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January 29, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-29

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dazing tho a V l
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D PRESS
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Michian as seeas.
hardi Suz t
, if signed, the sig
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in The Daily at th,
to The Daily office
iideration.Nombs.i
ores postage
the sentient,. a

. .EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone U414
AGING EDITOR ...... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELl
Rant Mausging Editor . Hugh W. Htchcock
R K. Adam .1 Over
d"ard Lamibrecht Paul Watze-
iai Bard Chairman..................L. Armstrong Kern
La. Iiershdorfer '. R. Mei..
ty Magazine Editor.............Tho toen W. Sargent, J
' Editor - -g ---- -r..---... -.---- - - - G o g E. Sloa,
Ed Ltor.......l a.{..!«si......... 4.Slny B. Coatea'
.ig Editor .*....... ......George Reindel
' Editor ...... .........lizabeth Vickery
r Editor ............ . . . . R. Was
Aaaitata
g.SAnderston L. ,.Fenwch B. H. ee
Benan Doroth Gieta Robrt M. Loeb
~k P. Brisco Sadyoeth Heath atkrie Montgomery
'. Butler Winoa A. Hibbard R. C. oriarty
N. Byra Harry . Has J. F.Pontin
P. Clark Agnes HHlina t 7ilian Scher
y Clark U. I. Howlett R. B. Tar
P Cnitock Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
ert WVCoe L. S.Kerr DomothWaipple
n 3C.ngin M. A. KiFver L. L.Iost
awson Victor w.lein J. B. Young
A boahe MoirionKch
S .< liott George E. Lardne
BUSJINES8 STAFF
Telephone N O
NESS MANAGER ............. VERNSN 1. HILLERY
isu a................H... Heath,A. 7.Parer
aer "..." .. ...... .....e .* athan W. Rbertson
yt i**!".."+ **+S«a.."! " *W"., **" * John 3J. Hanel, Jr.
^ .S ................. .... ...a... ireld C. Hunt
t Aseitata
C,. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbrede
cioley Janmes Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbrath
aumont- Park Maurice Moul A. Dryer
k Terer ati Godring 'Rcrdf.idona
Mumaa .'.Tyler "Stewena T. H. Wofe
1 David Park Paul ls
SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 1922
Night. Editor-PAUL WATEL
-Assistant.,-L. J. Hershdorfer
Prooreaders-R. N. Byers
z. R. Betron.
W. J. B. STARTS SOMETHING
. Bryan is at it again. Not long ago he spoke
e state of Kentucky on his pet theories regard-
he subject of evolution, and the direct out-
th of that speech is the introduction of a bill
I Kentucky house to forbid, under heavy pen-
the teaching of evolution, or the use of books
ig with the subject of evolution, in any school
rted by the state.,
ghtly more than a year ago, Mr. Bryan ap-
d on the platform of Hill auditorium, and,
:ing on Darwinism, waxed hot and sarcastic,
irew down upon his head an avalanche of
ism for the.very evident absurdity of his state-
s. Mr. Bryan showed by that speech that he
ot undestand therDarwinian theory, and that
s i'gnorant of its real ipprt; yet some of the
emen of the Kentucky legislature have swal-
I his-harrangue, hook, line, sinker and pole
ave prepared a bill aiming to abolish the study
oultion entirely in their state schools.
.se who have introduced the bill have made
selves ridiculous to say the least, nd, if the
e carries, will have held up their state to be
laughing stock of the world". Furthermore,
eir action they have exhibited their utter ig-
ce of what the study of evolution really means,
eave made plain their childlike willingness to
>w; -the arguments of one who is capable of
ing about big words in an oratorical fashion.
tie members of the Kentucky legislature are
g fools of themselves, and, worse, yet, bid
d prevent the full spread of -education in the
by their thoughtless and baseless action. From
tuatioi before us, it would seem that, if our
legislators are to be selected for political rea-
rather than for brain power, some definite
:>ught to be taken to remove from their hands
particle of control as regards higher educa-
trust, however, that the Kentucky legislature
whole is broadminded enough to resist the
i efforts of a gullible few. The man who never
tended a university certainly has no business
ermining the policy of such an institution.
CRITICS AND CRITICISM

persons may be critics - nay, oft must be -
were well to remember that criticism must be
;ent and just if the critic is not to merit even
serious censure. Criticism may not be mere
nding, nor mere disparagement ; and even
it is thoughtfully conceived and justly de-
the spirit of its delivery may not be disre-
>ecting written criticism, apart from the
ss flow of editorials, to which the foregoing
rules apply, are departments of activity -
sic, art, literature, the theater - which re-
pecial treatment by more or less technically
minds. In these fields extensive experience
iturity of judgment are firstly requisite, be-
rhich the personality of the critic must give t

measure to the value and popularity of his work.
His reputation is made or ruined by himself, for
which reason he is commonly allowed great lati-
tude for personal expression. It may be well, how-
ever, to consider what may reasonably be expected
of him from the standpoint of the average reader.
In the first place readers may expect that the
critic shall possess a wholesome. sympathy with the
situation and circumstances of the object which
he is attertpting to interpret, as well as with those
who presumably require some suggestive interpre-
tation of it. "How can a write~r adequately inter-
pret the activity of his age," Matthew Arnold in-
quires, "when he is not in sympathy with it ?" "After
all," writes Edard J. 'Briep, "the purpose of
criticism is to read and interpret sympathetically the
heart of man to himself.".
Readers may expect, in the second place, that the
critic's persuasion and personality shall be compan-
ioned by a tolerable approximation to logic. "Crit-
icism is a form of argumentation, a method of
comparison with univeray standards; not a series'
of loosely used deductions from comparisons with
personal predilections." This is the declaration of
Prof. William T. Brewster, of Harvard.I
It. would require an essay adequately to reat so
brpad and important a topic. Hence resort is here
made to authorities whose words are at once clearer
and more convincing than ours alone could be. Of
course, many types and styles of criticism are de-
sired, corresponding to the numerous classes of
readers who may need them or favor them. "To
each reader, thn, his own critic," writes Prof. Ger-
trude Buck, of Vassar, "and this critic often for
only a limited period of his development."
Variety and originality are to be welcomed, and
no one should be discouraged from making what-
ever personal appeal he will. It is believed, how-
ever, that the two fundamental qualities of criti-
cism above set forth cannot be ignored without for-
feiting the respect and support of thoughtful read-
ers. Thomas Carlyle - certainly a picturesque
enough critic, yet one to whom all men accord en-
during respect - declared sympathy to be the first
essential towards insight. And criticism without
insight is, of course, not criticism at all, but only
so much burlesque.
The r-egistrar's office has made the pleasant little
announcement that no changes in elections will be
permitted after the opening of the second semes-
ter. All of which prompts a sage remark: Choose,
but choose wisely.
With the prospect before us of writing examina-
tions in ice-boxes, we might remind campus janitors
that classrooms unfortunately are not built on the
vacuum'bottle plan: they won't stay warm for-
ever.
Various antics of some gentlemnen we might name
would seem to confirm the theory of evolution to
which they so seriously object.'
Good-bye, good luck, and stay eligible.
~ 'fie Telescop e
They Used to Be
Ike Delehancy Ignatius Fish,
Was as hard-boiled a "stude" as you ever could
wish.
And oft would he tell of his bold, escapadesj
At winning the hearts/of the Michigan maids.

REDUCTIONS CON A
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Local Cars West Bound-7:. a. m., s:40
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PROPAGANDA AGAINST
PROUIITIONt

Ir

(New York Times)
According to the Fderal Prohibition
gommissioner, Roy A. Haynes, "in the
reat metropolitan district there Is an
.nsidious, clever, unpatriotic, false wet
dropaganda under way that has as its
jbject the delusion of the American
jeople into the belief that the prohi-
AItion law is a failure, that it was
slipped over' on them, that it is un-*
popular, and that it is not -enforced ..
mnd never can be." All of these asser-
don, Mr. Haynes says, are false, but
.o the deception of dmany they''are clr-
culated industriously by "thirty paid
Irganizations," all working' to bring
about the abrogation or nullifycion
f the amendment.
Whether Mr. Haynes is right or not
is to his thirty organizations, there i
,'o doubt that a good many people
who are not paid talk about prohibition
lust about as 'they would itfthe pro-
paganda he describes existed and was
working efficiently. They are glibI
with confident assertions that drink-a
ing has increased under prohibition
and that there is, more abuse of al-
cohol than ever. before.. That they.U
know anythingaboutrgeneral condl
*ions or as to the state of public senti-
ment is shown by nothing they say and
is ;more than doubtful, but observers
who try to see the situation as it is
will incline to the belief that prohibit-
ion is not so much of a failure as its -
enemies insist or so much of a success
is its friends claim.
That it has made a big change for
'he better in industrial circles is the
verdict of all employers of labor. That
much seems to be a certainty among
all the uncertainities, and it is not
a little.

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nation of dance
heard in Ann A

Packard Academy
Friday, Feb. 3rd, 1922

Tickets at Graham's and Wahr's
Dancing 9 to 1 o'clock

While Willie Simplicitus Faversham Tittle
Would run at the sight of a girl, big or little.
His friends all agreed, "If Bill keeps this life
He certainly never will find him a wife.
s.
But now look at these two when school days have
passed,
Shy Willie has gotten a wifie at last.
A family of two in their parlor now roam,
While Ike is a "batch" and takes meals at their
home.
Medics, Attention!
"Who's' that fellow over there singing 'I Want
to Go Back to Michigan' so earnestly? Must be
an alumnus."
"No. he's only a frosh medic. He spent three
years in the Lit school."

I

III,

GUEST TAISTC FOR HOP
EXTRA

All organiations whosP lists f
of guests for the Junior Hop are
to appear in the Hop extra must
mail or bring to the editorial of-
fioes of The Daily a typewritten
list of nests not later than Mon- I
day evening. Feb. 6. Noliste will 1
be received after that time, but I;
any necessary corrections in the
original lists will be made.

News?

Quoth Eppie Taff:
'Twas the first day of September
When lie puffed his first seegar-
As I rightfully remember,
'Twas the last of August Carr.

New flic'ke y'- Freeman
Spring Suitsare here.
You've always liked the
suits and now you'll like
the price.

, How his many friends do mourn him
As he turns now into sand,
Yes, he was a boy of promise,
And he reached his promised land.
---D'ing.
Blankety Blank Verse
What queer funny little things my blue books are-
Ain't got no writin' in 'em almost hardly.
But when the prof he grades them-they ain't so
durned funny,
'Cause I get E on my little blue books
On account of they ain't got no writin' in 'em al-
most hardly. - Ermine.
Pam ous Closing Lines
"Just a light summer coat." modestly said the
young hero as he returned from the beach with a.
mahogany complexion. ERM.

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