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October 05, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all
news dispatchescredited to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier' or mail, $3.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, g6o.
Communications not to exceedSs words
if signed, the signature not necessarily to
appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
left at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
does. not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-HW

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAi

have been out of the question a few
years back.,
For instance, imagine the ruinous
effect which would be produced if a
piece of delapidated fruit, emanating
from the unsteady hand of an en-
raged spectator, should strike one of
the delicately colored shades. Or con-
jecture the tragedy if . a riotous
crowd of victory worshippers should
sweep through the theater leaving a
broken trail. of artistically covered
seats in its wake. These occurrences
might have happened ten years ago.
The patrons of then were prone to be
a trifle rough, and the plainest furni-
ture was installed by the manage-
ment to make the loss as slight as
possible.
But our conduct is improving, as is
admirably reflectedin the new and
artistic tea-rom furnishings of the
local movie show in question.

i

OASTD ROLL
ROLL OUT WEST
HALL:

1

THE WEST HALL AFFAIR
Just the other day th.e Regents
took a deep breath and decided to
eliminate West Hall. The old theme-
embalmery is to be razed. The last
stand of the rhetoric department is
stricken . . Oh, woodmen spare that
tree-no, that was another time.
Well anyway, little recked they
what they did. It is a simple thing to
eliminate a buildipg-but where to
eliminate it to! Ah, there is the
question. Before the University sen-
ate takes rat poison over the problem
a d the President's titian locks pale
let us spring into the breach. Here
is our golden thought for today:
Move West Hall over into the Mu-
seum!

OUR SHARE OF PLAYS
From year to year in the past
plaints were registered among
Arborites and the University

com-
Ann
body

MANAGING EDITOR'
MARION B. STAHL

City Editor ..........James B. Young
Assistant City Editor-..........Marion Kerr.
Editorial Board Chairman-....E. R. Meiss
Night Editors-
Ralph Byers harry Hoey
J. Y. Dawsoni, Jr. J. E. Mack.
i,..i. Hershdo.rfer R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donahue
Sports Editor-............F. H. McPie
Sunday Magazine Editor.....Delbert Clark
Women's hLditor...............Marion Koch
Hiumor Editor-------------Donald Coney
Conferene Editor- ..-......H. B. Grundy
Pictorial Editor--.....- ...Robert Tarr
Music Editor. .. .......E. H. Ailes
Assistants

M. II. Pryor
Dorothy Leunnetts
Maurice le;man
R. A. Millington
W. . Butler
H. C. Clark
1\. I,. 'uuable
Evelyn I. Comghlin
Lugene Carmichael
be; nadette Cote
Wallace F. Elliott
T. E. Fiske
Maxwell Fcad

John Garlinfzhouse
Imabel Fisher
Winona A. Hibbard
Samuel Moore
T. G. McShane
W. B. Rafferty
W. R. Stoneman
Virarinia Tryon
P. M. Wagner
A. P. Webbink
Franklin Rickman
Joseph Epstein
Jf. W. Ruwitch

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising ............John J. Hamel, Jr.'
Advertising . .........dward F. Conlin
Advertising........ Walter K. Scherer
Accounts-......-......Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation ..... .,..David J. M. Park
Publication.L. Beaumont Parks
- Assistants

Townsend IH. Wolfe
Kenneth Scick
GeorgetRockwood
Perry M. Hayden
Eugene L. Dunne
NVn. ('raulich, Jr.
Joh~n C. Haskcin
Ia, vey K. Reed
C. 1,.. Putnam
I. D. Armantrout
H. WV. Cooper
Wallace Flower
Edw. B. Riedlc
Parold I, . 1le

Alfred M. White
anir P. Roesser
Allan S. .Morton
James A. Dryer
Wm. 11. Good
Clyde I~ Hagerman .
A. liartwell, Jr.
T. Blumenthal
I3 Jowar d Hayden
W. K. Kidder'
Henry Freud
I:erbert P. Bostwick
L. Pierce

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1922
Night Editor-JOHN P. DAWSON, JR.
TOWARDS ATHLETIC JUSTICE
Critics ~ of college athletics agree'
that too much emphasis is being plac-
ed on such sports as baseball and
football, and perhaps basketball. Sup-
porters of college athletics are al-
most willing to argue that too much
emphasis on, any one is impossible. But
no one can doubt that.this popularity
has dwarfed into insignificance such
sports as wrestling, soccer, hockey,
and swimming, any one of' which is
a good sport and worthy of recog-
nition. Yet sports of various kinds
ought to be on the same basis-ex-
cellence in one form of athletics
should be as much respected as ex-
cellence in any other branch espe-
cially when equal skill is required
by both.
The sports usually included in the
division labeled "minor" are neces-
sarily differentiated from -major
sports because of the influence of
public interest; but even public in-.
terest ought not to be so catered to
by colleges that such sports as hock-
ey, swimming, soccer, and cross coun-
try should be left beyond the pale of
student support. The ideal for col-
lege athletics is "Athletics for all,"
and this ideal necessarily implies that
all forms of exercise should be pro-
vided in order to suit each man's
aptitude.
This means that minor sports need
encouragement. Each of them, in its
e:rlier years, needs fostering care,
and this care should be provided.
Even if some of the glory of the
betterdknown sportseis taken away,
it deed not be cause for apprehen-
sion. Such sports are too well-es-
tablished to cause worry. The minor
ones are not. Give them the encour-
agement they need, and the circle of
athletic devotees will continually
widen, until, perhaps, every man will
have his own interest.
EVOLUTiON RIGHT AT HOME
That the Michigan man of today is
a more polished, peace loving indi-

concerning the superfluity of third
rate musical comedies and melodra-
mas "reachng the local stage, and the
scarcity of worth while productions
befitting the type of audience com-
monly found in Ann Arbor.
.Those days, it seems, have passed.
Last year a number of the finest
contemporary dramas were presented
here with the original casts, and be-
ginning tonight another year of great
Irtists in great plays has been sched-
uled by the local theater.
Ann Arbor now has no further com-
plaint forthcoming. For a community
her size she is reaping her share dra-
matically. It is now up to Ann Arbor
to suport the right kind of drama to
such a full extent that its perform-
ance here will be firmly established
for the fture._
NO CAUSE FOR WORRY
'A scientist recently announced that
this earth of ours was made- of a jel-
ly-like consistency which might go to
pieces at any time. His statement
caused considerable alarm. among
those who are wont to take such fore-
tellings seriously. But a moment's
honest reflection will dispell all
gloom.
As far as we know, at least for the
past six thousand years, things in the
planetary world have been doing
their business in an orderly way. The
sun has been rising and setting on
schedule and the moon has regulated
the tides all right and things on the
whole have beenhperformedvery de-
pendably. So that despite the prog-
nosticating of gloomy scientists the
old earth, sun, moon, stars, and sat-
telites have won and deserve our im-
plicit confidence.
M$OTHER EPIDEMIC SUBSIDED
'Society ever favors the novel un-
til the novelty has worn off, and then
only- real quality can save it from
oblivion. This is especially well
evinced ty the short-lived popular-
ity the radio craze enjoyed. After a
y enthusiastic welcome at its
)irh, the radio is fast passing from
popular favor. Rust and cobwebs re-
place the fingerprints which formerly
covered the adjusting pieces.
Probably now that the public is de-
manding fewer supplies in this line,
the manufacturing companies which
a few months ago bent all their ef-
forts to secure the largest possible
production in the shortest time will
de'vote their energies to further en-
la'rging the existing knowledge of
this phenomenon of the ether and to,
improving the equipment now in
use. When quantity is not demand-
ed, quality usually increases.
USING AN "1" AT OHIO
A project now under way for a
block "M" at the Ohio State game
brings up any number of considera-
tions which should make students
heartily endorse the undertaking.
At the Oho Stategane between
ten and twenty thousand Michigan
students will be present. This will
fill a fair sized niche in the crowd of
some sixty thousands, which is ex-
pected at the dedication of the new
stadium.- What more inspiring sight
could there be for players, the alum-
ni who come from all sections of the
country to witness the combat, and
for the student body, than to see
'amid th myriads of Ohio spectators
the big human "M" alive with Mich-
igan rooters?
The cost of a block "M" is com-
paratively small. The effect is truly
inspiring. The fact that M ichigan has
never before had an "M" on a foreign
field should be no obstacle. Neither

hap she ever before expected so many
of her men to see an outside game.
Hat manufacturers are said to have
v'oiced their opopsition to the so-
called "collegiate" shaped hat. Per-
haps they do this because of aesthetic
motives,-but let's see, the older a
collegiate hat, the more style.

MY ROOM-MATE
My room-mate has a picture onI
desk;
But I have none on mine.
I have the looks the same as he-
But I haven't got the line!
My room-mate has new clothes

his

EDITORIAL COMMENT
YOUR BEST FRIEND
(The Daily Princetonian)
Some $ay a man's best friend is a
girl; some say a horse or a dog;
some say a pipe. But for real com-
fort, comradeship, and durability all
fickleness and instability of the oppo-
these are surpassed by a book. The
site sex is proverbial,-"Varium et
mutabile semper femina." A dog or
a horse can offer splendid companion-
ship for a while, but are but mortal.
Even the most treasured pipe has to
be retired from active service after a
few years of constant use.
College is the place to form friend=
ships. And it is no less important for
a man during his four years in Prince-
ton to get on speaking terms with the
people who live in the printed pages
as with those who live in the Univer-
sity dormitories. Making the right
club is a trivial matter compared with
making the right selection of books.
The one is a matter . of two short
years. The other, is a matter of a
lifetime. Much of the thought and at-
tention devoted to the former might
well be put on the latter.
While a inan is in college the chief
difficulty seems to be to find time
enough to accommodate the various
interests. It is hard to realize that
some day it may be even mere difficult
to find interests enough to while away
spare time. The picture of the blase'
undergraduate is mythical, but the.
picture of the ennuied business man is
true. Foreign critics say that Ameri-
cans do not know how to relax, that
when we are not rushing about we are
restless and, 41 at ease.
It is practically impossible for a
man who loves to read to be at a loss
for something enjoyable to do. He has
at his call innumerable loyal friends.,
He can rise above mere time and space
and the grating discord of the mo-
ment. Infinite beauty is at his com-
mand.
The Value bf acquiringp a taste for
good books cannot be overestimated.
The man who leaves Princeton with-
out the passionate dcsire to read more,
to learn more, has missed the most
valuable thing in college. The Uni-
versity Libray-u.-the book shelves at

Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oc
a.m., 7:oo am., 8:oo a.m., 9:05 a.m. and
lhouzrly to 9 :05 P.M.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m., and every two hours
to 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7:oo a.m. and ev-
ery two hours to 9 :oo p.m., n :oo pmm. To
Ypsilanti only- t:4o p.m., 115 a.m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m., 1210
p. tn.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo - Limited cars
3:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at 8:47
p).m~.

to

wear;
But mine are last year's style.
For I can't kid the tailor-
HE gets them with his smile!
My room-mate' goes to dances, too;
They surely treat him sweet.
Well, I could be a hit there, too-
But I have such clumsy feet!
Yet there's one place I get even,
As sure as sure can be;
I have a damn good room-mate;
He hasn't-he's got me!
SHE-GUN-DAH.
ALL HAIL Calig! And if you saw'
a sign in a restaurant which said,
"Wanted-A woman 6 to 11," would
you assume that the odds were against
her? THE HALIBUT.
Speaking of Restaurants
Sign before Thayer street restau-
rant:
40c Dinner 40c
Cheap at that for a-forty cent din-
ner in Annarbor.

,:

I

I

1922
S
1
8
15
22
29

M
16
23
30

OCTOBER
T W T
3 4 5
10 11 12
17 18 19
24 25 26
31

Fr
6
20
27

1922
S
Sr.
14
21
2S

LI fff4ff

"Karolyn
Kitc hen"
Formerly
The Delicatessen Shop
119 E. LIBERTY

for all Colleges
at lioth Stores

TEXT BOOKS and SVPPLIES

Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When
you want a hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned insde out
with all new trimmngs are like new.
We also make and sell POPULAR
PRICE' and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar or more on a hat. We give
values and quote prices which cannot
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere*

This Shop Is Now Under New
It has been named after Emily Iarolyn, one of
Washtenaw County's Pioneer Settlers. She was
known for miles' around for her skill as a cook.
However only the immediate family, friends, and
guests ever enjoyed her cooring. But the famous
recipes of Emily Karolyn have been preserved and
through the "Karolyn Kitchen" the public at large
will be given an opportunity to enjoy the cooking
of that dear old lady.
Old-fashioned doughnuts, cakes, pies, and every-.
thing good, - yes, and we nearly forgot to mention
those oatmeal cookies.
IN ADDITION TO BAKED GOODS

GRAHAM

SOME GUYS typewrite
With both eyes open-.
But we shut all ours
And just keep hopin'.
urch.

'-' y , -aetse. Trry us for your next nat.
the University store and the BrickO
Row Shop are to cheap movies and FACTORY HAT STORE
cheap magazine fiction as gold is to
brass. Men who neglect their best 617 Packard Street Phone 1792
friends will be the poorer in the long (Where D.U.R. Stops at State Street)

Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

L

WHAT STRUCK TOUR EYE TODAY
Professor without his faithful col-
lie. ZEKE.
ANN# ARBOR MOONS
There are two kinds of moons-com-
mon, plebean moons and Ann Arbor
moons. Ordinary moons are strange-
ly uninteresting and not at all clev-
er. They do either the expected or
the unexpected with monotonous reg-
ularity. True, they occasionally kin-
die words that burn, but wan is the
flame and ancient.
Ann Arbor moons are. not as these.
At times they display a cleverness
positively human, almost simian.
They behave with Odyssic cunning.
They are extremely inspirational. To
their diabolic humor must be credit-
ed a greater number and a higher
class of oaths than the better efforts
of the Dean's office.
Ride high, Ann Arbor moon! Smile
down on William and Virginie; give
them to drink of your heady wine
(Volsteadless percentage) until she
look like Astarte Regia and he takel
on the godhead that is Wallie Reid,'
and they feast on hair as on ambro-
sia.
Fling your darts at her eyes, and
burnish Wilfliam's 50-cent scarf-pin
'til it gleam like the gems of Or-
phir.-And then, just as your beams
rouse a passion in his breast, drop
out of the heavens with a loud plop,
six hours ahead of schedule!
TOMAS A. CELANO.
heard in the Press Room
"Gee, t' boss' cut his lip on t' new
towel."
"Wot-one one of t' new linen tow-
els?"
"Yeah, guess they must be Irish
linen."
Little Bulls On Great Papers
"HEALTH SERVICE HEAD CALLS
SEASONABLE DISEASE HARM-.
LESS."
"WILL INFORCE AUTO LAW'
AFTER MEETINK TODAY."
"ANN ARBOR CREAMERY FRED;
CAKES."
- Our Own Daily.

run.
WHAT 15 SA GENTL4EMAN
(The Daily Nebraskan)
In F. Scott Fitzgerald's latest nov-
el, The Beautiful and Damned, one of{
the most enjoyable passages of the'
wholly good book is a series of defini-
tions he gives of a gentleman. They
form, in the book, a conversation be-
tween a group of somewhat intoxicat-
ed characters but nevertheless present
a number of interesting views.
Here are the various interpreta-
tions of that often misused term, "gen-
tleman:"
A man who never has pins under
his coat lapel.
A man who prefers the first edition
of a book to the last edition of a news-
paper.
A man's social standing is determin-
ed by the amount of bread he eats in
a sandwich.
A man who never gives an interpre-
tation of a dope-fiend.
An American who can fool an Eng-
lish butler ilito thinking he's one.
A man who comes from a good fam,
ily and went to Yale or Harvard or
Princeton, and has money and dances
well, and all that.
Mention is then made of Abraham-
Lincoln's statement that a gentleman
is one who never inflicts pain.
We won't attempt to define a gentle-
man. That is entirely without our
sphere. We believe, however, that
Fitzgerald has -presented some ideas
well worth your consideration. They
sound rather shallow at first hear-
ing, but think them over.

FOR EXPERT
Pen Repairing
RIDER'S PEN SHOP
308 S. State St.
24 hOUR SERVICE - FAIR PRICES
4~

WE SPECIALIZE IN

LIGHT LUNCHES, SALADS, AND
SANDWICHES
Come and enjoy some of our deliciously appetizing foods

ANN ARBOR CUSTOM SHOE FACTORY
THIRTY MINUTE SERVICE
Get your repair work done when you
you want it.
Thirty minute service. Shoes called
for and delivered at the
H. W CLARK, 534 Forest Avenue
Phone 3043 j
ANN ARBOR CUSTOM SHOE FACTORY

TO SECURE

Ted Rhodes
Orchestra

"Karolyn

Kitchen"

119 EAST LIBERTY

CALL 2969=R

MOOR

1

II

The best in town

Permanent Groups

1 922-J-HOP

FOR CONVENIENCE
(The Wisconsin Cardinal)
Co-eds living in one of the main
dormitories at Northwestern univer-
sity are to receive their mail before
attending 8 o'clock classes. The pur-
pose of the change is to relieve the
girls from the tension of waiting until
noon for their letters from home,
which as heretofore made them inat-
tentive in class. We think the hard-
hearted faculty might also serve them
their breakfast in bed, but why
shouldthere be so much tension if
they are only waiting for letters
from home.
Harding to Return Home
Mt. Gilead, O., Oct. 4.-President
Harding expects to return to the,
scene of his birth and boyhood days
on his retirement from the White
House. This was the belief today
after French Crow postmaster at
Marion and personal friend of the
President, acting in behalf of the
chief executive, had bought the old

ZIERER
ARNOLD
CHON

IIONEYCHITSCHI
ROXBURGHI
JUSTER
BRUCE

WATKINS
CORBETT
VA UPRIE
CLANCY
BENNETT
DARLING
TAUPRE
CLANCY
SWEET
NISSLE
BOXER
MILLER
AKIN
NIEDZIELSKI

BORCHERS
HAMMILL
WANAyIAKER

CHEPEL
DAVIS
STILES
GREEN
RAN SOMW

LITTIETON
CURTIS
WESTON
BECKTAN
FREYBURG

Our Orchestras are Now Arranged.
Secure Your Music Early if You Want

Frosh, at the Library-Where
I get some information about
works of Ibid?

can
the

THE

BEST

We said to him, "Have you ever
been out to Barton Mills Country
club?"

DON'T WAIT 'TILL THE LAST WEEK
And you won't have to worry during the

He said, "Yes."

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