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March 03, 1923 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-03-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPEB OF THE
UNITVESITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning oxcept Monday
during the University yeartby the Board in
Centrol of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association,.
The Associated Press is exclusively en.
titled to the use for republication of all
news dispatches credited to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.

time make it enjoy them and clamour mid. Thermostats seem utterly to
Lor more. Suchna man is Harold fail, after a long winter of more or
Lloyd, the cinema comedy star who less faithful but totally unappreciat-I
sprang into prominence almost over ed service, and, apparently utterly dis-
night sevral years ago. couraged With a winter's maledictions
Harold Lloyd's type of comedy is upon their heads, they revengefully,
a most wholesome and refreshing de- refuse to function. Radiators begin
parture from the well known slap. to pop, as if to say, "For three
stick humor with which movie pa- months you have been raving about
trons have been confronted for a l heat; now you've got it!' Hell hath
number of years. His humor is orig- no fury like a thermostat scorned.
inal, distinctly different from that of But all this is merely to call at-
any other of his contemporaries on tention to the fact that classrooms
the screen, and it is of the type that in spring are often too warm for goodI

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EDITORIAL COMMENT
('OMMER~IALIZING TIlE PhARAOh
# aily Iowan)
Before an since the day King Tu-

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LAST EDITION OF

M IGAN

SONG

BOOK

tankhamen was laid away in his tomb
in the Valley of the Kings, Egypt has
ever been a whet to the imagination.
Since time immemorial this land has
tinged the actions of men. Joseph and
Moses knew it; Alexander the Great
sighed for more of its like; Mark An-
tony and Julius Caesar there learned
the charm of the East. Napoleon and

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BOTH STORES

Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
M.ichigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
nard Street.
Phenes : Editorial, 2414' and 176-M; Busi
biess, 96o.
Communications not to exceedS00wordsI
If signed, the signature not necessarily to
appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
Jeft at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
...-...a:. -;11 rrr iv nn e -.

appeals to the best side of human
nature.

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But best of all, there is a point
to his comedies. Lloyd's two latest,
pictures, "Grandma's Boy", and "Dr.
Jack", were both classic examples of
how a movie audience may be enlight-
ened and entertained at the same time.
Both of these pictures brought out
important psychological facts in a

scholastic work. Cooler classrooms,'
every student will admit, is an easy
remedy for drowsiness and stupor in
the spring.
TASTED OLLV
IT IS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE
SPRING HAS CAME
The little galosh that tramped thru

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his army stood before the pyram:ds in
awe and reverence; even so the Papy-
ri discoveries may shed light on the
Egyptian version of the deluge and
the Aten heresy with the possibility
of opening up a literary field as fer-
tile as the Trojan war once was.
But the only aspect of the late dis-
coveries in Egypt is not the inspira-
tional, unfortunately. Unprotected by
a curse, as Shakespeare is, King Tu-
1 f l Ihnm iI lino uccii lit lc l d a l

.y
;,?,,

signed communicaiors willrivent a-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned mne oetrann ia u ui
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily ences scarcely realized they were be-
dots not necessarily endorse the sentiments u given valuable information.
txpessd i. te cmmuicaion. - To such an artist as Harold Lloyd i
Sis the nation owes much, for men
telephones 214 and 17-M with creative genius are rare in--j
-h re edeed. May the future see more like
MANAGING EDITOR him.
MARION B. STAHL.
ON SUNDAY WTE READ)
NewsEditor.................Paul Watzel The modern press has formed the
Lity Editor.............James B. Young
Aistant City Editor..........-. A. Bacon abit of saving all the sensational
Editorial Board Chairman...... E. R. Meiss nesoIh ekfrteSna
Night.ditors-n o the week ste Sunday
Ralph Byers Harry Itey issue, a supplement containing most-
A. J. Arshdorfer R. C. Moriarty h
1. A. Donahue J. ;. Mack
Sports Editor.......Wallace V.F. Elott pers do have Sunday sections that
Women's Editor..............Marion Koch possess ,eThemterrysserisrmtdthe
ti) (ay Magazine F ditor. 1-. A. lonahie psesra ltrr.eit u hs
Pictorial Editor.... ... .Robert Tarr isare exceptions.
MusicEditor..........aC ........E. H. Ailes Recently the famous dancer, Isay-
NighttoEiators-rd
Lowel Kers Marc He dora Duncan, burst forthnito print
e.l. Ker Maufr . riceBrman ndlertdtah Cranp-
Eugene Carmichael and also denunciations against the!
AssistantsI people of this country who are so!
Thelma Andrewin Ronald HalgriiK I prudish and obsolete as to believe that
Stanley I. Armstrong Franklin D .Hepburn
tanley M. Bauter Winona A. Hibgard the marriage ceremony is one of the

Lose somethizg? A classified in
classified ad will sell it for you.--Adv.
. I
DETROIT UNITED LINE$
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(E'astern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-
6:oo a.m., 7:00 a.m., S:oo a.rn., :05
a.m. and hourly to 9:05 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops
west of Ann Arbor)--9 :47 a.m., and
every two hours to 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7:oo a.m.
and every two hours to 9:oo p. m.,
S i :oo p.m. To Ypsilanti only-1 1:40
p.m., 1:15 a.m..
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bcund--7:5o a.m.,
12 :1top.l.
To -Jackson and Kalamazoo-Lira-
ited car, 8:47, 10:7 a.m., 12:47, 2:47,
S 4:47 P..
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at
8:47 p.m.

I

SLEEP ANYWHERE, , BUT
EAT AT REX'S
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 Arbor Street
Near State and Packard Streets
ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
Schedule in Effect Octoberx.8, 1922
Central Time (Slow Time)
D X X T)
il.M. A. M. P.M. P.M
3:45 7:45A....Adrian ... 12:45' :45
}:i5 8:-15 ... Tecumseh ... 12:15 8:is
4:30 8:30 ... Clinton .... 12:oo 8:oo
5:15 9:15 .. Saline .... 11:15 7:15
5:45 0:d; Ar \nn ArborLv. 10:45 6:45
Chamber of Commerce Bldg.
D-Daily. X-Daily except Sundays
and Holidays. Friday and Saturday special
bus for students leaves Adrian 1:45, leives
Ann Arbor 4:45.
JAMES II. ;BLIOTT, Proprietor
lPhone 46

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STEWARDS and
HOUSE MANAGERS
OF
FRATERNITIES
AND
'SORORITIES
For the convenience of your
members why not start a charge
account with the
"WHITE SWAN"

tankhamen has peen nteratt yjazzei
the snow
out of his grave. Reverence and the
Unbckldth sn wsValley of the Kings have parted com-

GUIE e noae W
Has been cast aside in a c
may.

For the co-eds cry "These
days."
The little spring coats in
appear
To, tell the rest of us Sprin;
Look ye 'round theucampus
day
You'll see our co-eds.
Spring array
With coats wide open and
ing free,
Has old man weather bee
thee?

4
t
{{
IE

ry of dis- pany. Now comes the word that his
mummified body is not to be remov-
.epn ed until a few months have again
are sprig elapsed so that scandal and murder,
may be for a few days aigain later on
all glory supplanted by all manner of tales of
g is near. egyptology illustrated with lifted cuts
most anyjof former pharaohs.
American designers are following,
hard upon the Paris modistes in the
scramble for the rights to King Tu-
tankhamen's styles, As soon as suf-
scarfs y ficient information regarding jewelry'
n tricking and ornaments of thirty-five centuries
ago has been compiled the modern
gem business will be due for a revo-
lution Even advertisers have seized
a upon the king with a greedy grasp.
saystWise As an example we cite the makers of
Luxor silk who have already grabbed
the opportunity to flaunt their wares
while interest in the word runs high.
Beyond a doubt the Bell Telephone
company and Elgin watchmakers will
follow suit soon for their classic wares

I

1,,II

1923

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Dorothy Bennetts
Sidney Bielield
R. A. Billington
Helen Brown
H.. C. Clark
A.,"B. Connable
Bernadette Cote
Evelyn I. Coughlin
Joseph Epstein
T E. 1Fiske
John Garlinghouse
Walter 'S. Goodspeed
portm Goiilder

Edward J. Higgins
Kenneth C. Kel ar
Elizabeth Liebermann
John McGinnis
S-imuel Moore
M. H=. Pry of
W. B. Rafferty
Robert G. Ramsay
Campbell Robertson
J. XW. Ruwit h
SoIl J. Schnitz
Frederic G. Telmos
Philif I'J. Waaner

basic principles of human : society.
Miss Duncan, in her article which
appeared in one of the Sunday pa-
peres, made the statement that it
would be a good thing for humanity,
to rotate the baby crop in much the
same manner as the potato crop isE
rotated because women with hus-I

"Never stop to think, a
the middle of the street,"
Kracks.
"Are you a robber?"
"No, I'm a. member of cc
"Oh, - well."

SPRING
IHAT S
i .i v F t NOW
s R EADY
Our $3.00 and $3.50 Hats
GUARANTEED
We Save You a Dollar or
More on a Hat
We do all kinds of Cleaning
and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for HIGH CLASS
- WORK.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Strect Phone 1792
Where D. U. R. Stops at State

E -
I C E rC EA M

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960

i

BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER

Advertising.............John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising..............Walter K. Scherer{
Advertising............Lawrence IL. Favrot
l'bfication...............Edward F. Conlir:
Copywriting.... .. .David J. 1. Park
Circulation........ .....Vownsend 11. Wolfe
Accounts.:..............L. Beaumont Parks
Assistants
Kenneth Seick Allan S. Morton
George Rockwood James A. Dryer
Perry M. Hayden Wm. H. Good
Eugene L,. Dunne Clyde L. Hagerman
Wm. Graulich, Jr. Henry Freud
John C. Hlaskin Herbert P. Bostick
C. L. Putnam D. L. Pierce
E. D. Armantro ut, Clayton Purdy
Herbert W. Cooper T. B. Sanzenbacher
Wallace Flower Clifford Mitts
<illiam . Reid. Jr. Ralph Lewright
Harold L. Hale Philip Newall

Wi. D. Roesser

SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 1923
Night Editor-ROBT. C. MORIARTY
HOW SHALL IT BE TAUGHT.
Appearing in Friday's issue of The'
Daily was a communication criticizing
the manner in which history is
taught in the University. The con-+
tention of the author was that a
student seeking' a "fair knowledge '
of the history of mankind"'is forced
to devote at least three years to ac-
complishing this task. He proposed ,
a. remedy that the histoiy of all
time should be taught in one course, '
as though such a nonsensical program
could be carried out with any ap-
proach to adequacy.
Evidently realizing the inherent
weakness in his suggestion the authorj
asked the question, "Can a year's
treatment of civilization cover the
field of history that justly requires(
so many years of study?" And the
answer is unquestionably no. The de-
sire to learn everything about a sub- ,
ject in a short amount of time is a.
weakness an the part of many stu-
dents. Possibly the* importance of
mere detail is over-emphasized in f
many history courses, but if the stu-
dent Is to be able to understand the
working forces of social and human
development he must be, in posses-
sion of a certain amount of historical
information acquired through sedulous '
labor. This information cannot be at-
tained in one course, but much can be
accomplished through a discriminat-
ing choice of a few of the courses
offered.
History of all sciences is perhapsi
least capable of ,standing alone. An,
understanding of historical develop-
ment depends upon some knowledge
of philosophy, sociology, and the va-
rious physical sciences. A student by,
connecting his knowledge of history
with what he learns in other courses,
and realizing the close relationship+
which exists between history and theI
other sciences, may throughout a pe-
riod of three or four years acquire
some idea of historical development.
But to attempt to accomplish this in
one course or even make an ade-a
(1in sheewinninz oards ~lit thrnoh a!

bands morethan fifty years old wouldv
be enabled to leave them in the lurch I met an engineer who said that the
for younger men who are more fit to nuts and bolts in the new field house
he the fathers of strong children. 'were defective and would have to be
removhd. IthhessaysstheygareiNdrG.-I
Such statements show that the grace- removed. If he -says they are N. G.
ful little dancer has been for some I guess they are, but when you stop
time beyond the pale of civilization: to think of it if all the nuts and bolts
she has been in the pale of Russia. are removed from the field house it 1
It would be fitting for the papers will raise hell. There must be a saf-
Iterwwaydtoetakettgem alltoutpArers
to use more discretion in the choice er way to take them all out Are
of the material for their Sunday sup- there any suggestions?c
plements. There is a class of people**
who feed on the sensational scandals ' Here leis "Burnt" Coke
of the day like so many vultures, but He's just plain tired1
it must be admitted that the majority Is this poor bloke
of the thinking citizens desire real Of being fired.
literature Sunday morning. *OP.
ON ELECTING COURSES Here is A TEARABLE point to dis-
An interesting study n the psychol- agree with.
ogy of course selection may be found ***
in the spasmodic fluctuations in the 1T TS TOO1
enrollment of various courses in the Ain't it a gran' an' glorious feelin',
Literary School. As a general rule when you are sittin' restless and you
the average student is supposed to would like to get out of the class to;
elect the courses which will yield him make up a little extra work in His-;
the greatest benefit during the course tory Ia., and you've got lots of other
of his post-academic career but if we i things that you would like to do, and
may judge by the comparative popu- just as about five or six of you get on.
larity of a few particular courses, your duds and start to leave the
there must be another motive which room, OH BOY, ain't it a gran' an'
guides the student in preparing his glorious feelin' when the prof comes
curriculum. rshin' in through the door?
During the period of the war there TEARABLE.
was a tremem'dous reduction in the *
enrollment in German courses while Spider Walks
French and Spanish departments 1 Campus, campus, striped white,
were constantly increasing in size. Like a writhing spider in the night
Certainly this was due to something That neither moves, nor crawls, nor
other than interest in the future ben- creaps,'
efits to be derived from such studies. It is the hour of twelve-- the spider
It was directly responsible to the cur- sleeps.
rent opinon of the time against Ger-
many, with extremely close connec- Campus, campus golefl gray,
tions with the French and ever broad- Covered o'er by busy ants in 'mid of
ening commercial relations with day
South and Central America, where That hasten off their work to make,
Spanish is spoken. It is the hour of twelve--the spider is
Now we find courses in Organic Ev- awake.
olution occupying the attention of IRegnife.
many due to the absorbing contro. * "
versy concerned with the teaching of if you have ever tried to buy any
evolutionary principles in the schools. books at any time, which I suppose
As this controversy subsides there you have, you will be able to see
will undoubtedly be a falling off in| how easily the knowledge of bridge
the enrollment in such courses as can be applied to even those sordid1
take up the problems of Darwinism things. Perchance if you are a male
and others, just as there has been an student there are times when you
increase in the German enrollment must cast aside pride and lower your,-
following temporary conditions which | self to the plain of a commoner. No
prevailed during the war. doubt you have at some time tried
'to make both ends meet by saving a.
STUFFY CLASSROOMS little money on your books or at i
This is a period of the year when, least save on the actual expenditure
after the necessity of firing furnaces j no matter what you put in the little
to their limit during the rigorous green book of the old boy's. As I1
days just past, winter heat is liable said if you have at any time tried to
to be applied to class and lecture buy other than new books you have
rooms in summer weather. Overheat- found how bridge can be applied to
ed classrooms are largely responsi- this purchase. Books as a general
ble for a sort of spring languor, akin rule are divided into three classes:
to spring fever, which permeates the first, second and third. This is where
student in these days of balmy air bridge comes in, that is it regulates
and warm southern breezes. That asp- the price of book.s. First hand about
athy is generally considered a natur- as the dealer sees fit, second hand
al and inevitable concomitant of low, and third hand high. I never
warmer weather, and lecturers and had occasion to buy a fourth handed
instructors usually 'resort to lighter book but as a rule it would TRUMP
discourse's and more frequent jokes all the others.
to keep the attention and interest of
the lethargic student. Mary had a little lamb

when advertising material appears to
dwindle low.
ENGLISH - THE BASIC SUBJECT
(Ohio Lantern)
No subject has been more in the
public mind in recent years than edu-
cation. Captious criticism has been
directed against the whole struCture
of the American educational system,
and it passes without comment that
many valuable suggestions, pro'mpted
by a spirit of genuine helpfulness,
have also been offered for its im-
I)ro enme n t
Uh imately the whole question re-
solves itself into an inquiry into the
ends of education-whether it is to
be utilitarian or strictly academic -
and then into whether these ends are
being served. Much has been said in
defense of both a strictly classical ed-
ucation and a specialized training, and
yet in the welter of comment and ar-
gument which has been expended on
this point, a fact of fundamental im-
portance has been overlooked.
Practical education is assumed to
be acquired skill and knowledge which
can be put into practice constantly.
The point as argued by defenders of
the modern trend of education is in-
disputable: but in the search for the
practical side of education the study
of the English language has been
grossly neglected.
This verbal means of coinmuiica-
tion is used nearly every minute of a
person's waking hours. Supposedly it.
lies at the basis of all human inter-
course and precedes any other subject
taught in the schools. More consider-
ation of the fact that the use of any
bit of acquired knowledge which col-
leges may impart depends upon its
being communicated in some fashion,
argues the justification and practica-
bility of the study of Engish.
The ears of readers of newspapers
and magazines have long been attun-
ed to the cry that products of our
highly efficient educational sysem
cannot use the English language ef-
fectivelv. It must be admitted that
the criticism is true.
* If college education in especial is
to be practical, if it is to place in the
hands of its subjects tools which they
can use constantly and well, if orna-
mental courses are to be erected to
places of importance at the expense
of elemental subjects, the study of
English will be restored to its proper-
place. It is the keystone of education.
It has been almost three days now
since we have been notified of the last
war, revolution, or other outbreak.
The world must be growing peaceful.
The building operations going on in
connection with the new literary unit
indicate to some extent just what or-
ganizational efficiency can achieve.
Someone has intimated that certain
seniors who have full credits may
not graduate this June, unless they
pay their class dues.

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"It pays to walk a fem blocks

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K /
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But f you drink Milk-
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MR. STEWARD-Do You Wantthe Best?
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