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April 28, 1923 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,L AIL N

t t C iVl li,..ii .

I I U2.~ iVIJA..~i J DA!LX

I

ECISAL BULLETIN,
hetin Is construcetive notice to all members ofJ
eceived until 3:30 a. m. (11:30 a. M. Satu'4ax.;

S1

ates z
athe College of Literature, Sciwnce, and the arts and in
ucation who expect to receive a Teachers Certificate in
sir fees at this time. Blanks should be secured from, the
of or Education and the receipt returned to that office

MARGARET CAMERON.

it Club:
the next meeting of the Graduate E~nglish Club is chanked
Aril 30, to Wednesday, M~ay 2. It will -be held at Helen
nce at 8 p. mn.
MARIAN H-. STUDLEYX.
r the full band at Lane Bll, 2 p. i. Full Dress Uniform.
WVILFRED WILSON, Director.

The "Legende Symphonique' re- Of ranc
ceived its premiere by the Warsaw' 'c V F a c
Philharmnonic society and was subse- InU S o,
quently given unde~r the baton of I U.S." orIde
Nikisch by the Berlin Philharmonic.
Schelling's violin concerto, dedecated
to Fitz Krelsler, has been played fre-
quently by that distinguished artist,i
while his newly " published "Victory,
Sall" has been described as the most
brilliant and original musical' compo-"
I ition inspired by the Great War.
i Genius of Rare Order
Schelling is firmly entrenched inc
the front rank among living masters
of the pianoforte. The representa- r
tive critics are agreed'that his genius
is unquestionably of a rare order and
ththsaiiya opsrgrowing rapidly. The late H. E. Kreh- 1
Biel declared that he played~ "in a
manly and beautiful st~ le with a
large, singing tone and 'fine 'senti-ef
merit' while 'Philip HMale of the Bbs-1n
ton Herald commented that "he has ;t ,
virility that is not coarse and a deli-
caythat is not "lackadaisical. His
touch has character and beauty. His
sentiment is genuine and his passion
is artistically controlled."'' Schelling
is .also popular with the; public whol.
b'ane. thronged his many New York X Andre' Citroen
recitals during'recent months. M. Andre Citroeji. the "Henry Fort:
of France, is in the, 'United Statest
Postpone Tan Beta.. P1 Initiation get new manufacturing ideas. Bursi
Sprin~g initiation ceremonies and nwihergbstng'thfc
banqu~et of Tan. Beta Pi, national hon- igwt nry rsln ihfc
orary engineering fraternity, have, been always in a hurry, he is a de l1ux

r

110 nni[T Irwin's Pep orchestra from Pittsburgh
0 ROnzIC 1and by Kennedy's local orchestra.
9 EEEEE LL.. ttlU'i}The patrons and patronesses for
SALE WEDNSOA the ball are: President Marion L.
Burton and Mrs. Burton, Dean John
- R. Effinger and Mrs. Effinger, Dean
Tickets to the F+rosh Frolic, which Hlenry Al. Bates and Mrs. Bates, Dean
ito be held Mta 5 at the Union, will Joseph A. Bursley and Mrs. Bursley,

I

go on general sale "Wednesday after-
noon at the Union. Approximately 10
more tickets wvill be sold.j
The annual formal dance of the first
year men will have decorations much
of the same type as -those at this year's
Sophomore Prom. Continuous music
will be furnished for the dance by

mean ii ~Aim Iumpnhieys anarĀ±VJ':.-
Ilumphreys, Dean George A. Patter-,
son and Mrs. Patterson, Dean Jean'
Hamilton, Prof. Rollo 'E. McC'otter-
and Mrs. McCotter, Coach Fielding H.
Yost and Mrs. Yost, Coach George E.
Little, Prof. Louis A. Strauss and -Mrs.
Strauss, Prof. Emil Lorich and Mrs.
Lorch, Prof. Robert M. Wenley and
Mrs. Alenley, Prof. Charles B. Vib-

I
t.
t ' ;
I

'; It

SOCK
I I'S T

\A

idrleitt l
Prof. Harle
ainy departnw'
ton where he
the National
will last for

orsi

1Research Coun
several clays.

1 4

4

HAVE YOU TRIED-

The new deliciously

Tariff
ite Houses

lertsonf
;on, vice-chair-;
fission, recently.
ent Harding at
ie boost in su,-

6:O-P11rofessor Vibbert svgas at tihe!
students' supper in Harris: hail. .
6 :30-Wesleyan guild meets Jn Mot1-
odist church.
6 -:30-Cosmopolltan club meets in. Con.
gregational church. Foreign stu-
dents speak,
CI-NOTICE
All sophloniores desiring to play class
Kbaseball call Bill Reid at 508 to-
day.
Festival Notes
Ernest fichelmg, Pianist
Ernest' Schelling, who, will play his
"Suite Fantasttque", for'piano and or-
chestra at the fifth May Festival con~-
cert, Saturday afternoon, May 19, is
one of the few American pianists of
the first rank, in addition to being
one of the most prolific and power-
ful of living composers.
He was born in Belvidere, New Jer-
sey, 47 years ago and made his debut
at the Academy: of Music in Pbila-
delphia "at' four and a half years of
age. When he was seven years old,
his father placed him under the tute-
lage of Mathias, a distinguished }pupil
of Chopin at the Paris conservatoire.
Two years of study sufficed to develop
his pianistic powers to such an extent
that for the succeeding five years,
Schelling toured Europe as 'an infant
prodigy. Following a period of in-
struction from Leschetizsky, he met
Pad erewskf . when 17 years of age.
Five years before, that great musi-
clan had heard' Schelling and "had pre-1
dicted for him 'a promising future. I
Accordingly, Paderewski invited hinm
to study at his chateau in Switzer-
land where he rem ,ined for' thrge
years maturing his art 'Under eXpert
supervision.
Takes Paderewskl's Place
When Paiderewski was unable to
play at the National Polish Centennial
celebration of the birth of Chopin in
1909, he recommended Schelling as his
substitute,, and on the night of Schel-
ling's first great triumph in. the con-
cert, field, Paderewski cabled: "My
love and congratulations to you--once
my, pupil now my colleague." Schel-
ling and Paderewsk~i have since. re-
mained close friends, and it was Seboli-
liug who 'revived 'Padeiewski's piano
concerto in 'A minor in his remarkable
series of "all-concert' concerts given
in New York during the se;Wson now
closing.
Fame as Composer
Although Schelling's piano virtuos-
ity is now generally acknowledged,:
his fame as 'a composer is far frgrm
slight. His "Suite Fantastique," whichl
Ann Arbor will hear, has been pro-.
duced all over Europe under Mengel- I
berg, to whom it is dedicated, and
under Walter Damrosch, Karl. Muck,
Arthur Nikisch and Frederick Stock.
His "Impressions of an Artist's ife"
fwas accepted by Karl Muck before it
was finished and was played by the
Boston Symphony orchestra and the
orchestras of Philadelphia and Chi-I
cago-fifteen times during the season
of 1916-1917.

refreshing drink

to;
ts,

i

a

"400"

postponed ,to May 5.
have been held today.

They were to

French edition of the American lusti-
er or! live wire. Citroen makes autos.

THE, CIIOCOLATE DAIRY DRINK

-

GUARANTEED

5 c per botte

A beautiful display of

6
6

I

11

PAIRS
MONTHS
Without D

$150

PATTERN

I

Ask for it 'at your restaurant

r

- OR CALL-

We haive a good assortmen,
-your size and your faivorit(
colors-but they won't las
long. So come in now an(
take advantage of this rea
Sock. insuirance opportunity.

11

I

ii.

3 28 S. MAIN

Fouirth and Catherine Streets

}"ASION PAIL( COR
:Iegit to 11uerth ' ' eatrea

I

it

it.

Keep away from this nuisance
--enjoy sock insurance-by
buying '"Bullet-Proof" Hose
for Men; guaranteed 6 hpairs
6 months, without darning; for
only $150!
Twenty-five cents a pair for
r-cal hosiery value-guaran-
teed. Made of high grade 4-
ply material, with specially
reinforced heel and toe.
ullet
Proof

wmmmm w

I I wo - ei

i ..

.t

OF

)ING ON
is column, shorld
:30k o'clock of;
l cflt i at.
AY
"eigii Wars dance
the Union.
Aldin hWsebll,

Ith ,Ave. and William St.
REV. L." F., GU DER3IAN, Pastor
9:30 A. AL-Bible School.
1.0:30 A. M.--"Helps. nd iliaid ratuezs
to Woship.

'J kJL4 i 4J
4019 S. Division
Sunday kMorning
Service. 10:30
SiihJeet: "PROBATIO~N
Suniday School, 11:45.

I

Formerly many Wien thought of God as an absentee.
lie was prE!eet in the. world and life only in the
miracle. Today thoughtful men are thinking in the
terms of immanence. "God is a spirit." "Whither
shall I flee from Thy presence?" 1odern knowledge
of the universe is forcing us to this way of thinking.
God becomes the co-worker of mlan in prayer, aspira-
tion,, character building, high. endeavor, and sacri-
ficial service. -The presence of God is for many still
mnre('ognized in nature's laws, man, history, other
religions, and science. The limitation upon the Di-
vine Spirit is in man's slowness, apathy, indifference,

ignzorance, and sin.' No other= conception of (Godl is
adeoquate for today. No other conception can bear
the strain of modern thought and knowledge a3nd
life, The great universe demands a great conception
of Godl. " When"I became a man I put away childishi
things." A child',, ideas cannot suippoart a man's 'life.
"The man who is convinced that the Creative P'oweri-
from wbiph ill things come is spiritual belie"ves ini
God.", Christianity asserts that this SpiritNwhoni nO
man hiath'cver seen is unveiled in the life of Jesus.

l'

I

WeTdnesday Evouing, otes
mneeting, 7:30.
Reading Room, 236 Nickel:
cade. Open daily 12 to 5 c
Sundays iand 1holidays.
ALLA o ARE WrlCi'OME

dinner

EV1jAYONE IS WELCOME

InI

R. EDWARD SAYLES5.

J Rho dinner In room
Omega dinner In
'Union.
m IBilleq class 1e1"0
s meet in room 316
is nfeet in room 302
11)AY
Men's Ililale classi
room., Lane hrail.
aub mneets in room

r

V

1~

IFIRST BAPTIST

I i

&I

State and Hurom Streets

StyiDEY S. ROBTNS, Minister

Fifth Ave. and Washington St.
E. C. STELLIIORN, Pastor
9:00) A. Al,-Bible study hour.

I

clas s,
in Upper

Church ofI
room, Lane

lasses meet in

10:40 A. ,M.- "Tlxe Beloved ,Com-
munity.
5:45 P. M.---tudents' Supper.
6 ;30 P'. U.--Mr. T. L Adams, presi-
dent of the Big' Creek Institute,
Kentucky, mwill speak

10:30 A. M.-Sermon, 4,The On~enes
of Christ's Workers."
5:30 P. M.--Student Forum. Rev.
L. F. Gunderman will lead in dis-
cussing "1'hat is 3Meant by Sal-
VatiO11."
7:30 P'. M.-Sermon, "The Unity of
' ChrhV4 sChurch."
All, services will be conducted in
the English language.

4tAve., inear Packard
G1. 'A. 1NEU11ANNN Pastor
Sunday School. at 9:00 a. M.
Church Service at 10:00 a. in. Eug-
Church Serrice 1:1:00 a.' m. Ger-
man.
Students .Cordially _Welcomed

A\D

;1'

10: 30-MoTrning 'Worship. Sermon,
"Tho U nexpeeted Iii Chrst.'' 1r.
Sayles.
12:00-Students Class at Guild
House. Mr. Chapman.
6:00-Friend shiip 'lour. All Stu-
dents Welcome.
6: 30-Students' Discussion' Meet-
ii..
7:30--Worship andI Sermon. '"A
Wounided Spirit." 'Mr. Sayles.

se at Wvesley hal.
Epsilon dinner iroom

LANE; ]FALL

.1

Note. On Wednesday. Maiy 9, at
7:30, Dr. Joseph Taylor, suiperin-
tendent' of West China Missioan,
will speak in church parlors. A.
cordial invitation to the public.

See "Upper Roomn" Jlu1
and Printed Schedule
'Sundaiy Class 'for M1.enf
9:30 to 10:15

I

,

(Missoutri Synod)
Corner Third and Nest Ituron Sts.
CARL A. IMAUt.3, Pastor

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REV. A. if" STALKER, 1). I)., pastorI
MISS ELLEN W. DMOORE, Student Dilrector'
10:30 A. Al. MORNING WORSIP. Pastor's Subject: "THlE OPEN
MIND."
12:00 Noon. BIBLE CLASSES in WESLEIY IIALL.
5:3046:30 P: M. OPEN HOUSE in WEHSLEY HALL.
6:30 P. M. WESLEY.AN GUILD DEVOTIONAL MEETING. Leader:
MISS ELLU RA HARVEY.
7:30 P. M. EVENING' WORSHIP. Pastor's. Subjevt: "FEAR."
SPECIAL MUSIC: "Andantino" (Ce'sar Franck-Eddy), Mrs. Rhead;
"May the words of my Mouth" (Burleigh), the chorus choir; "Fear
not ye, oh Israel" (Spicker), the chorus choir; "My hope is in the
Everlasting" (from the Daughter of Jarius) (Stainer), Mr. Wheeler;
M1arch. (Wallis), Mrs. Rhead; "An Meer," (Schubert-Eddy), Mrs.
Ithead; "Oh Light Divine" (Kastalsky), the chorus choir; "Lowly
Kneel we in Contrition" (from Mors et Vita), (Gounod), trio; March
(Gigout), Mrs. Rhead.

r.

0: 30---German Service.
10:30-Bible School.
11:30-English Service.

Seri-on subject: "Cirlst's Voit~,fer-
satlen With marthim'v

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
DIVISION A NI HRON
REV. L. A. IAA RETTf, 1).D.), inister
LEWIS C. RE1ADkNi, sec'y Mead students
M ORNYING SEaRVICE
10:30
"THE, WAY OF SALVATION"
Inauguration of the new Young People's Cabinets
12:00-STUDEN::T CLASSES
Prof. W. D. Hcnderson and Dr. J. E. Kirkpatricl%
5:30-STUDENTS' SOCIAL HOUR
Friendshin)-Furl-Food
6:30-YOUNG PEOPLES' M;EETING
"4SHALL THE FUNDAMENTALISTS WIN'
A discussion growing out of the Fosdick-McCartney contr'over,,y
'' ~Thomas Dasef, '21)L, leader.

I

No Evening Service

Peach- Blue -- White

t ,

I

Materials

Poplin, Lingette,

Oxford and English

Cambric

Cloth

LANE HALL

I

,just. the right, shaped collar

"'THE STONE CHURCH WITH THE~ WARM WELCOME"
Herbert A. Jump, E. Knox Mi1tchell, lMary K. Ifillar, Staff.
~7A. XM.-Students Bible Class, led by Mr. Mitchell.
10:30 lA. M-Second sermon by Mr. Junmp in the Creed of Progressive

F. P. IARTHURVJ, Pastor

9:30 A. M.-Bible School.-Prof.
Barnhill1, superintendent.
12:00 M.-Student Classes in Lane

5:00 P. X.-'Evening Prayer anid Address by Mr. Webb, Subject "T 1e Ad-
ventures of ar Praayer.7 ,--

I

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