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March 15, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-03-15

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW,
TODAY.

Y

itA6

Ar
t

PLAN TO
ATTEND
CON VOCATION

VOL. XXXIII No. 120

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARIBOR MICHIGAN,, IIU1{SDAY, MARCH, 15, 1923 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

DAN6ER Of. WAR HANGS OVER
RUHR REGION1 INHABITANTS
THRlEATEN VIOLEINT ACTION

lie
in
a
t w

MIMES TO IVE PLASVRST EBTR EXPLAIN FATHERS' DAY' LEGISLA9TIVE PARTY
M\imies Iv ill give two one-act flays ReIlesentatives01fthe Fathers ' cly n ni i
.t WXednles( 'day nd hursday night,, committee of the Union spoke at lfra-r D
series of nid-week performances? night urging the various organizations
he (Glittering Gate", a fantastic fegauy' e Trio Will fleet Illinois Af- to reserve thc week end of May 11 and
aylet by lord Dunsany, and "tAll ff'ntniave.s Tomorrowy 12 for entertaining the fathers of men PLEA B [FORE
imnied Up", a short comedly, are the Night; in their own organizations.
presentations to be given. Spe- !____iIt was suggested that the fraterni-
al scenelry, desMigned nd ectei1 (vA1tr' *ht ) -..4n.1-.+ hn,.-W1 tia T _"* - -y

MiLL ARRIVE.
RTO N WIL L MAKE
IVISITORS TONIGHT
TALK BR IANES 1KEEP~S SOLON
IV' LANtiSING UN TI L
4 O'CLOCK
SEVERAL COMMITTEES
MAY STAY SATURDAY
U11101 anti Fraternitles to House 'is-
hors; Studepts to U'sher
at contoeation

,aVD A V lD1nVQPA'd%.1mV~Tm IUTA 'D'XI

OP APPROACINGh CRISIS
EN SITUATIONI
WESTPHAUIAN LABOR
UNIONS FAVOR BREAKj
Threaten Use of Line Dynamite to
, in Desired I
aesltsz
Reeknhniien, March II --By
A. P.)-Feneck military authori-
ties have or~dered residents of I
Duner. to remain indoors after 7 i
o'clock at night; all lights In the1
houses m~ust be efngulsled by 10I
'elock. During the day, men In I
thke streets or other public places
m~ust not put thir hands In their
pjockets. The burgomaster has; _

IVNIVERSItI'Y OF ILLINOIS
GETS GIFT OF $100,000
Danville, Ill., March 13.-Whaut
is believed to be one of the larg-
est individual gifts ever made to
the University of Illinois was
madle today by Mr. and Mrs. -Jo-
seph Carter of Rlankin, this coun-
ty, when they transferred 3~0
acres of land In Butler town-
Ship, worth $100,000, to the Uni-
versity.
The land is to be held in trust
by the board of trustees of the
university andl the income used to
assist worthy boys and girls
through college, loans to be made
after they have spent one year in
the university.

apipealIed to the people to remain
calm, if only for- the sake of the
.hostages, of whomn he-is one.
Berlitn. March 14'-(By A.P.)-
"Tlninder hag in the air. between
the Lippe and the Ruhr," writes the
Elberfeld correspondent of the Allg-
emndine Zeitung, "and if it ever breaks'
woe to the French and woe to all Eur-
The correspondent says that the W e-
stphalla~n is a elan of few words but
that when he does' begin to speak, ac-)'
tion is not fax off, and adds that un-1
.til recently the W estph alians have
k~ept their feeligs to themselves
"realizng that the whole country is;
swarming withi spies."
Inhabitants Threaten
The inhabitants of the Ruhr thec
correspondent declares have even gone
so far as threats which' is evident by
an' incident which he relates as fol-
lows:
~The la~bor unions at Bochum pro-
tested against the sharpening of the
state seige. The French commander(
invited th~em to th~e city hall to ex-
Blain their rason~s to him and to hear
vindication of his measures. There-
upon they inter'rupted. him declaring
that they did not care anythuing about
that and added, "We have borne. it
long enough; it will not go much long-
er and one thing is certain, for you,
general, it is turning out badly. Dc
not forget that weo have dynamite in
our mines. Remember that, and if it'
ever goes off, Good bye."

PROMINENT ALUMNI;
GALLERY PLANNED

by ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~V:ST stdnsoah aps i7 tl~El 1A(OT O4 n that week end. Fathers' day it
used for the two prodluctions. ' E~EETUYR I being sponsored by the Union as a
Tickets for the two performance. week end when a united effort will be
will go on sale Tues(d. y n the IkIimes Michigan's negative Varsity debat- i made to have the fathers of students
theater. ing team will leave this morning for here. Special entertainment is being~
Uirbana, Ill., where it will compete, arranged for the occasion and a defin-
OSMOP lT NST in thme eighth annual Md-,West debmate# ite program has been planned.
i wi~~~~~~~~~th the Illinois affirmative team to- Terpeettvswl pa fCM D O ig S I the remainder of the fraternities to-
mrrow ngt Prof. It K. Imnmel, of night and tomorrow night also.
acompany the team. Professor Immel
isintercollegiate contest director a
tepresent time. I RG
PI~ii ared ~i deill PrgriiaroiiThos(~e who leave this morning asill
Anninal l Sjrlng (Yalu- he contest are William Schricr, '24, .1E
niiaVHI B. Glasgow, '23, and C. J. Cole, '23. P~ rl l~
- ATIJTEIE Schrier, who is from Kalamazoo and
i ROIE~t DITE11h. 23.1, ,graduate of the Kalamazoo Central!
TO SING 4IROUP1 OF, SONG' !high2 schaool,,had considerable practice> Interpreter Reaads hiilder's (Comiedy,
Sn oratory and debating while attend-! "'k'Ie4 fil Talley", ill 11111
Cosmopolitan club will present itt ing high school and Kalamazoo col- 1Aidtoiumii
annual Spring Carnival at. 8 o'clock 'ege. Glasgow is from Spencer, Ia,!
tonight in hill audlitor'ium with fiver and graduated from the Spencer high ' DISPLAYS DRtAMATIC MASTERY
acts of vaudeville, musical and On- school in 1914. He is a member of, I lPR4NAIGAIIY
ental numbers. Trhe various national !Delta Sigma Rho, national honorary
clubs in the organization will each oratorical fraternity, Adelphi, andl won,
give an act. the extemporaneous speaking contest ]11 Thnias .I isk:e
The program will commence with a ;held in December, 1921, and an ora- I Displaying remarkable mastery in
musical number by the girl's mandolinF torical contest in 1922. Glasgow was his ability to impersonate various
club, and will lie followed by an act also a. member of the Varsity team
entitled "The Idol Dance" by Gordon which debated against the University characters, Phidelah Rice, master
Weir, '24, who has starred as an cc- of Wisconsin in the Mid-W~est dlebate reader, interpreted "Peaceful Valley,", ,.
centric dlancer several tinmes in dra-.!last year. Cole is from W\auseon, O, a most entertaining three-act comedy
fIttic productions. This will be a -ld is a graduate' of the Wauseonm high; by Everett E. Kidder, last night in
feature dance originated by himself school. He also has had cons 4d*rabale !Hill auditorium. The recital by Mr.
TFo Show Chinese Fashions xeinei ihsho eaig Rice was given as the secondl March
Act three, "The Chinese P'assing The contest is a triangular aiffairi! lecture one the Oratorical lecture
Show", will he given by the Chinese between the Universities of ichd- course.
students's club). It will l)C a style igan, Illinois, and Wisconsin and the The play, a simple uncomplicatedj
show and revue of the national cos- ;Schedumles have been so arranged that story of an honest, unsophisticated
tumes of that coaunatry in all different ,:; debate will be held at each of thej young man, true to his family and his
Iperiods of history The costumes fo " ,niversities tomnorrow night. The idleals, is laid in a small New Eng-
thii act wer'e. obtained by the (clu'- Wisconsin negative team will be here1 land town oil the edge of "Peaceful'
froma cmpay i Ne Yok. it that time to debate against theI Valley". It afforded the well-known
'Robert Dieterle, '23M, will sing sev- :Michigan affirmative team ni hill aau-ede neclln poruiyt
era slo inth nxtnumerwhchditoriuni. The conatest in Mladisona. give impersonations of the country
is entitled "An Hawaiian Night". Tanga Wis., will be between the Illinois neg- fl fta einadas e
1and.Tavares will. give a vaudeville en- ative group and the Wisconsin affirm-;floftarein nd ls Nw
tertainmuent in this number with sonic <ative team. I York city personages who wvere vis-
guitar stunts.' "Princess" Kakipaki hr ntevlae The question for the league contest Iiosi tevlae
;will complete this act with a genui- yethis Tat1'.t-audience Greaitly lleased
t eais is: Resolved, Ta ht
I mne hula hula (dance direct from lion- fiver. constituional cr' statutory, The aiction, centers around I-Josiaha
olulu. changes are nuecessary to make impos- Howe, the youth who wins his love,
#Dances on I'rugraiii sible thme use of injunctions in laborj his law suit and, in fact, to whom
To conclude the performance the disputes in the United States should 'almost every wishi is gratified. Mr.

Legislators Will
Hear Him Tonight

Will limingLY Paintings of
the Corridors
Union

of

ill

ENSOON TO BIE PLACED
Pictur'es of 22 prominent alumni
will be hung in the halls of the
Union. The work is to lie(done by the
recording department under the di-
rection of John Burge, '23.
The names of the alunmni whose
pictures will be placed, in thme Union
are: William R. Day, '70, William J.
Mayo, '83M, Stewart Edward White,'
'95, James R. Angell, '90, Edwin Den-
by, '96L, William L. Clements, '82,
Charles F. Brush, '69E,' Levi ;L. Bar-
boury '63, Arthur Hill, '65, Harry
Burns Hutchins, '71, Henry C,
Adams, '83, T. MF. Cooley, '73, William
W. Cook, '82L, Alfred Noble, '70E,
William-Graves Shiarpe, '81L, Earl ID.
Babst, '93, 'Lawwrence :Maxwell, '74,
Otto J. Klotz, '72E, Charles K. Adams,
'61, M. E Cooley, '85, Robert S. Wood-
ward, '72E, and Henry M. Bates, '90.
Of the alumni selected some re-

Members of the state legislature
will arrive here for their tour of the
University at 6 o'clock :tonight. They
were scheduled; to arrive one hour
::earlier, but they will renin in Larn-
sing until 4 o'clock in order to h1eat
t: MaJor Roy Haines, national prohibi-
lion commissioner, who has an ad-
.:::} , dress before the two houses scheduled
for 2:30 o'clock this afternoon.
The arrival of the legislative par-
ty -none hour later than it was plan-
ned, will also necessitate the time for
dinner in the Union being set over un-
til -7:15 o'clock. .
They will be, taken diretly from
the station to the Union instead of to
their assigned lodgings as was orig-
inally planned.. The reception corn -
mittees at the fraternities, will there-
fore not need to anticipate the arriv-
P~resident Hlion L~. Buiton al of their guests until about 10:30 o'-
Will address legislators tonight in ( clock tonight.,
the Union concerning the University ( May Stay Jrntil Sat1urdIay
uilding progiani Information received here yesterda~y
fIndicated that 'several committees of
- ___ _____~--I the twvo houses' will probaly renmaiV.
has 1 over until Saturday to hold meetings
lMfchigan.H s°1h) ere. In the event that there should
A mo n s ~ 1be an overflow of guests from thme Un-
0715Ol O1 ion tomorrow night, it is expected thlat
____~ - _______-___ they will be accommodated at the frai-
ternities, and aided by them ini their
Included anmong the legislators vc~ departure Saturday. It is believed
will visit, Ann Arbor today are 13 Uni- however, that the number staying 'ov-
versity of Michigan graduates, twc er tomorrow night will 'be compara-
from thme Senate and the remainingItieysal
nunmber from the house of Represent- The exact, number who wil miako
atives. This group contains doctors the trip is not yet certain~, )ut an
lawyers, an engineer and a 'literary estimate last night placed-the figre at
student., about 150, lncluiling Nwives~ of' the leg-
Lawyers. predominate,. eight beingj islators and attaches,. of- the_ twe
numbered among time men from Lan- houses.
sing. The men come, from University I -IBurton To Address Solorns
classes dating' as far, back as 1889' The address which will be delivered
while one of them only graduated in b rsdn Bro oiht tI z
1915. 1 pected, will be the most important de-
Heading the list chronologically if livered since the beginning of his ad-
Denias Dawe, '89H. Then comes Ger- ministration. He' Will take up in de-
ritt WV. Kooyers, '99L, folowed by Wil- tail time building needs, and offer facto
hiam 0. Lee, 'OOL. Lee was secre- intending to correct errors which, iP
tary' of time Webster literary society is alleged, have been current inth
while an undergraduate. James .Hen-- state during the past few' weeks. Mis-
ry, 100M, is also one of the membersi statements in the press espechily
of the legislative tour of. inspection, have been noted occasionally here.
The 1902 law class is'represented by Recently attention was dra~wnrto
George C. Watson. Peter B. Lennon flagrant falsifications appearing in a
'03L, captain of the law football team 'state tewspaper,' with the resulit tha~t
when in college,. will also be here, as the writer opend oue nte'a
will Donald C. Osborn, '04L, memberIacoinntep-
of Frars.per correcting .his errors.' Othe~r er-
'The class of 1908L, has two memibers rosr;i~ n"nsnain" f"r
of, the 1-ouse of Represenitatives I regularities", and' of v.1 911e'hints
Chester A. Ferris and Looniis K. Pres- concerning "hole:3 in the ground"
ton, while Albion B. Titus, '09L, will Imake up the text of imost "of the
also be here todlay. stories. It is unlikely that P1reiident
Concluding the list are Warren D Buton will deal directly with oily
Byrunm, '12, the only literary gradu." of these statements, but -his talk will
ate among the group, Howard F. Bax. include facts intended to refute er-
ter, '09E, amid William M. Connelly roneous Ideas concernin~g the' prio-
15L. gram..
{ Iotising Plans, Compllete

sl
,
ii
1
'
,

Latin-American club will present ai
Argentine tango number consisting
of many new and fancy dance steps
This is thme dance that Rudolph Val-
entino is teaching in this country, Miss
Hazel Carlton, t'oe dancer, will give
a specialty nuniber after time last act1
Tickets for the carnival will be or
sale on the campus and at Wahr'f
book store today at 50 cents apiecer
More than 2,000 had been sold up tc
last night.I

Ie immediately made."

Press
To

Prepares
Greet Yost

~''1

l~lacli14-(y A ceived honorary degrees as well as
Recklinghiausen, March 14-ee fro(By A.iou
P.)-Plans for operating, the govern- 1 eua ere fo h aiu
mient-owned coke plant at Wester- colleges. Four' of the alumni are de-
holt, near here, which has been taken ceased.
over by French authorities as part of
the scheme for' obtaining reparations g
were announced today. Members of the bIH CU P N 1C
w'ork in hand, are reported to have
made arrangepments to 'load into cars * Commiteemen in charge of the an-
15,000 tons 'of coke, taken with thej nual Varsity Glee clumb formal to be
pat'The first train of this coke has j given March 30 in the parlors of Bar-
started for France. bour gymnasium have been named.,
lake Use of Tanks and programs, decorations, and en-
Tanks were used in the operation, tertainnient for the dance have all
and a cavalry patrol has been placecl been provided. The entertainment for
around the plant; infantry "iuardr' the 'affair is to consist of quartette
have replaced the Germians, '400 of selections and novelty acts.
whom, quit work this morning. Four The conmmittee, which is to have
thousand miners in an adjacent coat hreo h alhstefloig
iia lso wnthe ocuptin'asaof thesokemembers: Il.M. Stephen, '24, chair-
bt eenan the sin ftie coke* man, C. ft. Jones, '23, E. W. Brown-
plant, bu vn hud' h trk on;b lbde, .'25, and W. I1. Nichols, '23.
tinue there is enough coal. on time sur-.
face to run the place for severalJh .Btos".o .Svn r
months.j chestra will play for the dance.
Assurances were given the Germanj Tickets for the af'fair are to cost
offcials by the French. that the coal $2 each, and are to be sold by the
mine woutld not b)e interferred, with members of the club.. No corsages
(Continued on Page Two) ; will be worn at tihe dance.
ChiesDeparts From Old
Potlicy InThneater Issue.-

i
,I

. wv

With Coach Fielding H. Yost's de-
parture last night for St. Louis, Mo.
newspapers in the west have already

COMMITJEE ANNOUNCED
FOB SOPHOMORE PROM

t
3

Members of the Sophomore Prorg
committee have all been chosen and!
made all but the -final arrangements
for the class- formial to bie held Marci' 4
23 at time Union. Trickets for time af-
fair have been sold, dec~~rations anc
programs have beemi ordered, ane
Snmith's orchestra of Kentucky has
signed a contract to play for the ball I
Irwinm F. Deister, '25, is chairnman ofj
the Prom committee by virtue of hiE
position as class social comipittec
chairman, and will lead time g'randh
marchi. The other nmembers of t he
committee are H-erbert' Steger, '25
Carl W. Bind, '25, Mark Duthield, '25
David Wills, '25A, Charles Merriam,
'25E, Richard Underwood. '25E, Eliza-
beth Maloy, '25, and Gladys Trow-
bridge, '25.
Luncheon is to lie served (during tlic-
intermission at thme(dance, which is tc
last from 9 to 2 o'clock. Time commit. 3
tee plans to give roses to the women
at thme affair. Arrangements for the3
parking of automnobiles wvill be mnad( ,
by the committee immediately and an -
nounced a~s soon as possible.
Kiraanis Chub D~oniates to ilospital
Members of time Kiwainis club of Ann
Arbor have mraisedl a fund of $100 wvhich,
has been p~resentedl to thme social serv-
ice dlepartment of time University hios-
pital. Time money wiii be used to hu3
books.
4 .Compe tiioni

Started to herald his. four' weeks trip
to time Pacific coast with praise and
conimendation for the "Old Man".
The Rocky Mountain' News, of Den-
ver, Colo., in saying that the famous
Yost snmile' will arrive in Denver ear-
ly Monday, M\arch 19," gives an entire
outline of his coaching work with his
recor'd at Michigan, and tells of elab-
orate preparations that the local alum-
ni body and high school afie making,
to welcome him to the west.
Of his Michigan football careen it
says, "Since his arrival at that school
In 1901 Michigan has turned out more
All-American players and won a lang-
er percentage of games played than
any other university in the countr'y
In the 12 times that lie and his hus-
kies have tried for the Western Con-
ference title Yost has carried home thc
banner at six times mnd divided hon-
ors with another school twice, a, rec-
ord that is unique in itself. Yost's
reputation as a coach is international
and his friends say that it is because
he is known as a clean player in ev-
ery way."

Rimce makes this character li1Ve. I-jo-i
siah's slow drawl, his irony end his
clever attempt at witticism 'is exce'p-
tionally well dlone. Even his actions
Smake time character more 'realistic.
Hosiah's mother, a. lovable, hospita-
ble and unselfish old soul always -on
hand to aid a suffering human be-
ing, is characterized by Mr. Rice-in a
most human manner. .
Several of time minor characters in-,
x eluding Jonathan Ford, the pessimzis-
ftic, feeble inn keeper,,,and, Jack Barn-
; hart, the suitor ,for the hand of Ho-j
swah's desire; were impersonated in
a ,way that completely illustrated the
reader's unlimited knowvledge of his
profession and thme technique of his
art. Time purpose and message of the
1 play was brought out with careful.
judgment on the par't of the inter-
preter.
Gives Encores
fThe large audience present last
night showed their appreciation of
Mr. Rice's recital by calling him back
I several times. Hle was forced to give
two short :selettions, time first of
3 vhich was a comical monologue writ-
tcen by Mark Twain imm which the
speaker' is a hiard(y old Rocky Moun-
tain settler. It was extremely well
received and was followed. by thme
reading of "If I H-ad Time", a poem
-written by am professor in the Uni-
versity of Minnesota. This concluded
tihe exceptionally pleasing program of
the nationally-'known imp(,rsonator.

l
l
i
1
I
,
s
:
i
r
I

Meet Illinois Debaters Friday

1 PlansI~ I"R~ for housing, the visitors were
FORBANNUALMAY PARTYRAOCLIFFE COLESE GETS
Arhiecs'May, paty apphcmtion E WOMA PRESIDENT
il~ml be given out frm~ 1 to 5 o'clock NE
Tuesday and Wednesday afternmoons at
theUnin. im paty s t b fonma ICambridge, March 14-(Bly A. J,~
SndeiUnonbe heldpay 11s toefrmathe The election of Miss Ada' Louise
ati .is o iehed My 1 ude th ,Comstock, dean of Smith college, 'as
auspices of the colic-ge of architecture. I president of Radcliffe college'was uli-
Earl Lundin, '23A, is chairman of time; nounced today. She will he the first
ticket committee. ! full time president of Rladcliffe, sic-
Commpetitive contests for a program; ceeding Le Baron R. Biriges, wvho
a I for 20 years has been head of Rzid-
and a decorations design in wrhich all cl n eno im aut it
architects coumpete through' -their' I and senc ean 'at hearcar tyuniersy
j Mlasses are now undler way. The win- adsine ~ avr n vriy
ner of each contest will be given a free Miss' Comistock,, who wag formerly
ticket to time (hance. Th~e cost: of tick- dlean of women at, the University 'or
ets is $6.; Minnesota., will assume offce in' June.
Mason and Dixon orchestra from Miss Coni stock since 1921 has been
K lentiicky, which played at thme fop president of the American Associa-
this year, have been asked by the cone- tion of University Women. As the
mittee to play, and are expectcd to ac- E first dean of women at Minnesota,
cept the comumittee's offer. The pro-j Miss Comstock was credited with pio-
,ram for the party includei luncheon i neer' wort, in bringing to the fore the
ind favors in addition to the r'egulai- importance of college education for
'eatures of the danice.I
women.

It vas rathier a departure from the sums up thme activities of the dramatic
general policy of Chimes to publish' organizations in a way that will be In- i
tbe "'Theater issue" that they dlid yes- teresting--to time members them-i
teda.Th te n eprin ro'selves.
ierdy. Te ~ep i deprtig trim ,The prize winning story again ap-
the mnediocire and overplayed events 0 pears under a noni de plume. it is a4l
commorn'capUt life' conies as a shock rather' clever stony, called "Futility".
and a rather pleasureable shock at I The frontispiece of thme collection of
that. Whether-the issue fulfilled the a full house of time follies beauties is
purpose that it was directed toward W exceedingly interesting; yes, exceed'
a inatter of_ conjecture, but it was 2 ingly so. B~ut is it necessary? Do we-
delightful relief at any rate. have to go to New York for saniples
Thre artieles on the whole are good £ of feminine beauty?
It 'is 'liii these that the issue reacher ;Shwcial Appeal to Greeks
its mlairn glory, for it is through them ! The other articles, as before stated
that the theatrical side is presenited tare goodl. "Fraternities at Michigan" -
Avery Hopwood, '05, famed as ,a writ- ; will prove of interest to a niember of'
er of bedroom farces, cointributes r1t ime Greek letter clan especially, for
rambling dissertation that starts nio- he will therein be able to find a recoreQ -
where and ends at the samue place. But of his fraternity's history, and wila'
it is by Avery I-iopw od, and it is well Iis; more imnteresting than read of
written, so that the magic lure of famre ' one's self? A sports article, by Wal-

A proven necessity in pres-
ent business industry, has built
up the city of Ann Arbor. This
may lie true, b~ut if' you have
your doubts, see thme classified

Professor Hobbs Ill;
Prof. William H. Hobbs of thme geol-
ogy (departmnent was unable to meet
his classes yesterday dlue to illnesst
lHe has a bad cold, with sonic fever
and will be confined to his bed for a'
least time rest of the week, according
to a statenment miadle by Mrs. iHolb:
yesterday afternoon.

I TANK ME N ENAtOTT TOI
I MJJyET, REACHf CHICAGO
I I
( Special to The Daily)
I Chicago, Ill., Mar. 14.-The
# Michigan five man swimming I
Iteam arrived here tonight ready

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