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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1922 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DHE MICHIGAN DAIIA

A.

Ever since the days of the old Cir-
cus Maximus people have been crowd-
ing into this or that stadium to enjoy
their particular form of sport. With
the old Romans, chariot racing or lion
baiting used to be the chief attraction
and some historians have figures to
prove that from 260.000 to 485,000 per-
sons could be crowded into the Circus
Maximus. Then there was the Coli-
seum at Rome, which 'although not ex-
actly classed as a stadium, is of the
amphitheater type with a seating ca-
pacity of from 50000 to 87,000.
Football a Cause
American football, which since its
start has been the most popular of
college sports, has been attracting
thousands of spectators, and the big
games of the last few years have
drawn record breaking crowds. One
result of the great war was a nation-
wide recognition of the commanding
importance of physical education and
consequently college athletics have
outgrown their faciliti s and scores of
educational institutions are making
plans for better athletic fields.
Most of the larger universities have
already erected huge stadia. Yale
is known the country over because of
the Yale bowl, which seats 61,000.
This is the largest stadium in the
country and so enormous have been
the crowds attracted by the big grid-
iron contests that plans have been
drawn for additions, and the seating
capacity wll be greatly enlarged.
The Harvard stadium is the oldest
large stadium in the country and orig-
inally seated 23,000 but temporary
stands give it a capacity of 45,000. At
Princeton the stadium is U-shaped
with a seating capacity of 42,000. The
College of the City of New York has a
stadium circular in shape, seating
about 6,000 people. The University
of Washington stadium at Seattle is
U-shaped and seats 60,000. The Wash-
ington, D. C.,. Central High School
stadium seats 6,000. The University
of Michigan, erected a stadium in
1914 that seats 40,000. Lehigh Uni-
versity at Bethlehem, Pa., has a sta-
dium, erected in 1915, that seats 15,-
000. The University of Chicago's sta-
dium seats 10,000 people and will have
to be enlarged to accommodate the
crowds that demand admittance to the
games as the temporary stands are
inadequate. Ohio State university has
a huge stadium under construction at
the present time, while Illinois and
Kansas universities are carrying on

campaigns to secure funds for the
erection of stadia in the near future.
Safety a Factor
Wherever huge crowds assemble to
watch football games the question of
safety is a most imprtant one. It is
for this reason that reinforced con-
crete is now used almost exclusively
for stadia. Not only is the safety of
the crowds assured by such construc-
tion, but there is no danger from fire
and no expenses for repairs and up-
keep.
The stadium movement is not con-
fined to the college and university
towns, because many smaller commu-
nities have made preparations for the
physical development of the young
folks and stadia have been erected
that serve as athletic grounds, fai
grounds and recreation centers. In
Chicago plans have been made and
funds secured for the erection of a
huge concrete municipal stadium on
the lake front which will have a
seating capacity of 100,000 and will be
the largest stadium in the country.
FRANCE PREPARES FOR
OLYMPIC GAMES DF 1924
The greatest structure in the his-
tory of the Olympic games is to be
erected by France for the 1924 meet.
Reports from Paris are that the new
stadium will be erected in the Paris
de Princes. The track will measure
aproximately 500 meters to the lap.
Both straight-away and each curve
will measure about 125 meters, or a
trifle more than 130 yards, giving the
track a total distance of approxi-
mately 525 yards. This will be. the
largest track ever constructed for the
Olympic games, and larger than any
of the famous college athletic tracks.
The stadium is designed to hold
from 100,000 to 150,000 spectators, The,
price will range from one franc, to
boxes at the same price usually paid
in this country.-N
The contract for building the sta-
dium and track is reported about to
be made to the same firm which built
the stands for the 1920 met at Ant-;
werp. It is desired that the track bej
completed at least 18 months before
the meet, and it is pointed out that,
had the Antwerp track and runways
ben thus prepared more records
would have been possible than was the
case in the loose cinder footing which
hampered the runners in Belgium.

BA9SKETBALL SQUAD
WILL HEA9REST
Mather Gives Men a Vacation so That
They May Prepare for Coming
Examinations
DUKE DUNNE REPORTS FOR
PRACTICE; KNEE IN BRACE
With the approach of the semester
examinations, Coach Mather plans to
give his basketball squad a two weeks
vacation, in order that they may de-
vote their time toward keeping elig-
ible. Practices will end on next Tues-
day night and no more organized
scrimmages will be held until Tues-
day night, two weeks later. Neverthe-
less all the men will keep in shape
whenever possible by working out at
irregular periods.
Se-immage Before Ohio Game
Mather plans to start scrimmage
again three days before the team
leaves for Ohio State, where they play
on Feb. 11. This game will be fol-
lowed two nights later by the contest
against Indiana at Lafayette._
Michigan's stock received quite a
boost Wednesday evening when
"Duke" Dunne, erstwhile football cap-
tain and veteran of last -year's court
five, reported for practice. Duke has
been laid up since football season as
far as athletics are concerned with a
game leg and has also been compelled
to devote considerable time to his
law studies, but if he is able to get
into good physical condition he will
be a decided help to Mather. Although
compelled to wear a brace, his leg is
not troubling him to any great extent
and it is hoped that he may be able
to get into some of the games after
the season reopens. Duke is in the
same boat as the famous "Chuck"
Carney of the Illini, who is also ob-
liged to wear a brace while playing
basketball.
Kipke Improving
Harry Kipke, who dislocated his
shoulder in the Illinois game, is im-
proving rapidly and should be back in
his regular form when the team re-
organizes after the bluebooks. The
only drawback is that he will not
have had a chance to get into any
workout with the rest of the squad.
Coach Mather is optimistic over the
team and is hopeful that the team wi 1
strike its stride again next month and
repeat last year's performance by a
whirlwind finish.
Vits Of Sports
More than 800 students at Princeton
competed for the athletic teams last
fall, according to statistics compiled
by Dr. Joseph E. Raycroft, head of the
department of hygiene. This repre-
sents 40 per cent of the total enroll-
ment of the university.
Football was the greatest drawing
card, attracting more than 100 men
for the Varsity eleven and 85 for the
first year team.
Johnny Wilson has been barred from
boxing in 18 states, Canada, and Aus-
tralia, as a result of his tactics in re-
fusing to meet Greb. He is champion,
but a champion with no place to box-
the most unpoular 'chamion in .his-
tory.
A "council of strategy" will direct
the play of the Cincinnati Nationals
this season. The council will be made
up of Manager Pat Moran, Jake Daub-
ert, the veteran first baseman, with
George Burns as the chief field assist-
ant. Daubert will captain the Reds.
Manager Moran and his assistants
will start a drive to make every play-
r run out their base hits.
"There will be no loafing thissea-
son," Moran said today. "Every man
will tear intofirst base at top speed"
There will benostops to find out
where the ball has gone."~

The Detroit American league base-
ball club probably will train this year
at Augusta, Georgia, Frank J. Navin,
president of the organization an-
nounces. Manager Ty Cobb now is in
now

Augusta seeking to arrange for housing
facilities and expects to. conclude ne-
gotiations soon, it was stated.
Augusta was chosen some time ago
but the hotel in which the Tigers ex-
pected to stop was burned. For a time
it appeared that some other training
ground might be selected. Whether
the Detroiters will make their homes
in private residences has not been de-
cided.
The Rochester and Columbus clubs
are to tarin in the immediate vicinity
of Augusta and will provide practice
games with the Detroit club if Cobb
selects the Georgia city.
The first of a series of four meets,
leading to the championship of Amer-
ict, will be held at Saranac Lake, N.
Y., Friday. Arthur Staff, present skat-
ing champion, will defend his title
against such men as McLean and Bak-
er of New York, Edmund Lamy of
Saranac Lake, and Eddie Day, of Can-
ada. The winner will later compete
with Oscar Mathlesen of Norway, the
world's champion, in a match which
probably will be held also at Saranac
Lake.
As appropriate Christmas gifts,.
Samuel Rzeschewswi, the boy chess
wonder, was given two valuable gold
medals from the Boston Chess club
and the Baltimore Chess association.
The medals were to commemorate
his visits to those cities, and ,pending
the little expert's return to New york,
had been placed in the custody of H.
Helms, former state champion.
In a hotly contested game with the
Dartmouth freshmen, Harvard's fresh-
man hockey team won by 4-0.
Harvard's Varsity chess team held
a meet with chess team of the Massa-

chusetts Institute of Technology, the
intercollegiate champions.
Two men for the football coaching
staff of the University of Minnesota
were selected by university authorities
at Chicago Tuesday, the action being
subject to approval by the board of
regents. The authorities refused to di-
vulge the names of the men, but said
it was almost certain that they would
be on the job next fall.
Student for Forty-One Years
Columbia boasts in William Cullen
Bryant Kemp a student who has at-
tended the university continuously for
41 years without missing a, semester.
Patronize onr Advertisers.-Adv.

'
I

I

Try a Daily Want Ad. It pa

U TTL E
A Place to bring your frien
Nowhere is the food better
Nowhere is the service more prompt
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
Maynard Street
A BIT, OF GOSSIP-
Did you know that the First Lac
of the Land bought a Baldwin Grar
Piano without solicitation of any kind
And in speaking of her piano Mi
Harding said: "There is somethir
pleasing about the tone that I haA
never heard in any other piano."

Group photographs of msi
organizations and classes fo:
1922 Michiganensian must
taken during the month of
uary. Sittings should be
ranged at once.
A 7(liableJuweler
C HAPMAin
,1 13 Soulh Main

I

I

Calkine Fletcher Drug Co. and the Cushing
Drug Co. invite the inspection of
- au'v
IREBIO'VI$6.00a
PIPES

I

U,

Ivory
stopper
in the stem
stops all
moisture

11tlilt l .I 1111 i 111111 l1111l11 1t111l1 ii III lllti 1ill ii 11111111I111I 1111111 111111111111111 L
;GOODHEW FLORAL CO.
WeSpcalzei
w .
w-
w-
w
w Corsages
w thtaeditntv
-
w-
w-
Phone 1321 223 E. Liberty
r
SFLORIST TELEGRAPH DELIVERY

Agents for the United States and Canada
GROSVENOR NICHOLAS & CO., Inc.
12 East 48th Street New York Ci yj
CALL 1950-FlH
THE
PRUNER
COAL
COMPANY
Incorporated
-KENTUCKY
-OHIO
-WEST VIRGINIA
--POCAHONTAS
-LEHIGH
ANTHRACITE
--COMFORT COKEs
Quality and Service
Guaranteed
ll11111l il!!l1l111i11111l111lll S

AND HERE ARE THE OPINIONS
OF A FEW NOTED MUSICIANS-
Frances Alda--"Singers derive real artistic ple
even inspiration, from the Baldwin."
Frank La Forge-"I select the Badwin for that
scribable Baldwin tone which we love so i
Pasquale Amato-"The beautiful tone of the Ba
merits its popularity."

,..

r

CLOSES OSES
AT 3 P.M. ADVERTISING AT 3 P.l

WE HAVE A BALDWIN PIANO
IN OUR WINDOW
It will be a pleasure for us to show it to you.
Allmendingers Mi Shop

-

FOBR ENT

w

FOR RENT- Studio and reception
room furnished. Grand piano, stean
heat, electric lights, in business dis-
trict. Price reasonable. Phone 638.
83-21
FOR RENT-Pleasant front suite for
housekeeping or other wise. Two
blocks from campus. Reasonable.
802 S. State. - 83-3
FOR RENT-Double room, warm and
well furnished. Three minute walk
from campus. 510 E. Jefferson St.
Phone 1668-J. 85-3
FOR RENT-Very desirable suite for
next semester. Also a double room
with separate beds. 425 S. Division.
84-3
FOR RENT-Very desirable suite in
good location for next semester. Also
single room 429 S. Division. 84-2
FOR RENT-Two large rooms for four
men. Steam heat, desks. Phone
1194-M. 422 E. Washington. _ 83-5
FOR RENT- Next semester, large
south suite for two students. Terms
reasonable. 822 Arch St. 82-4
FOR RENT-Large front room for two
students next semester. Phone
1564-R. 85-2
FOR RENT-Large, warm suite for 2
or. three students. 543 S. Division
St. 84-2
FOR RENT- Very desirable single
room, 1126 Washtenaw Ave. 85-2
FURNITURE Repairing, Upholstering,
Refinishing, Caning. Verne Smith.
Phone 2616-R. 78-15
LOST
LOST-Gold pencil Thursday near the
campus. Call 715-J. 85

WAVU1E1)
WANTED-Four clean-cut men with
sales ability to work during Easter
vacation in Ann Arbor and nearby
towns. A good opportunity for men
who can qualify. For particulars
see Mr. Leader, 232 Nickel's Arcade.
84-21
WANTED-Fraternity wants to lease
house for about 20 men for one year
or more beginning Oct. 1. Address
Box K. L., Daily. 83-3
WANTED-Students to solicit for the
Crowell Pub. Co. Men or women.
Liberal commission. Inquire at
113 W. Liberty St. _ 85-2
WANTED-A furnished house for the
second semester for group of 12.
Address E. L. M., care Daily. 83-3
WANTED-Dressmaking- sewing of
all kinds. Altering, repairing. Coats
relined. Phone 1936-W. 84-2
WANTED-Women to wash window
curtains at home. Call 325 S. Fifth
Ave. 84-2
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-One pair nickel-plated
tubelar racing skates. Worn 6 times.
Size 8. Call Barth, 912 E. Wash-
ington. . 85-2
FOR SALE-High class custom-made
full dress suit. Size 38. Phone
1893-W. 85-2
FOR SALE-At a bargain-Tuxedo
Coat and Vest. Size about 37. Call
2333-J. 85-S
LOST
LOST-Monday, Jan. 16, red Parker
Fountain Pen. Phone Edith Klatz.
2482-W. Reward. - 84-2
LOST-Set of Drawing Instruments
Return to L. Schleh. Phone 2997-M
84-2

OUR FEBRUARY RECORDS ARRIVED YEST

305 MAYNARD STREET

You Will Be Interested in Our

U.1

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U
* U
A NOBODY
M At least no Michigan man V
® ever played Billiards here
ONCE
8 T),ey are all repeaters. 9
r The more often and reg-
* alarly you play, the great.
* er your enjoyment.
* 0
"U -te ot
S PIPE S LU NCH ES SODAS
* w -y to tveat you wipht" S

January Clearance Sal
of Shoes- and Oxfords

It Will Pay You to Lay 9?way a Pair
at Present Prices

CAMPUS

B O O T E R

304 South State Street

wome a~mason

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