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January 20, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
COLDER; PROBABLY
SNOW TODAY

tY

Mwr

tu

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WI
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 85 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1922 PRICE FIVE cm

HILROAD REFORM
IN CHINA IS ARMS
CONFERENCE A IM
CHINESE AND JAPANESE COME TO
TERMS ON STRATEGIC
HOLDINGS
SECRET TREATIES MAY
BE REVEALED TO WORLD
Crucial Wedge Formed by Committee
Against Discriminatory Prac-
tices
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 19.-Pushing for-
ward rapidly towards the conclusion
of its labors the Far Eastern com-
mittee of the Washington conference
today reported a crucial wedge against
discriminatory railroad practices in
China and thus gave general approval
to the provision that the whole multi-
tude of treaties and understandings
relating to China's interests be made
public to the world.
The subjection for a show down of
all Chinese commitments came from
the American delegation.
Come to Terms
Japan's rights to the former Ger-
man cable in the Kiaochow lease hold,
the Chefoos Tsingtao and the Tsingtao
Shanghai lines were renounced by the
Japanese delegates at a meeting with
the Chinese delegates on the question
of Shantung.
A third cable which runs from
Tsingtao to Sesebo, Japan, and was
constructed by Japan after her occu-
pation of the former German lease
hold will be operated by the Chinese
and Japanese point commissions sub-
ject to terms under existing contracts
to which China is a party.
Wireless Handed Over
The Chinese delegates also agreed
to hand over to Japanese control sub-
ject to compensation, two wire'ess sta-
tions on the lease hold, one at Tsinan-
fu and another at Tsingtao at the ino-
ment the Japanese troops are with-
drawn from these points.
The five power treaty for limita-
tion of naval armament has undergone
further changes in the course of a
final overhauling by experts and now
is competely set for the articles es-
tablishing a fortifications status quo
In the Pacific.
APIGTRCTS NEAR COMPLETION
With the securing of five acts, each
containing an original idea, the Spot-
light vaudeville is almost ready for
its appearance next Tuesday night in
Hill auditorium. William W. Mich-
aels, '22, who is directing the affair,
has a number of tryouts during the
last few days and the bill is now al-
most complete with acts that have
proved themselves to be worthy of
produc
The program as it appears now
will include a wide variety of enter-
tainnent, being composed of feature
acts, monologues, singing and danc-
ing pieces, and a big musical act by
some of the well known talent on the
campus. James J. Johnson, '23, will
appear alone in a singing and playing
act which has received the approval
of professional critics. The next num-
ber on the tentative program is a
comedy skit with unique electrical
features. This act is entirely new and
although it has never before been pre-
sented publicly, careful practice has
made it perfect. A monologue by
William L. Sunderland is sure to
prove a success.

Tickets for the Spotlight will go on
sale tomorrow at Graham's and
Wahr's book stores and will be for
sale on the campus Monday and
Tuesday.
bas Company's Books Will Be Audited
Members of the state public utilities
commission will audit the books of
the - Washtenaw Gas company of this
city Jan. 25, as a result of a request
made by the president of the company,
according to Roscoe Bonisteel, city at-
torney.

Famous Ar'ists
Plan Symphony
Concert JNonda
Works of Glinka, Rimsky-Korsa
koff, and Rachmaninoff will make u
the program of the Detroit Symphony
orchestra at 8 o'clock Monday nigh
in Hill auditorium. In the strictly or
chestral numbers Ossip Gabrilowitscl
will act as conductor, while in the
numbers for piano and orchestra h
will take the solo part, putting the
orchestra in charge of Victor Kolar
The three composers represented
on the program are of the Russian
school, Glinka being the father o
Russian music, and Rimsky-Korsa-
koff and Rachmaninoff being of the
modern school. Glinka was born in
1804, and during the 53 years of his
Iif- put Russian music on a working
ba is. His most famous works are
the operas, "Russian e Ludmilla,
from which the number on Monday's
program is taken, and "Life for the
Czar."
' -msky -Korsakoff was born at
Tikhven, Russia, in 1844, and died ear-
ly in the twentieth century, leaving a
largehnumber of compositions. The
"Sheherazade" suite on the pro-
gram, written In 188, shows his pref-
erence for the freer forms of music
such as the symphonic suite and the
tone poem.
Rachmaninoff is still living and has
become famous as a pianist, composer
and leader of orchestra.
FUNERAL SERICES
FOR BEMAN TODAY
Mathematics Classes Dismissed Yes-
tefrday as Body Lay in
State
RECEIVED HIGH TRIBUTE FROM
REGENTS FOR FAITHFUL WORK
Private funeral services for Prof.
Wooster W. Beman, whose death oc-
curred early Wednesday morning, will
be held at 2:30 o'clock today at the
home at 813 East Kingsley street.
Classes in the mathematic depart-
ment of the engineering college were
dismissed yesterday afternoon in mem-
ory of the man who had served that
department for more than half a cen-
tury From 2 to 6 o'clock the body
lay in state at the home, and many
students and friends called to pay
their respects.
At a special meeting of the Board
of Regents last June, the following re-
solution was passed on the occasion of
Professor Beman's completing his 50th
year of continuous service to the Un-
iversity:
"Whereas, Wooster W. Beman, a
graduate of the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts of the University
of Michigan, with the class of 1870,
has been a member of teaching staff
of that college for 50 continuous years
and since 1887 head of the department
of mathematics; and
"Whereas, He has been a teacher of
scholarly interests, whose work has
been successful to a rare degree; and
Whereas, He has ever been untiring
in his devotion to the best interests of
his alma mater; therefore, be It
"Resolved, That the Regents of the
University congratulate Prof. Beman
upon the happy completion of this
half-century of University service, and
express to him their full appreciation
of the work which he has done."
BETA THETA PI WINS FIRST
PLACE IN SWIMMING CONTEST
Beta Theta Pi won the interfrater-
nity swimming contest, scoring 45 1-2

points at the city Y. M. C. A. pool last'
night, by taking third place in every
event except the fancy diving contest
and the plunge for distance.
Gow, national interscholastic free l
style champion, and W. Kerr were the
outstanding stars and had much to do
in giving the Betas the championship.
The other scores follow:
Sigma Chi 9, Delta Chi 5, Kappa
Beta Psi 4, Phi Sigma Delta 4, Delta
Tau Delta 3, Delta Kappa Epsilon 3,
and Alpha Chi Rho 2 points.

MICHIGAN MEETS CHICAGO IN CENTRAL
DEBATE LEAGUE CONTEST HERE TONIGHT

Question Involves Kansas Plan
Settlement of Industrial
Disputes

for,

I

DECISION WILL BE RENDERED
AT CONCLUSION OF SPEECHES
Michigan's hopes for winning the
affirmative side of the proposition:
"Resolved: That the Kansas Indus-
trial Court Plan for settling indus-
trial disputes should be adopted
throughout the United States" rest
with the work of R. R. Johnson, '23,

year the teams did not speak on a
competitative basis. The return of the
decision debates comes from the de-
sire of the majority of the universi-
ties in the Central Debating league
to reinstate them.
Professor Atkins, of the University
of Chicago faculty, will accompany
the representatives of that school.
These men are: Stanley Turnquest,
George Olmstead, and Jerome Hall.
Judge Ira W. Jayne, of the Circuit
court of Detroit, will preside at the
debate, follwing which there will be

i

MICHIGAN'S AFFIRMATIVE TEAM-FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: RALPH
R. JOHNSON, '23, EDWARD T. RAMSDELL, '23, AND GEROGE E.
BIGGE, '22.

E. T. Ramsdell, '23, and G. E., Bigge,
'23, when they debate with the repre-
sentatives of the University of Chi-
cago at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill audi-
torium, in the twenty-fifth annual
contest between participants in the
Central Debating league.
Judge A. H. Miller, Lloyd T. Wil-
liams, and Howard Lewis, of Toledo,
will judge the contest which marks
the return of adjudged debates. Last

an informal reception at the Union
for members of the teams.
Michigan will be represented to-
night in Evanston, where the Varsity
debaters will present the negative side
of the same proposition which the
teams debate here. The men compet-
ing against the debaters of the
Northwestern university are: Gerrit
Demmink, '23, G. . Densmore, '22,
and Paul. Rehmus, '23.

fIrishftPlayers
Act Today For
League Benefii
Intellectual Michigan will turn ou
en masse to see "'The White Headed
Boy".as presented by the Abbey thea-
ter group of Irish players at 2:15
o'clock this afternoon in the Whitney
theater.
The Abbey theater of Dublin was
the first repertory theater to be es-
tablished in the English speaking
countries. It was founded in 1903 by
Miss Horiman, who bought it and
presented it to the National Irish
Theater society.
By means of this long period of
playing together, this group of act-
ors have developed an entirely new
technic and individualism of style. It
was partly due to their efforts in the
presentation of dramas involving
Irish traditions and customs that a
feeling of national consciousness was
aroused in the breasts of the Irish
people.
"The White Headed Boy" is a gay
and delightful comedy of Irish home
life, in which the peculiarities and in-
tricacies of human life are brought
out vividly, while the worn-out Amer-
ican eleemnt of human passions is en-
tirey disregarded.
The performance is being given un-
der the auspices of the Ann Arbor
branch of the American University
Women, the proceeds of which will
be donated to the new Women's
League building.
F0OM TO ISCUSS
CO-OP STORE PLAN
Faculty Men M¢4et Tonight to Con-
sider Advisability of Project
Here
INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE
WILL REPORT ON FINDINGS
Discussion of the advisability of es-
tablishing a co-operative store at the
University will b ethe main work of
the University Forum when it meets
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in Natural
Swence auditorium.
Attention has been called to the
fact that the Forum cannot Itself or-
ganize such a store, it being merely
a discussion body. The Forum has
determined upon the subject of the
co-operative :store becau~)w It feels
that the problem is one which inter-
ests the students and faculty of the
University. Should the material which
will be presented at the meeting of the
Forum tonight show that a co-oper-
ative store is desirable and should the
discussion favor the establishment of
such a store, steps probably will be
taken by men interested in the proj-
ect to incorporate.
Will Take No Aeton
"There is some misundestandng as
to the relation of the University For-
um to the project of organizing the
proposed store," declared Martin - I.
ten Hoor, of the English department
of the engineering school, who is the
chairman of the committe which has
collected the material which will be
presented at the meeting tonight. "As
a body the Forum will merely dis-
cuss the advisability of the project."
The discussion of the evening will
be based on the reports which were
received from the c-operative store
at other universities and colleges
throughout the country. Among the
most successful of these are the
stores at Yale, Harvard, Ohio State,
Illinois, Indiana, Texas, Leland Stan-
ford, and California. At all of these
places, it has been pointed out, the
(Continued on Page Eight)
IM Vi1RSITY WOMEN INVITED
TO HEAR MRS. H. W. PEABODY

College and club women of Detroit,
will give a luncheon in honor of Mrs.
H. W. Peabody, of New York and Bos-
ton at I o'clock Wednesday, Jan. 25,
at the Hotel Statler, Detroit. After the
luncheon Mrs. Peabody will speak on
"Union Colleges of the Orient."
Reservations may be made here
prior to Monday, Jan. 23, by telenhoin-
ing to Mrs. J. W. Welton, 1466-R.
There will be a charge of $1.25 per
plate. A, special invitation * ex-
tended to University women.

DRIVE FOR SICIAD
FUNDS FAILS TO
REAIZE $4000
CAMPAIGN WILL BE EXTENDED IN
ATTEMPT TO REACH
GOAL
TOTAL OF $2052.50 IS
REPORTED LAST NIGHT
Today Will be Designated "Clean Up"
Day with All Subscriptions
Expected in
With but $2,052.50 of the necessary
$4,000 turned in at a late hour last
night, the officials of the S. C. A. drive
decided to extend the campaign an-
other day.
Today will be the "clean-up" day
of the drive. All fraternities who
have not contributed are urgently re-
quested to send in their pledges by 7
o'clock tonight. Solicitors will make
a final effort to raise the required
amount and will spend the day visit-
ing men who have not yet been seen
and in obtaining donations from stu-
dents who have not contributed..
Reports were still coming in when
The Daily went to press last night
so, that it is expected that today's cam-
paign will raise the total amount to
$3,500.
The three high men for yesterday
were J. B. Well, '24, with $58, Stanton
Ellitt, '23, with $47, and Wendel Her-
rick, '23, with $41.50. The high team
for yesterday, headed by Edward T.
Ingle, '22, had a total of. $162.50.
Fraternities Report
The fraternities that have already
subscribed to the fund are: Delta
Kappa Epsilon $30.75, Theta Delta
Chi $26.25, Delta Upsilon $26.25, Phi
Delta Theta $26.25, Psi Uusilon $26,
'Phi Kappa Psi $25.50, Phi Kappa Sig-
ma $25; Delta Sigma Phi $24; Sigma
Nu $22.50, Alpha Delta Phi $21, Beta
Theta Pi $21, Alpha Sigma Phi $18.75,
Phi Sigma Delta $18, Kapap Sigma
$15.75, Chi Psi $15, Phi Epsilon
'$13.50, Sigma Phi $7.50, and Psi Ome-
ga $3.15.
TODDOONATES. 18 RARE
OUMES TO UNIVERSITY
BIRD BOOKS, BOTANICAL FOLIOS
HAVE BEAUTIFUL BINDINGS
COLORED PLATES
Announcement was made yesterday
at the Library of the donation to the
University, by Hon. H. M. Todd, of
Kalamazoo, of 79 rare volumes. -Most
of these are folios of value because'of
the wonderfully colored plates and
beautiful bindings. The 79 volumes
contain a total of 3,162 full size, col-
ored plates. The new books will be
placed on exhibition in the near fu-
'ure.
Many Bird Books
Of most interest and beauty are the
.hree sets of works by John Gould,
famous Engish ornathologist. "Birds
of Australia" is a seven volume set,
published in 1848, containing 681
plates. A supplement to this set, pub-
fished in 1869, is included.
"Monograph of Trochilidae, or 4a-
.ly of humming birds," published in
1861, is in five volumes and containa.
360 plates. The third is in one volume;
"Monograph of Trogonidae, or family
of Trogons." It was published in 1875
and contains 47 plates.
The volumes of these three sets are
bound in full morocco leather with
full gilt backs. Mr. Todd previously
(Continued on Page Eight)

_ ___. _.. __ i

'MORE INTEREST SHOIN
IN -SCENARIO CONTEST
MANY STUDENTS CONSULT WITH
MOVIE REPRESENTATIVE
FOR ADVICE
Real interest among students in the
scenario contest being carried on by
The Daily for the University's cflicial
motion picture is evidenced by the
number who interviewed the repre-
sentative of the producers yesterday
on his arrivel in Ann Arbor. More
students visited the reading rooms of
the Press building during the after-
noon to consult as to the producibil-
ity of their plots than came during
the whole period of the first scenario
contest.
Those that have already been sub-
mitted for consideration show a no-
ticeable improvemnt in style and dra-1
matic possibilities, according to the!
judges. The entrants have been at-
tempting less descriptive work and'
developing more the ideas that form
the basis for their stories. The "rah-
rah" college life of the ordinary movie
is being avoided and a real attempt
is to be noted in several instances to
portray the studious and serious side!
of college activity.
It is again emphasized by the judg-C
es that the idea for the movie i's pri-
marily sought in the present con-
(Continued on Page Eight)
BISHOP WILL SPEAK BEFORE
UNIVERSITY WOMEN SATURDAY
Librarian W. W. Bishop will address
the members of group 1 of the Ann
Arbor branch of the American Asso-
ciation of University Women, in room
11.0 of the Library, at 3:30 o'clock Sat-
urday afternoon. The lecture will be
illustrated. Following this the asso-
ciation and their guests will be shown
through the building.

DISTRIBUTION Of HOP
iTICKETS BEGINS TOA

700

APPLICATIONS APPROVED
AND RETURNED BY
COMMITTEE

Tickets for the J-Hop will be sold
to 700 of the number applying .for
them, according to R. D. Gibson, '23,
chairman of the ticket committee.
They will be sold on Friday and Sat-
urday, each man securing his ticket
at the hour specified on his accept-
ance. Accepted applications should be
brought with the applicant when he
buys his ticket in order to facilitate
the work of distributing so large a
number of tickets.
Tickets for the Hop are positively
non-transferable, that is no one may
purchase a ticket and then sell it to
someone else. Those who have tick-
ets which they are unable to use may
return them to the committee and
have their money refunded.
It was found necessary to refuse
more than 200 applications for tick-
ets, the applicants for some of which
were juniors. In many cases the ap-
plications stated that the dues had
been paid but when the class treas-
urer had been consulted it was found
that such was not the case. Also ac-
ceptances were not sent to many who
it was found had an insufficient num-
ber of hours to be considered juniors
even though they had spent three
years on the campus. Those juniors
on the campus who registered at the
beginning of this year as freshman
laws were also refused as next year
they will be junior laws and ,will
have a chance to attend next year's
Hop. All sophomores and freshmen
as well as a few seniors who applied
for tickets have had their applica-
tions refused.

i
{
;

GUEST LISTS FOR HOP
EXTRA H
All organizations whose lists
of guests for the Junior Hop are
to appear in the Hop extra must
mail or bring to the editorial of-
fices of The Daily a typewritten
list of guests not later than Mon-
day evening, Feb. 6. No lists will
be received after that time, but
any necessary corrections in the
original lists will be made.

oriinl lst wllead.
I

1
.

Hill Auditorium
Monday Eve.
January 23

OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH-Conductor and Pianist
IN A BRILLIANT ALL-RUSSIAN PROGRAM, WITH

Tickets:

The Detroit

Symphony

Orchestra

50c, $1.00,
$1.50 and
$2.00

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