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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4P S- oil
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every mornin except Monday during the 5ai'er
sty year by the Board in Cntreo of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associaea Pre is exclusively entitled to the use ea
spublication of all news dispatches credted to it ea not otherwis
redite4Jss this paper and the lodal news published therein.
Entered at the postofiice at Ann Arbor, MIchigan, as second
lass matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.a.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Pheones:' Bus ijess, 96o; E~ditorial, 2414.

..

Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
re not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
h, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
retion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
ied communications will receive nio consideration. No man-
ptwill be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
e Daily 'does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex
sed in the:communications.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor,...............Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor ................. . P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Nih ditors-
Night R. E. Adams G. P. Orertsni
John P. Dawson M. B. Stal
Edward Lambrecht Paul Watzel
Editoria' Beard Chairman..................L. Armstrong Kern
Assistants--
As Lep Hershidorfr E R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine Editor...............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor............................George E. Sloan
.. siC Editor................. .....Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor........... .......George Reindel
Women's Editor :.......................... Elizabeth Vickery
humor- Editor ............w................ X R. Meis
Assistants
Kingoey S. Anderason L. L. Fenwick B. H. ee
Maure Berimau Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
Cecil R. Betron H. B. Grundy 7. E. Mack
ack's. Briso-. SadyebethHeath Kathrine Montgomery
W..B..Butler Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
R. N. Byers Harry D. Hoy J. F. Pontius
A. D Clark Agnes Holmquist Lillian Scher
Harry. C, Clark H. E. Howlett R. B. Tarr
J.P. Comstock Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
RobetW. Cooper L. S. Kerr Dorothy Whipple
Evelyn J. Cougin M. A. Klaver I,. L. Yot
John P. Dawson' Victor W. Klein J, B. Young
i. A. Donahue Marion Koch
W.PF. Elliott George . Lardner
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ........,..VERNON F, HILLERY
Advertising........................ M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ...............:......---.. Nathan W. Robertson
Accounstit....:,..................... John J. Hames, Jr.
Circulation:. .................... Herld C. Hunt
-.:: Assistants
Burr I. Robbins :Richard Cutting H. Wilis Hedbreder
W. Cooley ames Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
Lf. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer -I: 'in Goldring Richard Heideman
Edw. Murase Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
~RIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1922
N igtt Editor-I. E. ADAMS, JR.
iseistan-H. C. Clark
Proofreaders-M. H. Pryor
V. W. Klein
PROFESSOR BEMAN
After a half .century of devoted service to his
Alma Mater, with each succeeding year a more elo-
quent testimonai- to the character and accomplish-
ments of' its giver; Professor Wooster Woodruff
Beman has passed from our midst. Rhetorical
phrases and oratorical embellishments cannot hope
to improve the eulogy provided by such a splendid
record of fidelity and usefulness.
During the long course of his unequalled term of
service; Professor Beman did muchto spread the
fame, of his University. His text books on mathe-
matics took his name and the gname of Michigan to
schools throughout the ation. In his own quiet
and unassuming way he was an inestimable factor
in the growth of Michigan from her pioneer days
unto the time of his death.
The University will miss Professor Beman as
one who has become a part of her very structure,
and who has made her every interest his own.
Fifty years of 'unselfish and valuable service is
in itself a' tribute which is difficult to surpass.
WHY THE FRATTER LEADS
When a call is sent out on the campus for any
kind of athletics, it is truly surprising to note the
number ,of capable but backward individuals who
back down and fail to show their colors, simply be-
cause they feel that they may not have a chance in
competition against the old timers. Particularly
does this attitude take possession of the "Independ-
ent", all too frequently making him feel that,
merely. because the fraternity mian's name appeas
most. frequently in the B. M. . C. columns, he him-
self would stand small show, even in fair competi-
tion.
This very notion without question is responsible
for the failure of a great many capable athletes to
turn out for track this year. It is easy to under-
stand how the Independent should be led to feel as
he does, but. it is unfortunate that his backward-
ness should keep him off the field or track. No
doubt the fraternity man does lead, as a general
rule. But he does not stand out because of politi-
cal backing, as some would have us believe. He very

frequently comes to the front simply because he has
behind. him men who not only are interested in his
activities as such, but who have their own organi-
zation sufficiently at heart that they will push and
urge him continually until he exerts himself to get
into the race. Or again, the energetic Independent,
having made a name for himself in the University
by his activities, is apt very quickly to be gobbled
up by some fraternity or house club, as soon as he
begins to receive general recognition.
Fraternity connections do not interest Coach Far-
rell, however, or any other "good coach for that
matter. "Steve" and Trainer Hahn need men, and
the fact that so-and-so wears diamond studded pins
on his vest cuts no ice with them whatever. The
non-fraternity man, who has ability and who is will-
ing to work and exert himself, can advance on the

squad just as rapidly as the man of Greek letter
connections. Certainly neither brawn nor the glit-
ter of frat-pins should frighten anyone away from
training quarters. A track squad offers berths for
every conceivable sort of material.
Steve Farrell needs big men, little men, huskies
and lightweights, and needs them in a hurry. Let's
have everybody out!
DO WE WANT THEM?
Next Monday the Detroit Symphony orchestra
comes again to Ann Arbor, and again the tickets
are not going as they should. Such a condition can-
not continue.
Is it lack of appreciation of orchestra music that
is holding back ticket sales? More likely it is in-
activity on the part of those who want the concerts,
failure, in short, to give the series the real kind of
boosting it deserves. The Detroit orchestra is one
of the greatest in the country, and boasts one of
the most skilled of all leaders. It is plain, further-
more, that the School of Music has been doing its
best to make the course a success, by giving its pa-
trons the best talent available. The whole responsi-
bility, then, devolves finally upon the people who
wanted the series in the first place ; it is up to them
to make it a financial success by seeing that Hill
auditorium is packed to the doors Monday night.
The School of Music wvill stand a heavy deficit
this year on the orchestra series, and if indications
of better support next season are not immediately
forthcoming, this course must necessarily be the
last.
UNFAIR CONCLUSIONS
Study of foreign languages has decreased 3.58
per cent in eighteen of the leading universities of
the country during the eight year period of 1911-
1912 to 1919-1920, according to a survey made re-
cently by Frederick Ferry, president of Hamilton
college, and submitted to the Association of Amer-
ican colleges. It was found that the decrease had
been supplemented by increases in the number of
-hours devoted to the study of science and literature.
The survey was hardly carried out on a wide
enough scale to indicate that interest in foreign lan-
guages, on the part of college men and women
throughout the country, is waining. With few ex-
ceptions, only the eastern schools were taken into
consideration, and in many of these colleges the
study of foreign languages which was formerly
compulsory.is now wholly optional. But, if it is
true that such a survey is indicative of a falling off
in the interest formerly taken by college students
in foreign languages, it represents a condition
which is not altogether satisfactory.
Friendship between nations is often promoted by
a common desire on the part of the inhabitants of
one country to study the language and institutions
of another. The university functions as a labora-
tory where this knowledge may be aptly acquired.
But a survey, such as the above, must be carried outI
on a nation-wide basis if the results are to be of
any determinant value. When it is confined to a
certain section or a few schools conditions existing
in the locale where it is made wilf so color the in-
formation obtained as to make the final conclusion
worthless.
"The White Headed Boy" is to be presented here
this afternoon by special request. We are told that
it is agood show, and, incidentally, the proceeds
will go eventually into the Woman's building fund.
C'mon! C'mon! L-t's have a track turn-out that
is really worthy of Michigan.
7ie Telescope
To a Cafeteria
I've used your dirty, greasy spoons,
And never raised a howl;
I've eaten many half-raw steaks,
And still I did not growl.
Your soggy potatoes I stood,

Nor any kick did utter;
But I get sore when the cashier
Parks my check in the butter.
-Vee Dee.
What a Wheeze
Her overshoes flap in the breeze
In weather below ten degreeze;
She whispered, "0 gosh,
What a chilly galosh,"
As she waded through snow to her kneeze.
- Ichabod.
'S Funny
Dear Erm:
What is the technical name given to the experi-
ment which Ben Franklin made in harnessing elec-
tricity from the clouds? Erman.
Dear Erman: Scientists agree that it should be
called Stolen Thunder.
Stolen Thunder
(To a Dance Partner)
A little tulle, a yard of silk,
A lot of skin as white as milk.
Is it wished on? How dare she breathe?
A little cough ! Good evening, Eve !
--EIx.
Famous Closing Lines
"I have wonderful taste for women," boasted the
Milo cigarette. ERM.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oo
a. mn., 7:00 a. in., 8:o0 a. in., 9:o0 a. Mn. and
hourly to g:o5 p. mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 p. m.
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m,, 7:00 a.
mn. and every two hours to 9 :oo p. in., i 1.00
p. m. To Ypsilanti only- :4o p.' m., 12:25
a. mn., 1:15 sa. im.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:s. a. m., 2:4e
To Jackson and Kalamazoo--Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a.n'.,'12:47, 2.47, 4:47.
To Jackson and Lansing - Limited: 8:47
p. M.
1922 JANUARY 1922
S Ii T W T F S
1 2 3 4 6 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 18 14
16 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 28 24 26 26 27 28
29 89 81
HATS - SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced prices.
Turned inside out, with all new tr.n-
ings they areyas good as new. High
class' wiork only.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

Read Michigan Daily Ads and you You'll find many bargains when you
will buy wisely.-Adv. read Michigan Daily Ads.-Adv.

REUCIONS ON ALLso
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Featuring at Clearance Sale PrIces

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NOTICE
Have you some furniture
needing repairing?
CALL
ANN ARBOR
FURNITURE CO.
Phones 2059 - 2347-W
209-211 N. FOURTH AVE.
YOU, MR. STUDENT
should have use for
a typewriter. You
can rent one from us
Vfor three months for
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can rent with privi-
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any time up to six
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all rent you have
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gation to buy. This offer is made to
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own a machine after first renting.
Your Choice of Makes
State your choice: Underwood, Rem
ington, L. C. Smith. etc. Every machine
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Get Our Prices
We save you So per cent and up on type-
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from-the largestselected stock of ma-
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YOUNG TYPEWRITER COMPANY
25 W. Lake St.. Dept. 234, Chicago
Phone Central 46

J. -. O'Kane

Get 'Em From
Men's - Shoe - Shoppe
335 S. MAIN ST.

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How Should a Roast

BeRolled?
When a roast is rolled as* it should be
it comes from the oven with all the
juicy tenderness that it ever had -
but when it is rolled wrong, you know
the result.

LET EXPERIENCED BUTCHERS
CUT AND ROLL YOUR MEAT
ORDER FROM
A.R. 1G FELL

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PHONE 393

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EFFECTIVE AT ONCE
Price Reduction on Records
V ICTOR 10-inch and 12-inch Black La-
bel Double - faced Records which
have heretofore sold at 85c and $1.35
respectively' will now sell at 75c and
$1.25 respectively.
B RUNSWICK 10-inch Records, former-
ly 85c, now 75c.

3fluwr~iitti

I~ILq *JIW

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EUo 1 -6a15 Eatitliam 0 trrrt

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