100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 05, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'1

shed every morning except Monday during the Univer-
by the: Board in Control of Student Publications
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED' PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
on of all newa'ndispatches credited to itor not otherwise
n, this paper and the local news published therein.
red at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
fe.
ription. by carrier or mail, $3..
s: Ann Arbor Press .building,Maynard Street.
es: Business; 960; Editorial, 2414.
nunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
it ne essarily to appear in print,but as aneevidenceof
lntices of events will be published in The Daily at the
.of theEditor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
comnmuiations will receive no consideration. No man-
ill be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
D)aly dfloes nriotnecessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
i'te communications.
a Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
ening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
.NG EDITOR ..........'BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Managing Edtitor...............Hu W.Hitchcock
Or......................... . Lovejoy, Jr.
tors-
~i .Stahl G. 'P. Overton
Adams Hughstoii McBain
aul Watzel dward Lambrecht
'. . McPike,
T. . T Whinery, L. A. Kern S. T. BeachbE.R. Meiss
at Editors...............T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
Editor..............................George Reindel
Editor F. ..liabeth 'Vickery
ditor ...............................E R. Meiss
Assistants4
B. )rny Jhnt Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
ce J! lylottr idney B.s Coates Julan Mack
Klaver Lowell S.K err oward Donahue
sy Whipple H. . Howlett Arnold Pleig;
1 Koch Katherine Montgomery
B{SINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
}S MANAGER.............. VERNON F. HILLERY
g .. ................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
n..... Nathan W. Robertson
........John J. Hamels, Jig.
. .... .....Herold C. Hunt'
-T Assistants t
. Willis Heidbreder Tyler Stevens
Walter KC.,Sherer MVartin Goldring
w. Cooley L. B. Parks
fs wishing to secure information concerning news for
of The 'Daily should see the'night editor, who has full
all news to be printed that night,.
WEDNEBDAX, OCTOBER 5, 1921
Night Editor-R. E. ADAMS, JR.
" will be a meeting of the Cubs' chub at 4
this afternoon..
THE RADIO COMES TO LIFE
rmnection with the proposed Western Con-
Radio News Service, those in charge of the
1ty radio station here have signified their
ess to aid in all such efforts to use the air
l work, and have shown a considerable de-
interest in the project itself.s
believed by the editors of Big Ten student
pers that radio can be used to great advan-
tween the various schools for the handling
collegiate news. Under the present system
langes, items of news reprinted from one
d others in the acountry are necessarily de-
.nid often thien are only used for "filler" be-
th tardiness. Underan arrangement
11 the various publications could be put in in-
uch with one another on one, two or three
each week, and whereby college news could
hed through witiin a few moments, it
be possible for papers to keep their readers
etter informed as to the activities at other
and universities than it is under the present
e convention of the Western Conference Ed-
ssociation, held in Ann 'Arbor last spring, it
ided by the editors that it would be well, for
sent at least, to limit the system to the uni-
s of the Big Ten. In short, it was felt that
I be best to start off without attempting. to
too large a body, but that eventually, should
:em prove a success, it could be extended
to include newspapers outside' of the Con-
in case those had not already developed
system for themselves.
ugh it is impossible to rush the scheme along
3ly as might be desired, because many obsta-
met constantly by each of the Conference

in getting things under way, it is hoped
iose interested that it will not 'be long before'
em can be placed in constant use. To this
local authorities have donated the use of
ation, and it is to them that the credit for the
success of the venture will ultimately be
the beginning of the war, the Michigan sta-
lain in comparative idleness, but now it is
)used again into activity. Local wireless en-
s are showing a willingness to give their
d energy to the handling of the news serv-
1 it is to be hoped, for the benefit of inter-
ity news, that their efforts will soon be in
'ay successful.
kiN INTELLECTUAL STIMULUS
ri the greater educational functions of the
ity of Michigan outside the routine of
m instruction,. is the opportunity given to
of gaining inspiration through lectures and
nediums from men and women who have
hemselves famous nationally or internation-
this year it would seem that through the,
cal association lecture course an unusual
is being given; the balance and general ex-
of the announced program bespeaks the
:erest of the men in charge of the selections
rting to the ,student body a series of lec-

teresting, but intellectually stimulating as well.
From October 28, when John Spargo, novelist,
journalist, and leturer, will speak, until February
24, when Irvin S. Cobb, internationally famous hu-
morist, will elucidate the highly promising subject
of "Home Folks", the course presents at convenient
intervals a personnel of speakers which would be
difficult to better.
-The enthusiasm and interest which has greeted
Oratorical association lecture courses in past years
is particularly gratifying, demonstrating as it
does, that the student body is awakening to the real-
ization that attendance at these lectures is just as
important a part of a university education as is a
daily appearance at classes. Class-room work aids
in. preparing ourselves for the vocation which we
are to follow after graduation but it is such advan-
tages as those offered by this year's lecture course
which add that bit of inspiration necessary to the
broadening of the viewpoint, the increasing of the
perspective, and the general and fuller enjoyment
of education.
FOLLOW THE LEADER
In the good old days when the gang played "fol-
low the leader" out on the corner lot, it was con-
sidered a matter of personal -honror by each young-
ster involved to accomplish every feat performed
by the leader in front, no matter how difficult or ri-
diculous the task might be. Two hours confine-
ment after school could have been no more hateful
to each youngster than failure before his com-
rades. This was the spirit which made the game
a success, and which has perpetuated it as a child-
play classic in America.
In these good new days when Michigan's team is
fighting on the gridiron, a slightly altered form of
"follow the leader" is in order among the side-line
rooters. This game is known as "follow the cheer
leader". The effectiveness of this more advanced
sport depends entirely upon the initiative and spirit
with which those in the stands enter into it. But if
we are to take last Saturday afternoon as an exam-
ple, it-is evident that the grown-up youth at Michi-
gan fails to join into the game with the same lusty
ambition that characterized the olden sport. Rea-
sons for this are not hard to discover.
From the cheer leader's point of view the rooters
are lazy and spiritless, while the crowds in turn
nurse a pet idea that some cheer leaders are unrea-
sonable. Both sides are responsible for the exist-
ence of these beliefs. In the first place, the cheer
leader and his assistants should employ a bit of
home-psychology in the exercise of their cheer-
leading powers. They should call for a cheer when
the onlookers are anxious to express their favor or
encouragement, and not force one upon rooters who
are temporarily interested elsewhere.
Trick yells, and prep school cheers adapted to
University purposes are mnother source of poor
cheering. Michigan has for years had four or five
dependable cheers which the rooters know. These
should be stressed to the entire exclusion of new
formulas which only succeed in taxing the patience
of those in the stands, with discouraging results.
The crowds in- turn should respect their cheer
leader as they do the workers in any other campus
activity, 'and respond to his megaphone with a true
spirit of playing their part in the game.
In the olden days' on the corner lot the leader
set the pace, and his followers slaved faithfully to
live up to it. But maturity refuses serfdom, and
consequently both the leader and the rooters on
Ferry field must co-operate if Michigan is toobtain
the best possible cheers to urge on her teams to
victory.
~- The elescopeI
"Gratis"
(A piece of free verse)
Bright exotic lusters,
Mingled hues and tints
Nodding quick or slowly
Like a glacis of flowers;x
Like a bouquet of blossoms

Banked thick on the hillside
Sparkling and fresh in the morning.
Thus are the hats of women
In lecture at the Natural Science auditorium.
The following is a sign in the Arcade barber
shop:
"HAND PRESSING"
Co-eds and all others interested please take notice.
Quoth Eppie Taf:
With thirteen trumps at Whist one trick
Was made by Jerry Nottem,
He trumped his partner's ace and then
His partner promptly shot 'im.
'Twas All in the Answer
She-I had the most terrible experience last eve-
ning. Jack took me out in his car, and after we
were about ten miles from nowhere he said if I
didn't kiss him, he'd run us both into the river.
Second ditto-Horrors! And did you kiss him?
She-Well, you met us coming in, didn't you?
The Races
To follow up a sure-win tip,
On "Mucelage" he bet his stack;
He lost his cash, his clothes, his 'grip,
'Cause Mucelage stuck to the 'track.
Famous Closing Lines
"Well, can you feature that?" said the debutante
as she handed her picture to the city editor.
ERM.

A complete line of textbi

for all colleges at both stores

"Both ends of the diagonal lAalk

L_ -

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE'
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
in., 7:o5 a. in., 8:ro a. in. and hourly to 9: xo
P. in.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9: 48 P. m.
Local Cars East Bound-:s .m., 7:oo 0a.
mn. and every two hours, to 9:oo p. mn.,' xr:oo
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-t:40 p. m., 12.25
a. in., 1 :15 a. in.
Ta Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a. M., 2:40 p.
M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8.48, 10-.49 a. in., 12:48,y 2:48; 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
p. m.

Fresh Wholesome Meal
ATTRACTIVELY SERVED
IN A PLEASANT ENVIRONMENT
AT REASONABLE PRICES
ATTTHE
LENORE DINING ROOM
Telephone 1856-J
339 SOUTH DIVISION STREET
DELICIOUS COFFEE CHICKEN DINNER ON

1921

OCTOBER

16
30

3
10
17
24
31

4.
11
18
25

12
19
26

6
13
20
27.

7
14
21
28

1921
1
29

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
Inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone. 1792
AUTO LIVERY
416 S. MAIN ST.
PHONE 583-J
With or Without Driver

, n orEA

Feeds Body and Mind-
It is a decided help in
making your work at the
University a success.

-
3

Z411 t11 t111 F1 f1
..
...
,,..
..
,..
_.
..
,..
.,.
.
,..
..,
,
_.
...
i
it

SHOWER BATH AND SWIM for
35c.
at the CITY Y. M. Co A.
SWIMMING POOL OPEN TO MEN 10:00 A. M. TO 9:30 P. M.

EXCEPTING

MONDAY AND THURSDAY-3:30 TO 4:30 P. M.

TUESDAY AND FRIDAY-,

8:00 TO 9:00 P. M.

60-FOT .WHITE TILE POOL -- RUNNING
WATER.

xSPECIAL STUDENT MEMBERSHIP

t.
k"

$6.50 FOR SIX MONTHS

ALL PRIVILEGES

I

"When You Buy, Buy Quality"

'iq..
r ,
. s

Do you know the
BOYDEN SHOE?
All that is good in men's footwear.

Showing this fall in black or
Grain Blucher Oxford.'
The right style for wear
clothes.

tan Scotch
with sport

,5 ,

WAGNER. & COMPANY

For Men
STATE

Since 1848
LIBERTY

STREET

AT

A

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan