking first place from the
Buckeyes in his event this afternoon I
at Columbus.
with third place ii' the shot put as
both Van Om'den and Hindes sling the
lead around 43 feet which is far' su-
perior to the performances of the
Buckeye huskies. Hindes and Schmidt
will place high in the hammer throw
while Hunter has a chance to annex
fiyepoints. in the discus.
CLASS TENNIS TES

Detroit, May 25.-(By A.P.)--Tyrus
Raymond Cobb,. variously yclept "The
Peerless One" and "The Georgia
Peach," is not yet among the bench
manager class, despite his a3 years
and the thinning hairs on his head.
Frequent predictions, first heard when
he succeeded Hughie Jennings as
manager of the Detroit Tigers two
years ago, that he was through as a
player, have failed of fulfillment.
Leader is Crafty
the destinies of the 1923 Tigers from
the player who flashed among the
major league constellations in 1905,
gaining in brilliancy and renown un-
til in 1921 he became a .420 batter.
The speed that gave Cobb a new major
league record for stolen bases in 1915,
with a total of 98,. is waning, but in
its place has come craftiness, and
because he had so much speed to lose,
he still is a great outfielder, still a
dangerous man on the paths.
At bat, he is the same "Peach." His
eye seems as clear as in his earlier
days when he was the bugbear of all
pitchers in the league. He continues,
to meet the ball squarely, andahis fac-
ulty of d'riving the ball out of reach ofr
the fielders seen greater, if anything,,
Sthis year than ever.
Continues as Player
From the start of this season he has
had the Tigers among the league lead-
ers. Close followers of the game have
seen in Detroit the principal menace to
the New York Yankees in this season's
race. Cobb's heavy artillery is con-;
ceeded to be the equal of the New York
glub's "murderers' row," and his pitch-
ing staff, considered the principal
weakness of the club, has shown sur-
prisingly well during the first month,
the veteran Dauss especially appear-
ing near the peak of his form.
Some critic see indications that
Cobb may direct his club from the
bench soon, in the acquisition of two
slugging recruits, Fothergill and Man-
ush, both of whom. have been used
effectively this year, but Cobb smiles
and continues to tale his - stand in
centerfield.
Illini Seconds
Yost Statement
The Daily Illini last Friday con-
tained a story under the head "F. H.
Yost Opposes East-West Games,"q
which gave the reasons as Coach Yost
saw them why Michigan is not send-
ing her team to the Eastern collegiate
track meet which is being held at
Philadelphia yesterday and today.
These are essentially the same
points as outlined by the coach at theI
track pep meeting held Friday, May
11, in Hill auditorium, when he repliedI
to thd criticism of the Maize and Blue
team's going East.1
"Michigan's athletic opponents," hea
declared, "are in the middle west,
particularly in the Western Confer-
ence. The whole matter resolves it-
self as before, to the natural and
most feasible selection of opponents.
We know each other in the middlet
,west and we can readily reach each
other. .There is mutual regard among
us. Perhaps in the East we would
be strangers."
Hold Final Range Practice Today
Membes of the R. 0. T. C. will hold
the final range practice of the year
tat 9 o'clock this morning on the eR.
0. T. C. rifle raie. Firing at 200, 300
and 500 yards slow fire will comprise
the schedule for today.' All wishing to
1 participate in the practice should re-
port -to the R. 9. T. C. office at 9
o'clock this morning.

'Game Should be Practice uessin;
O'Hara, Stryker, or Noonan
May Get Monnd Call
MAKE READY FOR OH10 STATE
TRIP MONDAY AS END NEARS
Elated over the Wolverine victory
from Illinois Thursday afternoon.
Michigan's Varsity baseball team
went through a snappy practice ses-
sion on Ferry field yesterday in pre-
paration for the game with Western
State Normal college of Kalamazoo
this afternoon.
With the defeat of the Indians, Mich-
igan practically clinched the chain-
pionship title of the Big Ten 'or the
present season. The Varsity lAs only
three more games to play, and is al-
most certain to win at least two of
them.
Buckeyes second
Ohio State, who is now resting int
second place in the race for Confer-
ence honors will face the Wolverines
Monday on the Buckeye diamond at
Columbus and if Coach Fisher's men
come through with another victory
over 0. S. U. they are assured of top
honors in the Conference. Ohio State
'has already lost one game to 'Michi-
gan, her only defeat of the season,
but the Buckeye schedule is not as
long as that of Michigan so that even.
losing the game Monday, the Maize
and blue could stand another defeat
at the hands of Northwestern or Wis-
consin, who are yet to be played, and
still remain at the head of the stand-
Today's contest should be more in
the nature of a practice tilt then a1
tight game. While the Normalites hold
a 9-0 victory over Minnesota they have
done nothing else this year to show
any semblance of a real aggregation.
Michigan already has one victory to
her credit over the Celery City team,
nat'ing defeated them on their home
diamond on the last road trip of the
Wolvernes.
Regulars to Start
The Varity line-up will probably
be almost the same as that which
handed the Ilhini their trimming
Thursday. Coach Fisher will no doubt
use plenty of second stingg men if
Michigan puts the game on ice in the
early innings but it seems almost cer-
tain that the regular combination will
get the call at the start of the fra-
cas.
"Fisher has not yet selected his
choice for mound duty against Kala-
mazoo but the chances are that it will'
fall to. Pat O'Hara, Stryker, or Noon-
an with probably gn ore than one of
them taking a tun in the box.
Owing to his recent injuries it may
be that Shackleford will be given a
rest with Dillman taking the initial
sack but the remainder of the team
will be composed of the first string
men with' Blott behind the bat, Paper,
Uteritz and Haggerty in the infield
and Ash, Kipke and Klein taking care
of the outer gardens.
INTRAMURAL TRYOUTS FOR I
NEXT YEAR ARE WANTED t
I Tryouts for Intramural activi-
ties are wanted immediately.
Eight assistant managers are to
be selected for next year. All
mun interested in this branch of
« ork should get in touch with(
the Intramural department, 2268, I
at once. , I

Intramural Items
In the semi-finals of the All-cam-
pus tennis doubles tournament the
following matches are scheduled to be
played. The finals in this tournament
will then be run off Monday afternoon:
Garber-Hicks 1324-J vs. McKnight-
Hartwell, 1597-M; Dunakin-Zook 63
vs. Birks-Flowers 1166. - .
in thd interfraternity tennis tourna-
ment the following teams are in the
semi-finals, which will be played off
today: Beta Theta Pi vs. Psi Uption;
Delta Tau Delta vs. winner Kappa Nu-
Masama match. The finals in this
tournament will be run off Monday.
Following are the men who are
scheduled to play in the semi-finals of
the All-campus tennis singles: Grein-
er 909 vs. Zook 1690-R; Crane 243-M
vs. winner Schaefer-Goldsmith match.
The finals in this tournament also will
be played Monday."
American League
R H E
Chicago................. 5 10 1
Detroit ................... 3 5 2
Faber and Pchalk; Pillette, Cole and
Woodall.
R H E
New York............... 2 11 0
Philadelphia ... ....... 4 7 2
Shawkey and Schang; Naylor and
Perkins.
Washington-.-............. -,- 1
Boston .................... 6 10 1
Johnson and Ruel; Piercy, Murray
and Devormer.
Cleveland at St. Louis-Rain.
0tionial League
R H E
Philadelphia.... . ........ 12 1
New York ............ ...12 14' 0
Mitchell, Bishop, Weinert and Hen
line; Nehf and Snyder.
R H E
Boston..... . . .. ......7 15 1
Brooklyn........... ..4 12 2
Oeschger, Benton and O'Neill; Rue-
ther and Taylor.
It H E
St. Louis.................. 1 4 0
Pittsburgh...............2 10 1
Doak and Clemons; Morrison and
Gooch.
R 1-I E
Cincinnati .. .......... 0 2 1
Chicago.................4 9 1
Donohue and Wingo; Alexander and
O'Farrell.
Get good values cheap, thru the
Classified columns.-Adv.
"Jimmie the adtaker" sells anything
quickly. -Ad.
Pe
Patronize The Daily advertisers.

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(B I~y ,Iack fP ie) ';hard enough to hurt. In the second
"Pop" Geers, the si~lnteinsiman, round his natural color returned and
has arrived at North Randall race lie began to fight with more confid-
track (Cleveland, C.y, to commence [ence. From that' point on he fought
his fifty-first season's campaign, be- a careful, but confident battle. Instead
hind the sulky. With him is Sanar-,of tiring as he went along he improved
'do, 1:59 1-2, the khampion pacing in every round. It was the youthful
gelding of the half-mile tracks. It Johnson who wilted under the strain
was with Sanardo that he toured the of battle.,
country last year, deserting the Grand ( Johnson forced the fighting from the
Circuit in midseason to do exhibition start. iHe won four r.ounds and got
miles with his little gelding. ian oven break in another because of
Geers on January 25 celebrated his his aggressiveness. But although
seventy-second birthday. He spent !Willard allowed Johnson to set the
the day at his stables in Mi\emphis, pace Jess did not hang. back. When-
and the following day drove his own ever the occasion called for an ad-
car 220 miles into Mississippi to at- ance he did not hesitate to make it.
tend a fox hunt. Daily during the In the old days Jess invariably fail-
winter and spring he has- seen to the ed to follow; up an advantage. He al-
training of his horses. No other driv- lowed many opponents to go the lim-
er is permitted to test their speed on it anil he lost several bouts because he
the track, and the result is that "Pop" stopped fighting at the point where he
does fron twenty to forty miles a day 1 should have been fighting his hardest.
in the sulky. Rain, snow or sleet has There was not a trace of that fatal
no effect on the old man. He has a fault in his work against Johnson. Ev-
time for training, and when the time e ry time he stung Johnson with one of
comes he drives, regardless of the his lifting uppercuts Jess forced as
elements. hard as Jack Dempsey does under,
"Pop's" lfopes are high this year. similar circumstances. Perhaps it
Sanardo never has shown the early was Dempsey who taught Jess Wil-
season form displayed this spring. lard the lesson that a fighter cannot
Contracts calling for several exhibi- afford to be lenient in the ring.
tions, and totaling in the neighbor- Although Johnson, with his feeble
hood of $20,000, already have been bitting, was as helpless as a toy dog
signed. His other pacers and trotters fighting a mastiff, the youngster's
are in fine fettle. courage aroused the admiration of t1h
Geers left Memphis confident that crowd. He was not able to put a
Sanardo will establish a new record scratch on Willard with his hardest
for the half-mile tracks and, perhaps, blows, but he never lost heart. He kept
a new one for the mile. The Driving right on plunging in until he was
club track in Memphis is in poor con-!knocked cold.

dition and except for one trial over
the half-mile track at the fair groun(I,
Sanardo has had no fast test. After+
the trial, Geers, usually noncommit-
tal, declared that he was satisfied.

rTickets
Ticke
meet:. to
ai nos

One of the remarkable things about
Jess Willard is that at the end of his The s
career he should find a fighting spirit and the
that he never had before. Jess might admit to
have been the greatest glove fighter that th
that ever lived if in the days of his Confere
youth had he fought with as nmuch Athletic
;spirit as he showed against Johnson.
Jess has been out of the ring so Last of
long that in the opening round he was Los A
nervous as a novice making his first gersoll,
appearance. His face was a green- the Uni
ish gray as he sat in his corner wait- eratives
ing for the bell to start that fight that died at
would prove whether all his weary night.
months of training had been in vain. ,ed as 1
Willard found out in the first round dent Li
that his young onponent could not hit Stanton.
-iA A A A

for Cowference Meet on Sple
ts for the Conference track
be held June 2 at Ferry field
w on sale at the Athletic as-
n, ticket office for $1.50 apiece.
at at this meet are reserved
student athletic books do not
o it. This is due to the fact
e meet is conducted by the
fce association and not by the
association.
Lincoln's Messengers Dead
Angeles, May 25.-Egbert In-
said to have been the last of
ted States secret service op-
on duty during the civil war,
his home here Wednesday
io was 100 years old. He act-
personal messenger for Presi-
ncoln and Secretary of War

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Class tennis teams which will play
off preliminary matches early next
week and play for the championship
on Field day, May 31, were announced
yesterday.
The senior team has the followilmg
members: Catherine Heller, captain,
Josephine Connable, Martha Dodd,
Mary Cutting, Dorothy Klooz, and Ge-
orgia Church. The junior team is com-
posed of Annabelle Burdick, captain,
Marguerite Cain, Winifred Craigie,
Elizabeth L4auver, Katherine Ains-
worth, and Eleanor Steele. The soph-
oiores have a team of Elizabeth
Rancks, captain, Lucile Bellamy, Win-
ifred Pollock,' Grace Domboorajian, 01-
ga Verdelin, and'Adelaide Sherer. The
members of the. freshman team are
Elizabeth Tompkins, captain, Marion
Bigelow, Marian Lindsley, Pearl La-
pish, Alice Young, and Alice Lang-
thorn.
IMutst lWake Reservations for Banquet
Reservation for the annual banquet
of the University Chamber of Com-
merce should be made at once, ac-
cording to the committee in .charge
of arrangements. A member of the
committee will be in the office of the
organization, room 142, Natural
Science building from 1 to 5 o'clock
today and from 1 to 5 o'clock Monday
afternoon. That will be the last time
that reservations can be made.
If that check didn't come, let "Jim-
mie" sell something for you to tide
you over.-Adv.

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LAST
TIMES
2:00
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The Daddy of "Tol'able David" and

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AT, SMOKE, DRINK,
REST AND PLAY
'sMichigan men are In-
ted. requested, and ex-
cted to make use of1
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We DoMuaisob tthladhndes, pisale Yd o willsave $.10Wto$3.00ASHJr~
Mex.'s and Wmen's newsping and PRICSmO ALL SLOE, OXFORDS,

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Here's romance'crammed with
excitement and heart-tug. With
the lawlw I entucky feuid country
as the setting. A muti story
with the same stirri:g appeal as'
"Tol'able David."

ALSO
"The Mummy'

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It's a Sunshine

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