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January 20, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UHE. NMICHIGAN 4DAILI

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STARTING SUNDAY
THE AMERICAN HOME TURNED INSIDE CUT

W[SCONISIN TAKES STEP fOWND FINISHING FIELOI
(By Associated Press)
Another step toward completion of
the Camp Randall football stadium of
the University of Wisconsin will be
taken next spring, with construction
of an additional section of concrete
Seats, and dressing- quarters for all
athletic teams. This will mean an
additional 2,000 seats.
An expenditure of $30,000, has been
authorized by athletic, council, from
funds earned through football con-

tests this past year. Construction of
new stands from this amount wiil in-
volve the removal of the wooden
grandstand which now serves as quar-
ters for the various university teams.
When completed, the Wisconsin
stadium will have cost approximately
$504,000 and will seat nearly 50,000
persons, with training and dressing
quarters for the athletes equal to any
in the country.
T. E. Jones, director of athletics, ex-
pects that the stadium will be com-
pleted from football receipts within
the next few years.
Something for sale? A Classified
4d in The Daily will find a buyer.-
Adv.

.F
witdos
as Ludt Batt.
tke drudging
spinster who
Oersted
for love

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a arat ti;

Members Of Track Squad Will Hold
Another Series Of Relays Tomorrow

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ronm

z", ILLS
S the mzn
wpjckzd
4e ple"s
Lulu's
a= Theodore
ROSE
as pt y
crt s .r. , tart '
of the hmsc rt ;
1yhErc° Lubt,
d leer

ti

A Reduction

14

In Board Prices

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i

4 -,.
.

EFFECTIVE IMME]?IATELY
7.25 ..............:...3 Meals a Day
$6«00 .......... .. .... 2 Meals a Day

Michigan's second miniature relay
carnival of the year is to be held at i
Waterman gymnasium at 3 o'clock to- t
morrow afternoon. Once again the i
members of the Varsity squad will E
compete with one another in the differ- t
ent events, as they did last Saturday,
and it is quite safe to predict that the
races will be exceptionally close and
hard fought.
Four Races
There will be four races, as in the t
previous carnival, with a- few other
exhibitions by the freshmen. The per- 1
sonell of the various relay teams have
not as :yet been definitely decided, but j
it is certain that several men who did ,
not compete last week will be includ-
ed among them. Coach Farrell has re- t
sorted to the competitive system as 1
the best means to determine precisely ,
what men are capable relay perform- '
ers, and incidentally to try to dope out
where his squad stands in this line.
If all relay carnivals are as success-
ful as the first one staged last Satur-
day, no doubt need be entertained as
to the advisability of using this sys-
tern.
Intramural Items
All class and Interfraternity hock-
ey will be postponed indefinitely ow-
'ng to the weather and the. condition
of the ice. Class teams will receive
one practice each and every team
will be notified in time for this prac-
tice before the commencement of the
games. Watch the Intramural items
'n The Daily for notice of commence-
ment of the games.
Results of Wednesday night bas-
ketball games are as follows : Delta
Sigma Phi 2, Alpha Chi Rho 0 (for-
feit) ; Phi Sigma Kappa 2, Chi Phi
0 (forfeit) ; Sigma Chi 14, Psi Upsi-
lon 11; Kappa Nu 2, Zeta Psi 0 (for-
feit) ; Acacia 22, Beta Theta Pi 11;
Alpha Delta Phi 15, _Chi Psi 2; Delta
Chi 19, Theta Delta Chi 4; Delta
Kappa Epsilon 28, Zeta Beta Tau 5;
Delta Sigma Pi 18, Cacique 11; Alpha
Sigma 23, Phi Alpha Gamma 2; Phi
Chi 9, Nu Sigma Nu 7; Phi Rho Sig-
ma 2, Pi Upsilon Rho 0 (forfeit).

Besides laying a great deal of stress
upon the relays, "Steve" hap offered
tickets to the MaJestle theater to the
members of the winning teams as an
added incentive. The men have taken
these relays up with zest and spirit,
and enthusiasm runs high.
Spectators .Invited
Students should not have to be
urged to turn-.-ant to watch these re-
lays tomorrow. Those who attended
the event last week expressed no re-
gret for having done so and it, is cer-
tain that all who put in their, appear-
ance at the gymnasium at 3 o'clock
tomorrow afternoon will not 'suffer
any keen disappointment. Besides the
relays there will be a regular practice
of the entire squad and the work of
the men in the various events should
arrest more than a little attention of
onlookers.
PROF. RALPH AIGILER STILL
III, WITH SCARLET FEVER
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, of the Law
school, who has been confined to his
home since last Wednesday with scar-
let fever, is said to be recovering rap-
idly. Although at first it seemed that
a double infection of both scarlet fev-
er and la grippe had set in, the scar-
.et fever is the only one that has caus-
ed any trouble.
It will probably be a 'month before
Professor Aigler will be able to meet
his classes. During his illness Prof.
Joseph H. Drake will continue Pro-
'fessor Aigler's work.

MIS'S
ETT"
a. NVI"iarn e'
roduction

W F BO 'c .vence
as Meman.w)twx i
Ltrizt twwried be-
fore Slue lcam t iw
lmdanewriv.p I

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EXCELLENT FOOD - WELL PREPARED

QUALITY
SERVICE
CLEANLINESS

F GUSO (
C as the 14milvay
YUIL
1"fti:rl whoil .ng a
bomb at .tutu'
respectab Uit j,
Pay by Zana (date

Teet's Dining Rooms
805 EAST HURON STREET

I

1922 LITERARY CLASS
I
The lists of paid and unpaid
dues will not be posted in the
j Registrar's office until the aft-
ernoon of Friday, l an, to. Every,
senior who has not yet paid their
dues please mail check for ,$2_ to
the treasurer at once. Enclose
self-addressed and stamped en-
velope. for receipt.
C., MAURICE ATKINSON,
Treasurer.

From the Famous Novel and

4. 1,

r

BRING US ANY SALE PRICE IN THE STATE

Allen* Co"s

X40.000 Realization Sale

When

Payne

Wrote

WILL MEEK' AND BEAT ANY CUT PRICES IN MICHIG AN

Men's Suits as low as
Men's O'coats as low as
Boy's Suits as low as

a

- $10.45
- $14.9-)
$5.75

"Home, S w'e'et,
Home"'
By J. R. HAMILTON m
Former Advertising Manager of Wana makees, Rhlladolphla

t
;

That's tall talk but we mean it. If you can find any lower figures advertised bring the newspaper to us and we'll beat the value or openly
apologize to the public here In print.
WE WANT TO SELL - WE ARE GOING TO SELL IF WE HAVE TO ACCEPT 10 CENTS ON THE DOLLAR TO DO IT.
NOW WITH THIS CLEARLY UNDERSTOOD - WITH THIS STOCK AT THESE RIDICULOUS PRICES -- WITH SPRING GOODS 'AWAY
HIGHER ARE YOU GOING TO ACT NOW?

BOYS-' SUITS -- Our best grade of all wool and
worsted boys' suits, with two pair of pants. Reg-
ular' $15.00 values reduced to ......... $9*60
BOYS' SUITS One lot of boys' suits in nice pat-
terns, latest style, formerly sold
at $8.50 and $9.00, reduced to...... $6,55
-
MEN'S SHIRTS -- Men's fine percale dress shirts;
regular $1.50 values, 89C
reduced to ............................. MEN'S NECKWEAR - Men's neckwear in regular
75c values. Q All reduced to ......................." 59c.
MEN'S SUITS Very fine grades of suits and over-
coats formerly sold at $35, $38 and $40; Kup-
penheimer and other & 2 7 Q 5
good makes, all go at ........... / " l
MEN'S TROUSERS --- Men's fine castmeres and
worsted trousers; $5.00, $5.50 and Q
$6.00 grades reduced to ...........3. V 5
MEN'S SHIRTS - Men's tine percales and madras
shirts. Regular $2.00 values, $1.39
reduced to r
MEN'S OVERCOATS -- Men's overcoats,,,, latest style
of Ulsterettes; $25 qualities in the latest shades
of gray and brown;
reduced to....................... tip14.95"
GOLF ROSE -- All our 'finest imported golf hose.
Made by McGeorge in Scotland, at a fraction
of their cost.

MEN'S HOSE-50 dozen men's hose, black and dark
brown; fine grade. Regular 25c and
35c values reduced to ................
BOYS' SUITS - All our' large assortment of two
pant, all wool boys' suits, formerly "' Q
sold at $10.00, reduced to ......... l . J 5
ME "S TROUSERS - Men's wool custom trousers.
"Nicely tailored. Regular $4 and
$4.50 trousers, reduced to ......... " 8
WOOL HOSE - All our regular $1.00 quality of im-
ported wool hose
reduced to ........................... 79c
MEN'S HOSE - Men's hose, Holeproof, and others.
Regular 40c values,
reduced to ............................ Z''f
t c
MEN'S SUITS -- One lot of men's suits in worGteds
and casimeres, formerly $14.80
sold ,at $25.04, reduced to.......
MEN'S NECKWEAR - All men's regular $1.00 neck-
wear in this sale. 7
Reduced to ........................"
MEN'S SUITS - One lot of men's suits (broken
lots) formerly sold at 20.00" ^. " . $10.45
reduced to ..........
BOYS' MACKINAWS - Boys' all wool Mackinaws
made by Gordon Ferguson. Nationally known
for flulp quality. Regular $8.00 and $10.00 va.lties
reduced ........ 6:40 and $ 7.9 0

It is said when John .Howard Payne wrote "Home; Sweet
Home," he himself was a homeless wanderer, in the streets. It
took a man who had no home to make the spirit of home 7mmortal«
The reason why we of today do not appreciate a home more
is that-it is too easy to have one. The place that:our grandfathers
called home was little more than a shelter. They knew, no com
forts such as we have. They had few luxuries, but the ,g that
they called home had been fought for, and so it was dear to them.
Today anyone can have a home almost for the asking.. He
can fill it with big, comfortable furniture that will give him as
much comfort as used to belong only to royalty. He can have
beautiful draperies in his windows and fine pictures on his walls.
He can have a piano or a talking machine. He can have rugs
that are copies of the patterns in palaces. And he can do all this
on the most moderate, the most ordinary, of. salaries or wages.
Day by day this paper is filled with advertising., that -offers
every facility for the furnishing of the home. 2!ot only can the
man -with ready cash furnish his home on a moderate basis, but
even the man without cash can have all the comforts and luau
.vies he desires through a system of credit on home furnish
which has now become almost national in its scope.
This is the season when new homes are springer up 'on every
hand and the season when old homes are being remodeled and
refurnished for another year. Therefore it is the season for home
furnishing opportunities which every live advertising nerehant
is offering at this time.
Do not hold these home-making opportunities too lightly.
Give these advertisers a hearing. What they are saying i$"real,
and what they are doing is makia.g history. There has never been
a time in the history of the world when comfort and lu=ury were
as widespread amongst the people as they are today.
Look over this advertising today. See if you cannot add the
comfort of a home to the pleasure of your life, or see if you cannot
put more luxury and more material. happiness into the home
you have.
Think of what you need most about your.home and then look
for the advertising of those things in this paper today.

"

"

Allen

(a

Company

211 SOUTH MAIN STREET

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