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February 17, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-17

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DAY AND NIGHT
SEVICE

ANN ARBOR, MIOEIANO FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17,.1922

PRIC eIV

11

THAT CON.
TO ACCEPT

NT

*THIS LEVY
ERWISE SAYS BILL
)ULD BE POSTPONED
' and McCuinber Do Not Be.
ve That Legislation Ought-I
to Be Dropped

(By

Associated Press)
n, Feb. 16.-Pay the sold-
'ith the general sales tax,
the legislation, was Pres-
ig's advice today to con.

airman Forduey of the house
and means committee and Chair-
McCumber of the senate finance'
nittee said they did not think the
s would be postponed, but were
:tas to a sales tax.
ders. of the agricultural bloc
outspoken, however, against this
nd threateh to object with a pro-
which would include re-enact-'
of excess profits a'nd higher in-
taxes -and an increase-inherit-
and some other such taxes. This
also was disfavored by some
)ratic leaders.
ponents of a sales tax professed
confident that because of the.
.g' desire in both the house and
e to put through the bonus bill
is session, a majority of the

"Theodora" Will
Aid Serlice ien
Plans for raising funds to complete
the Memorial reading room 'on the
second floor of the Union were dis-
cussed at a meeting of ex-,service men
lat-night. Chairman N. K. Chamber-
lain, '22E, announced that $700 of
$15,000 goal hat been raised. Carl H.
Smith, '24L, told the men that they
were now at a critical stage of the
campaign, and every service man must
lend material assistance or the en-
tire plan will fall through.
aThree definite attractions have been
arranged to raise fun~ds. Theodora,
proclaimed by New York critics to be
the, movie sensation of the year, will
be shown in Hill auditorium Wednes-
day and Thursday 6f next week.
Within the next few weeks another
dance will be given in Waterman
gymnasium. A carnival, or fair, will
be the third method of raising the
mopy needed. The ex-service" men
plan that there shall be no begging in
their campaign, and will give full val-
ue for the memorial reading room,
SOPH. PROM WILL
BEHELD'MARE3
Souvenirs Will Be Given Out, Durig
Dance Which Will Last From
9 to M O'clock
PLAN FOR DISTRIBUTION OF
250 TICKETS TO '24 MEN
March 31 is the date definitely de-
cided upon for the Soph Prom by the
Prom committee which met last night
at the Union. The customery date for
the event is Friday of the week preced-
ing Spring vacation and the date de-
cided upon will coincide with' this
custom.
. ]}scus Plans
Further plans were discussed by the
committee of which, John P. Bernard,
24E, is chairman, and men were ap-
pointed to take charge of the several
arrangements. Two hundred fifty tick-
ets will be issued for the affair and
distribution of them will be undertak-
en in a manner similar to the method
used ,by the J-Hop committee. De-
finite plans will be announced later.
As ,usual the Prom will be held at
the Union. Dancing will last from 9 to
3 o'cock with an interinissio4for lunch
at 11 o'clock. Souvenir programs
which will be given out, decorations,
and other features will be novel and
original and the committee is planning
to have this year's Prom surpass all
otiers in splendor and magnificance.
Must Pay Dues .
Only those sophomores who have
paid their class dues will be considered
in the distribution of tickets and all
sopohomores who have not paid their
dues should do so at once if they ex-
pect to attend this year's Prom.
Mary Tunison, '13, Dies Tuesday'
Miss Mary Tunison, '1, of Fenton,
died Tuesday, Feb. 14, at her home.
Miss Tunison was a Michigan graduate,
was a member of Chi Omega and of1
Phi Beta Kappa.,

Also Depicts Large Cattle Ranches
Political Life in
Uruguay

TELLS HOW RUBBER COFFEE
AND SUGAR ARE PRODUCED
"Oriental South America," was the
subject on which Harry A. Franck, '03,
"the world's most accomplishe and
expert traveller" and author of eight
noted books on his travels and adven-
tures, delivered his lecture last night
at Hill auditorium under the auspices
of 'the University Oratorical associa-
tion.
Interprets Customs
A simple description by Mr. Franck
of the life and customs of the work-
ing people of Brazil, Paraguay, and
the three Guianas, made vivid and pic-
turesque' by lantern slides, delighted,
the well filled auditorium. The. travel-
er, throughout his lecture interpreted
the meaning of the life and customs of
the people by his description.-
Mr. Granck first described the large
cattle ranches of Uraguay and told
something of the political life of the
Uraguayans. He then spoke of Brazil,
describing the towns and townsmen
of all the more important and sea-
coast regions of that country.
He pictured the life of Rio de Jan-
erib,-"the most beautiful city of the
western hemisphere,"-its "large state-
ly buildings," its "long and elevated
aquaducts," its "picturesque harbor,"
its "antiquated churches," its "people
of different tongues and colors," its.
"Portugese venders," and its "civic in-
stitutions.".-
Pictures Interior
Mr. Franck also gave a number of
descriptions of Brazilian life in the in-
terior. .He told of the 'different steps
in the production of rubber, coffee,
sugar, and other South American pro-
ducts. Descriptions of the "City of
Tree,", the "Palm-leaf fan tree,"
the."gregarious birds," and the "snake
farm" al proved new and interesting.
S EN, PEIRCE, TO, SPEAK
HERE TOMORROW NIGHT
Senator G. F. Pearce, of Australia,
who has been secured to fill the vacant
number in the series of Oratotical lec-
tures, will deliver his address "Our
'Future Interests in the Pacific,' at 8
o'clock tomorrow night inHill audi-
torium.
Senator Pearce is in this country at
this time in order to represent Austra-
lia at the conference fog the limitation
of armaments, his appointment being
endorsed by the commonwealth parlia-
ment.
While serving at the confer6nce, the
seantor was the representative fot'
British empire on the sub-committee
appointed to deal with the question of
the conference which dealt with wire-
less matters in China.

FRlANOK DESCRIBES
LIF 11IN BRAZIL

and

Fewer Students fail This Year

Than In Same Period In 1920

Every effort will be made to send
out the marks of the students of the
literary college for the courses which
they took the past semester either to-
day or tomorrow, according to Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall.'
Fewer students failed to pass their
courses this past semester than in
1920 and there is good indication that
the number of warnings to be sent out
this semester will be considerably
sialler. Many students who have
'been on probation or who have. been
warned as a result of the grades
which they received in their courses
last year will have their probations
and warnings lifted and will again be
eligible for campus activities.
Notices from.Registrar Hall's office
have been sent to the 152 students.
JUNIUS WOOD, F~Aus
WRITER, TO TALK TODAY
H is 20 YEARS' JOURNALISM EX-
PERIENCE ALL OVER
WORLD
Junius B. Wood, '00, famous news-
paper 'writer and war correspondent,
will deliver a lecture at 11 o'clock this
morning in University Hall on his
20 years of experience in journalism,
an experience which as taken him into
almost every part of the world,
through the World war with the
American Expeditionary forces, and
through the two Mexican expeditions
+ and the Cuban uprising.
At Armament Conference
During the past two years Mr.
Wood has been in the Far East and
traveled through Japan, the Philip-
pines, China, the South Seas and Si-
beria. He was called back to help
cover the. Armament conference in
Washington. /
At present he is delivering a series
of lectures before university students.
Recently he was invited to talk to
the Army and Naval War colleges. He
insists that he is still a newspaper
man and not a lecturer, and that he is
coming to Ann Arbor to give a talk
and not lecture, and also to look
over the university once more.
Luncheon at Union
The lecture will be of particular
value to students in journalism and
also those who desire to hear a first
hand report on world events of the
past few years.
Following the lecture in University
Hall, Mr. Wood will be the guest of
the Students' Press club at a lunch-
eon at 12:15 o'clock in the Union. He
will make a short talk after the
luncheon. The luncheon is open to all
who are interested in hearing Mr.
Wood. The price is 75 cents.
YOST TO PRESIDE AT
ATHLETES' RECEPTION

would come to accept
er than see the bonus

this
pro-

ul

IMMISSIONERlS
"ANNUAL MEETING

PPEARANCE AND DEVELOPMENT
OF. HIGHWAY IS SUBJECT
OF MORNING TALKS
Road commissioners of the state
ld their annual meeting yesterday
connection with the eighth an-
ial conference on highway engi-
ering, which is beinyg held' here
is week under the auspices of the
Ileeg of engineering.
Elect Officers
County highway department rep'.
sentatives delivered their annual
ports at the morning meeting.
ank F. Rogers, state highway com-
issioner, spoke. at the afternoon
eeting upon distribution of state
ward funds.
The Michigan Road. Commission-
s' and Engineers' association elect-
officers in connection, with their
nner yesterday evening in the
pion assembly , room. Martin De
[oppen of Lapeer county was made
esident; J. J. Campbell. of' Huron
unty, vice-president; and, Walter
hner of McComb county, secretary-
easurer .
Last Meeting Today
This morning's meeting, the last of
e conference, will be devoted to
adside development and appearance
highways. Prof. Filbert Roth, of
e forestry department, will pre-
le. Prof. A. K. Chittenden, of the
restry department .of Michigan
.ricultural college, will discuss,
rowth of Roadside Trees."
"Appearance of Highways" will be
e topic 'of a talk by C. F, Boehler,
adscape engineer of the state high-
ay department. Useful roadside
anting and the relation'of roadside
velopment to telephone companies
e among the subjects on the pro-
am*

'whose work for the past semester has
proved unsatisfactory. These notices
instruct the students tto call at the
office of Prof. W. R. Humphreys, as-
sistant dean of the literary college, at
a 'set time 'in order to consult with
him as to their respective standings
and to communiate to him their rea
sons why they shoyld be permitted by
the faculty to remain in the Univer-
sity. The decision of each individual
student's case will be made at the
meeting of the administrative board
of the literary college which will be
held Tuesday.
More than 200 students have noti-'
fied the officials- through Professor
Humphreys, assistant dean, that they
were leaving the literary college at
the end of the past semester. In many
cases, and in almost all of the cases
where the student is dropping entire-
ly out of the University, the reason is
financial. The majority of the others
who are leaving the literaryhcollege
are doing so in orer to transfer into
another college of the University.
UNIVERSITY BUY5S$
BUIL DING SITES
One Entire Block Purchased as Well
as Several Smaller
Plots
ARRANGEMENTS ALREADY MADE
FOR RAZING HOUSES ON LAND
{
Evidence of the activity of the new
University building plans is shown by
the large purchases of land in the vi-
cinity of the campus .on which the
new University buildings will be
erected. Although actual construe-
tion is not as yet well-under way the
sites for the new buildings are now
definitely located, the land acquired,
and the breaking of ground held up
only until the arrival of warm
weather.
The entire block included between
East University avenue, Church
street, College street, and Washtenaw
avenue has been purchased and ar-
rangements. havebeen made for the
razing pf the houses thereon.
Buy 198 Feet Moe
The middle of the block on East
University avenue by the Tappan
school measuring 198 feet on East Uni-
versity and extending back to Church
street is now University property and
will be cleared shortly to make room
for the new buildings.
On South University two-thirds of
the block included between Haven
street, East University avenue, South
University avenue, and Monroe street!
has been purchased, and in addition
the University has bought up several
outlying lots in the neighborhood of
the present campus to be used for lat-
er additions to the present building
program.'
To Sell Smaller Houses
The 'work of clearing out the hous-
es on the newly acquired property on
East University avenue has been giv-1
en over to the Ann Arbor Asphalt
company and the work of razing these
buildings is already under way. The
smaller houses will be sold and mo- I
ed to new locations,, while the larger3
ones will be torn down and the ma-
terials sold or used in other construc-1
tivn work of the company.
Encounter Opposition
Opposition to. the present building
plans has been encxntered from some
of the local merchants and townspeo-
ple who do not look with favor on the
clo.2ng of some of the streets which
will doubtless be necessary.
"I believe that the University is the
life of Ann Arbor, and that, if neces-
sary, half of the streets of this city
should be closed to permit the carry-
ing out of the building program a
proposed by the University," said H.
L. Abbott, city postmaster, in speak-
ing of the opposition which many mer-
chants had raised with respect to the
building plans of the University which'

would necessitate the closing of cer-
tain streets.
TROJEAN CLUB TAKES PLACE
WITH CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS
A new campus organization came
into existence three weeks ago when

INFORMATION ON
I
MAKING OF TREA9TY
LEADERS OF .OPPOSING RANKS
UNITE TO SEND QUERY TO
HARDING
DISCUSSION INDICATES
DIVERSITY OF OPINION
Foreign Relations Committee Brings
Four Power Pacific Treaty
to view
(By Associated Press)
Washington,' Feb. 16.-Senate de-
bates-on the four power Pacific treaty
began today with the preliminary re-
sulting in a request being sent to
President Harding for all available
infar;atwou as to how the treaty was
negotiated.
Senate Opinion Divided
An hour of general discussion, which
brought to the surface various cross
currents -of senate opinion, but failed
to develop definitely the relative
strength of sipporters and opponents
of the treaty, preceded the adoption of
the formal request for information.
The resolution of"request had the sup-
port of Republican and Democratic
leaders alike and was approved with-
out a record vote.
While it awaited the President's re-
ply, the foreign relations committee
decided to go ahead with other treat-
ies resulting from the arms negotia-
tions in the hope that all of them might
be passed to, ratification without con-
siderable delay.
Discuss Naval'fTreaty
,At a meeting late in the day, the
committee completed its reading of the
.naval limitation and submarine treat-
ies without bringing to light any in-
dication of opposition. 'Tomorrow it
will lead to the general far eastern and
Chinese tariff pact.
Senator Hitchcock, of Nebraska,,
ranking Democratic member of the
committee and leader of the unsuc-
cessful fight for 'ratification of the
treatey of Versailles, presented the
resolution requesting full information
from the President.
ALEXOWN WLLDELIER
SUDYATRONTALK

"OPPORTUNITIES IN THE
UTILITIES" jHOSEN,
TOP[C

AS

COACH

A. A.
WILL

Union Theater' Will Be Dedicated
Opening Performance Tonight

STAGG OF CHICAGO
RESPOND TO
TOAST

Michigan's first theater for students1
and run by students will be officially
opened tonight by Mimes of the Michi-
gan Union, honorary ,Union dramatic
society, which is presenting "Make It'
For Two," the 1922 Union opera, as,
the first of a series of week-end at-
tractions. Prof. H. A. Kenyon of the1
romance language department will
make a .brief address dedicating the
building just before the rise of the
first curtain.
Give Souvenirs
As a souvenir of the opening of the
new theater, piecesof sheet music of
the song hits of the opera will be
handed to everyone in attendance. The
ticket sale at the theater box office
yesterday was brisk, but only men
were supplied with tickets as it had
been announced that only men would
be admitted to the grand opening of
the theater.
Programs will be given in the thea-
ter every week-end and will comprise
full evening plays, travesties, first
.run motion pictures, and high class
vaudeville. Although the price on the
opening night is to be $2 per seat, the
cost of production will determine the
price foA future attractions and will
be about 50 cents. The Mimes Reper-
toire company, under the guidance of
E. Mortimer Shuter, director of Union
dramatics, will produce the shows,
some to be presented ini the near fu-
ture being "The Charm School," "Fair
and Warmer," and "The Thirteenth

Will Seat 500
With a capacity of 500 people, the
auditorium is not as large as many
theaters, but the facilities are ade-
quate for putting on any first class
productions, amateur or road. The
stage is four feet deeper than the or-
dinary stage, while the 36 sets of lines
is a larger number than most theaters
have for taking care of scenery. Fif-
teen thousand feet of rope are requir,
ed in the loft, for use in handling the
scenery.
Six large dressing rooms are pro-
vided for make-up work. Each is
equipped with a table running com-
pletely around the room. Large plate
glass mirrors, with special make-up
lights, are placed above the tables.
Ample room is supplied for making up
40 men at once.

Coach Yost will be toastmaster at
the reception and dinner in honor of
members of the Chicago track team
and the Wisconsin basketball team
at the Union tomorrow evening.
A. A. Stagg, director of athletics at
the University of Chicago, will re-
spond to a toast. Brief talks will also
be, made by each of the coaches of the
visiting teams and the Michigan
teams, anc also by the captains of
each team.
Starts at 8:30 O'clock
The affair will start at 8:30 o'clock
after the Wisconsin-Michigan basket-
ball game, and will be formal, similar
to the reception given for the Cor-
nell track team last spring.
The friendly feeling which was de-
veloped at that time between the
schools was what prompted this re-
ception. The speaking and musical
program w'ill follow the dinner, which
will be served in the main dining
room.

Alex Dow, president and general
manager of the Detroit Edison com-
pany, will speak upon "Opportunities
inoPublic Utilities," at 3 o'clock Sunday
afternoon in the Union assembly room.
Prominent In 'Field
Mr. Dow is a. recognized leader in
the public utilities field. For more
than 25 years he has been general
manager of the Detroit Edison com-
pany, during the latter part of which
time he has been president of the or-
ganization. He has recently been ac-
tively enaged in the administration of
the affairs of the Detroit United Rail-
way lines, having recently been a di-
rector 'of that corporation.
Mr. Dow directed the designing and
building of the Connor's Creek power
plant,JDetroit, which 'at the time of'its
building was recognized as a great ad-
vance in power plant construction,
and is still among the most efficient
units of its' kind in the world.
Comes From Scotland
Coming to America from Scotland at
the age of 17, Mr. Dow entered the em-
ploy of a telephone company. Later
for several years he traveled as a pub-
lic utility organizer. He established
himself in Detroit as a member of the
public lighting commission, shortly
afterward entering the service of the
Detroit Edison company, as general
manager.

Equip Office Well
Costume' rooms, property room
electrical room, and scenery dock ar
other features of the building. The bo
offlee is fitted with special tick(
racks, and other facilities -for takin
care of crowds rapidly.
The outside of the theater 'yeste
day took' on a professional appea
ance when large opera posters we
put on the stands near the door, an
picture frames set up outside.
There will be no performancec
'Make It For Two" on Saturday nig
as previously announced, due to tt
fact that Mimes will be engaed in ei
tertaining the visiting athletes with
program in the Union.

s,

Musical
quartette,

Tieets on Sale
numbers by the University
and the orchestra, of My-

re ron Chon, '23, will be interspersed Dean Bursley gave permission for the
)x with the talks. Tickets are being sold organization of the Trojean club. At
et bystudents on the campus at $1.50. the present time the club is made up
2g They can also be secured at the main of -literary students in the economics
desk in the lobby of the Union. The department.
r- reception will b concluded in time The club has a membership of 18
rx for the visiting athletes to catch the members. Herbert E. Blackford, '22,
re west bound Michigan Central train at has been elected president. Hiram
ad 11:30 o'clock city time. C. Bond, '22, vice-president, David J.
Park, '23, secretary, Albert J. Schmidt,
of Ridge Recovering '23, treasurer. The purpose of the
ht Dr Ralph W. Ridge, an assistant in club is to promote goodfellowship and
he the Homoeopathic hospital, according the discussion of political and econo-
'n- to word received from his home, is mic problems which face the country
a rapidly recovering. Dr. Ridge was and the world at large at the present
operated on Tuesday for appendicitis. time.

'CIATE
resign-
ake an

HANS KINDLER, 'CELLIST,
will be present as soloist w
Detroit Symphony orchestra N
night in Hill auditorium,

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