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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 19, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPE 7OF THE UIVIR&ITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every mornin except Monday during the Waiver
sity year by the Board in Control of student Publications.
MZMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The A.sociatea Press is exolus entitled to the use for-
reblato of all newts ispatches cted to it er sot otherwise
creditedin thispaprandthelocal news published therein.
Entered at the postoce at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Subscription by Carrier or mall, 13.50.
Offices: Ann ArboerPress building,Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2404.

munications not to exceed 3oo words, if signed, the sig-
at necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
d notices of events will bepublishe d in The Daily at the
n' of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
1 communic~tions will receive no consideration. No man-
Mill be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
n the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414

m

MANAGING EDITOR ...... # BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor ................................. N. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R. Z. Adams C. P. Overtos
John P. Dawoon M. B. Stahl
Adward Lainbrecht. Paul Watzel
Qditorial Board Charman .............. . ..I. Armstrong Kern
assistants-
Lee Hershdorfor E. R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine ditor....... ..........Thornten W. Sargent, Jr.
exchange Editor..........................George E. Sloan
Iduuic Editor...................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor ............................... George Reindel
Women's FEditor .' .."....... ... . . .. E lizabeth Vickery
Humor Rditor ..../............. ........ R. Meis.

Assistants
Kingsey S. AnderssouL. L. Fenwick
Maurice Berman Dorothy G. Geita
Cecil R. Betrou H. B. HGrundy
jjack D. Briscoe &adyebetkhdeath
.B. Butler Winona A. Hibbard
R. N. Byers Harry-D. Hoed
A. D. Clark. Agnes, Holmquast
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett
P. Costock Marion "Kerr
obert CL. S.
Evelyn. J. Couglin M. A. Klaver~
JahnP. Dawson Victor W. Klein
.ADonahue Marion Koch
W. F. Elliott George E. L.ardner

indication of having been thoroughly cleansed and
washed in hot water, as general sanitation rules re-
quire. The condition which obtains here is -dis-
graceful to say the least, and has been allowed to
continue far too long already.
Perhaps what is needed is a tightening of health
regulations, or a stricter adherence to the essential
demands = of cleanliness on the part of eating-house
owners and employes. These failing, however, the
student patron can do much to help remedy the sit-
uation, by registering prompt complaints - to the"
managements or, finally, by transfering his patron-
age to those establishments which are known to use
only the most sanitary methods possible. It is at
least time that restauranteers were compelled to
keep their hands clean when dispensing food.
THE SPELLING BEE RETURNS
The Detroit News of late has become a patron
of higher education. Whether its new policy of en-
couraging accuracy in the spelling of school children
by arrangingspelling contests with dictionaries as
prizes is merely an advertising stunt or a far seeing
effort ultimately to improve the spelling of its edi-
torial and reportorial staffs, is not entirely clear.
But, whatever the reason, ,the plan would seem to
be of some value.
The three R's have long been the chief adorn-
ments of the curricula of, primary schools. With
these three elements as a foundation, higher educa-
tion can rear its pinnacles to whatever dizzy heights
it pleases - and spelling is the handmaiden of all
the fundamentals.
That the grammar school pupil finds the task of
dissecting words boresome, however, is apparent in
the character of his spelling, when he attains to the
dignity of a collegian. A large percentage seem
to ,favor individualism, where whim, caprice, and
possibly laziness, combine to give them a rather
remarkable originality in their spelling. Ask any
rhetoric instructor.
If the News, by its plan, can really succeed in
mixing a dash of interest with a pinch of advance-
ment, and in injecting the whole into the round of
studies under which school children labor, it will
have done something which modern education has
tried to do, and yet has failed largely to accom-
plish. The spelling bee of the old days, perhaps,
was not such a childish affair after all.
"Cop", a New York police dog, was dragged into
court not long ago for failure to wear his muzzle.
He was subsequently discharged, but the incident
calls to mind a one-time statement of the University
that no dogs would be allowed on the campus.
Michigan's informal hockey team deserves an un-
usual amount of credit for two victories and for
holding down Notre Dame, one of the best of col-
legiate ice squads, to an overtime contest.
This is thrift week. But let not trips to Detroit,
local blow-outs among the Upper Ten, or prepa-
rations for the J-Hop be halted on that account:
the Governor will pay the bills.

I: REDUCTIONS ON ALL
irr BOOK:t
was AT @rar
GRAHAM'S I

B. H. Lee
Robert M. Loeb
j. ]. Mack
athrine Montgomery
R. C. Moriarty
s ]
R. B. Tarr
Virginia Tryon
Dorthy jWhipple
L. L. if ost
J. B. You"g

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone NM
BUSINESS MANAGER .... ... VERNON F. HILLURY
Advertising ....................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
-ublication- -... ... NathanW. Robertson,
Accouts:....*.. . ... ............. John J. Hamel, Jr.
Circulation .................................. Herald C. Hunt
Assistant.
Butr L. Robbis Richard Cutting H. Willia Heidbreder
W. Cooley ames Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
Z, Beauont Pars Maurice Moule J. A. Dr
WaterSchetrr Martin Godring RichardHeidaann
Zdw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wlfe
David Park Paul Blum
THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 1922
Night Edtor-EDW. F. LAMBRECHT
Assstant--M. A. Kaver
Proofreaders-R. M. Loeb
M. E. Gordon
MAKING IDEALS COUNT
E. J. Ottaway, editor and owner of the Port Hu-
ron Times-Herald, in an address delivered before
prospective journalists Sunday afternoon at the
Union, warned the uniersity undergraduate against
attempting to reform the entire newspaper world
the first week or two after he leaves college. It
cannot be done, he says. Mr. Ottoway suggests, in
fact, that the way for a man to succeed is for him
always to 'keep his own ideals high, ,and then, by
constantly endeavoring to learn and to advance, he
finally may see the results of his owninfluence and
may find some of his proposed reforms put into
practice.
Much common sense is embodied in the sugges-
tion, though the idea has a very general application
and certainly need not be limited to journalism.
Whether the student is preparing to enter business
or one of the professions, the idealistic theories of
the classroom are constantly being drilled into him
by professors and instructors. Although this is ex-
cellent, nevertheless, he is apt to become so imbued
with the theoretical that he may disregard entirely
the practical side, much to his own final detriment.
It is unfortunate that, when the cash side of busi-
ness conflicts with one of the pet theories of the
classroom, the former as a rule must predominate.
Reforms and new systems no doubt are needed
in every line of endeavor, but the college graduate
is in a peculiar situation with reference to business
or the professions. Though his services are de-
sired, the world at large has a tendency to be skep-
tical of his capabilities and of the value of his early
achievements. It will hearken to his ideas only
after he has proved his worth in competition with'
the best the world can offer. Nevertheless, by seek-
ing to do his work to the best of his ability and to
uphold and strengthen his own standards, he ulti-
mately may convert some of his early dreams into
realities.
HAND TO MOUTH
The purpose of a restaurant or any eating estab-
lishment is to serve food, to those who want it and
have the necessary wherewithal to pay for it, in the
most sanitary manner and under as clean, whole-
some conditions as possible. This is a fact which
Ann Arbor restauranteers seem to have overlooked,
for the method of dispensing food here is far from'
satisfactory. This is truly an unfortunate situa-
tion, for the majority of students who patronize
local establishments have no choice in the matter
but to accept what is offered them. Should they be-
come dissatisfied with one place, they try the next,
but frequently with no better results - the fault is
a common one.
Dishes seem to be very carelessly washed and
dried in many instances. Again, waiters seem to
e of the opinion that the best way to pass out
spoons or knives or forks is handle first, whether
their own fingers be greasy or not. Coffee is often
served in cups that bear finger prints or other no.
ticeable marks, while plates and bowls give little

loth Stores

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars -6:oo
a. in., 7:oo a. m.,8 :oo a. n., :oo a. m. and
hiourly to o:05 p. mn.
Jason Expre Cars (local atop. of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
'q: . p"M.
Loa Cars East Boun"-i :S m., 7 :oo a.
rn. and every two hours to g:oo p. i., 11.00
>. m. To Ypsilanti only-i 1:4o p. aL.. t:25
a. mn, c :, 5a. in.
ToSaline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :S. a. M., 2:44
u. M.
To Jackson and 4alan4aoo-.Linited cars:
To Jackson and Lansing - Lmted: 8:47
. m.
1922 JANUARY 1928
S 1 T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
s 9 10 11 12 13, 14
1s 16 17 18 19 to0,31
22 N8 24 3 N 36 37 38
29 30 81
NOTICE TO XEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pro-war prices. Hats turned
Inside out, with all new trimmngs,
are as good as new.
FACTORY NAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1799
Patronise our Advertisers..-Adv.
Headquarters for
Da nc'e: and
Banque
Pro g ra ms
Di Luxe
New Lines in
Paper, Leather, Wood
and Celluloid
Ther
Mayer- Schaurer
Company
112 South Main Street

THE

!

S

AT LANE HALL

Same high quality of food..

Lower prices.

Good music 5:30-6:30 every evening

r .
I Try Some ofThat u
- MdRihinteI
- K"
I- y
iK
- w{
i M3.
F - ,
a -
wwa
- w

.
:n.

)

INN

I

'I

The cinders are getting cool.
em up!

All out to warm

Vie Telescopej
The Flapper's Complaint
Last week
My William
Asked me
For a date
For last night
And I said I wouldn't
Be in town
So he said
He guessed he'd study
That evening
And I said he
Was stringin' me
But he said
He meant it .......
Well last night
I saw him
At the Union
Now what'd you do
To William
For pullin'
A stunt like that?
Mermaid.

I

._ .-
,,
,.
._
.. a 1

NEW SPRING STYLES ARE ARRIVING !

4, -'/
0

LX

}i

I .

a

-I

.

It Is Rumored
That Michigan backs her teams
when they are winning.

wvonderfully
i

Quoth Eppie Taffs
Here lieth the body of Frederick Knave
Who swore at a barber while getting a shave,
Oh forever and aye will his memory stand'
And his fame shall be granted in every land,
For 'tis said that poor Frederick was duly engraved.
-Lye Keck.
Gloomy Advice
Dear Erm: I am to be graduated from the Engi-
neering college in June. What city do you think
would be most suitable for my profession?
Yours, Paulus.
Dear Paul: For your profession Pittsburgh is
the most sootable city we can suggest. Hoping you
will entrust us with some of the other secrets in
your life, we remain, yours truly.

/1

,!
t
1

Corbett's Great Clearance Sale
Continues a Few Days More!
POSITIVELY ASTOUNDING VALUES ARE OFFERED FOR
QUICK DISPOSAL. ALL OF OUR WINTER STOCK, SUITS,
OVERCOATS, MUFFLERS, MUST GO
Suits, $28-50, $34.50 Overcoats, 1-3 Off
SEE CORBETT BEFORE YOU BUY
NEED A NEW HAT? NEW ONES ARRIVED YESTERDAY!
TOM CORBETT
116 EAST LIBERTY Where Fitformr Clothes are Sold

Pamous Closing
"Gambolling on the green,"
as he bet $To on the freshman

Lines
said the sophomore
basketball team.
ERM.

11

Iw

a

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