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January 19, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATI
W AND COL'.
TODAY

HER
DER,

L

'AS~ iIr 1an

K'ah t

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY A"D NIGHT WIZ
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 84 ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS

il
PROF. BEMAN DIES
AFTER 50 YEARHS]
. COLLEGE SERICE
DEATH YESTERDAY MORNING]
DUE TO ATTACK OF ACUTE l
ARTHRITIS]
RECORD UNEQUALED BY
ANY OTHER PROFESSOR
Gained National Reputation as Writer;
Author of Many]
Books
Prof. Wooster Woodruff Beman,
head of the mathematics department
of the literary college, died at 5
o'clock esterday morning, at his
home, s1 E. Kingsley street, death
being due to complications resulting
froin' an attack of acute arthritis suf-
fered early last summer. Hjs death
caihe as a distinct surprise to the
University community, as the serious-
nessof his condition was known only
to a few.
orn in 180
Last June Professor Beman complet-
ed 50 years of continuous service to
the Universiby, a record of service that
has never been equaled by any other
professor in the history of the insti-
tution.
Professor Beman was born May 28,
1850, in Southington, Conn. He at-
tended school in Valparaiso, Ind., and
entered the University in 1866. In
1870, when barely 20 years old, he
graduated with the degree of Bache-
lor of Arts. After serving for a year
in Kalamazoo college as instructor in
Greek and mathematics, he returned
to the University, receiving the degree
of Master of Arts in 1873. He held
the position of instructor in mathe-
* uatics from 1871 to 1874, when he be-
came assistant professor. In 1882 he
became associate professor, and in
1887 was given full professorial
rank. In 1908 he received the honor-
ary LL.D. degree from Kalamazoo col-
lege-
Married in 1877
On Sept. 4, 1877, he was married to
Ellen Elizabeth Burton, a daughter of
Dr. N. S. Burton, who was for many
years pastor of the First Baptist
church here. For nearly 30 years
their home has been at 813 E. Kings-
ley street., Besides the widow, a son,
Robert, and a daughter, Mrs. Wini-
fred Lange, both of Cleveland, sur-
vivo.
Professor Beman gained a national
reputation as a writer on the history
and teaching of 6ementary mathemat-
ies. His text books, written jointly
with D. E. Smith, were widely and
favorably known as expounding ad-
vanced ideas on the teaching of math-
ematics. Among his works are "Na-
ture and Meaning of Numbers" (from
the 'German), and "Continuity and Ir-
rational Numbers." He was the joint
author, with D. E. Smith, of "Plane
and Solid Geometry," "Higher Arith-
metic," "New Plane and Solid Geome-
try,". "Elements of Algebra," "Acade-
(Continued on Page Eight)

FROST ENDORSES
ABBEY PLAYERS
"The White Headed Boy" will be
presented at 2:15 o'colck tomorrow
afternoon in the Whitney theater by
the Abbey theater group of Irish
players.
The company, which is playing all
of this week in Detroit at the New
Detroit, was persuaded to give this
performance in Ann Arbor by Mrs.
Bredley M. Davis, wife of Professor
Davis, of the botany department, who
is interested in Irish literature.
"This is a wonderful thing for Ann
Arbor, said Robert Frost, thepoet.
when interviewed. " The White
Headed Boy' can in no way be termed
'high-brow,' but, despite this fact, it
brings to Michigan's doors the best
that can be had in Irish literature and
dramatics."
OPEN DOOR POLICY
AC 9CEPTED lN PART
Far Eastern Committee Approves
Plan But Strikes Out Inquiry
Provision

i 1

DUCK THAT

SUNDAY

SCHOOL VIEWPOINTI

At a certain stage of his life the average Michigan student
was bundled up each Sunday and sent straggling unwillingly
to Sunday school in order that he might learn the precepts of his
religion as every child should know them. Since then he has
been inclined to look upon any religious organization in a sim-
ilar light, - a band of conscientious, but misled men who de-
sire to hand out dogma instead of baseball equipment, and
whose purpose is purely and solely to teach religion.
With only one day of campaigning left in its drive for
$4,000, the Student Christian association has managed to obtain
the meager sum of $1,009.50 from an unresponsive student body.
"Times are hard," is the answer. "If people want religion let
them go to church." Shades of Sunday school!
The giver of such excuses neglects the S. C. A. lecturers
who spread Michigan's fame in surrounding communities; he
ignores the accommodations offered to all religious denomina-
tions; he fails to consider the prominent national figures in
every field brought to Ann Arbor through the organization; he
forgets entirely the hundreds of students who owe their very
attendance at college to the jobs obtained for them by the S.
C. A. This is not a Sunday school. It is a live, functioning,
and necessary social organization of the student body which
must be supported by that body.
Times are hard, yes. But when one sees the crowded pic-
ture shows and prospering soda dispensaries in Ann Arbor,
and when one witnesses the well-filled week-end trains leav-
ing and returning to Ann Arbor, it is difficult to believe that
the average Michigan student will refuse one dollar to keep a
necessary campus organization upon a running basis. The
S. C. APmust obtain these funds to continue its work. Will you
help put the drive across?
"Pygmalion" Cast Brilliant .In
Acting And Character Portrayal

PLAYERS CLUB TO
GIVE PLAYS JAN. 25
Members of the Players club decid-
ed to postpone the production of the
two plays, "The Wonder Hat" and
"Neighbors," which were announced
in yesterday's Daily as being played
tonight in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
This action was taken because of the
production of "Pygmalion" and the
noise which would be encountered in
the rest of Barbour gymnasium.
These plays will be produced on
next Wednesday night, Jan. 25, ac-
cording to the present plans.
BE[ING SENT OUT

Each Acceptance Indicates Time
Call at Union and Buy
Ticket

to

POWERS PLEDGE NOT TO SEEK
CHINESE INFLUENCE SPHERES
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 18.-The Ameri-
can Open Door program was accepted
in part today by the Far Eastern com-
mittee of the Arms conference, bu'
approval was given only after elim
ination of the provision which it would
have specifically authorized concern-
ing inquiry into existing concession:
in China.
The French, renewing their objec-
tions to reopening the whole field o'
concessions granted in the past.
were seconded by the Japanese, and
the proposal was finally thrown out
entirely at the suggestion of the Brit-
ish. The Chinese reserved the right
to call it up again later.
As adopted, the open door contain-
ed a mutual pledge not to seek a
sphere of influence or monopolies in
China in the future and authorized
the creation of an international board
of reference with power to investi-
gate and report on any plan which
seemed to involve violation of the
principle of equal economic and com-
mercial opportunity.
UNIVERSITY CONVOCATION
ON WASHINGTON'S ,BIRTHDAY
Announcement was made yesterday
from the office of the President that
the services in Hill auditorium on
Washington's birthday, Feb. 22, will
be held at 10 o'clock, and will take
the form of a University convocation.
Prof. H. Finley, former president of
the College of the City of New York
and a prominent eastern educator,
will give the address.
Graduate Women Resume Weekly Teas
The regular weekly teas of the
Graduate Women's club were resumed
yesterday afternoon when the club en-
tertained its members and friends in
the parlors of Barbour gymnasium.

(By Marion Kerr and Delbert Clark)1
Brilliant, almost professional inter-7
pretation of character, with well-
poised life-like acting, combined to
make the presentation last night by'
the Comedy club of Bernad Shaw's
Pygmalion" one of the most pro-
nounced successes in the history of
Michigan dramatics.
House Nearly Full
Playing to a house practically filled,j
the members of the cast appeared ina
he first act in a night scene in
Covent Garden, London, which was
..specially effective both in scenic ad-
tptation and in the skill of the actors,
and throughout the play maintained
the difficult standard which they set'
for themselves in that first scene.'
Seldom if ever has a college produc-
tieu approached so near the excel-
lence which is usually attributed only
b veteran players.
The audience lived the play with
the, cast, laughing, sitting tense and
motionless, or even with eyes moist
from emotion as the story progressed, !
portraying heights and depths of hu-{
nan feeling with a fidelity that was
o say the least remarkable, always
sprinkled with laughter.
The role taken by Mildred Hen-
ry, '22, was exceptionally heavy and
required a decided versatility. Miss
Henry's interpretation of Eliza Doo-
little was astoundingly well done
both in the intelligence of her in-
terpretation and in conveying to the
role a charming personality.
" Comedy Parts Good
Comedy parts were taken by
Richard Forsyth, '22L, in the role
of Alfred Doolittle, and John Hass-
Danees At Union
To Be Separate
As confusion has arisen about the
dance program at the Union tomorrow
night,-Union officials yesterday made
clear that there will be two distinct
functions--the dinner dance betwen
the hours of 6 and 8 o'clock and the
regular Friday evening dance.
The dinner dance will be held in the
main dining room and there will be no
extra charge, other than the charge for
the dinner itself. Most of the tables
will accommodate two couples, while
a few will take care of three couples.
Dress will be informal. A special
four piece orchestra will play at this
dance, which is the first of its kind
ever given by the Union.
Tickets for the regular dance, which
will begin at 9 o'clock tomorrow night
in the assembly hall, are now on sale.

berger, '23, in the part of FreddyE
Eynesford-Hill. The latter part, thatE
of an effeminate tea-hound, was par-r
ticularly well done. Thetheavier com-
edy role taken by Forsyth brought in-f
to play a decided ability to play char-
acter parts.
Henry Higgins, the phonetics pro-
fessor who plays opposite to Mildredt
Henry, while without as much of the
inspiration as was given to the leading,
feminine role played his decidedly dif-
ficult part with increasing brilliance
during the acts.
His second, Colonel Pickering, taken
by Clement E. Smith, '24, was donef
with a grace of manner that revealed,
the skill of the director, Prof. J. Ral-
eigh Nelson.
DEBATERS GO TO
EVANSTON TODAY,
Members of the negative team of
the Varsity debaters, who will repre-a
sent the University in the Central
league debate, will leave Ann Arbor
today for Evanston, Ill.; where they
will contest the proposition, "Resolv-
ed: That the Kansas Industrial court
plan for settling industrial disputes
should be adopted throughout the
United States," with representatives
of Northwestern university on Fri-
day night.
The members of the negative team
are: Gerrit Demminck, '23, G. E. Dens-
more, '22, and Paul Rehmus, '23
These men will debate for the Uni-
versity on the twenty-fifth anniver-
sary of the Central Debating league,
which is composed of the Universities
of Chicago, Northwestern, and Michi-
gan.
This year's debates mark the re-
turn to the adjudged contests which
were in disrepute last year, the no-
decision contests being preferred.
Judge Ira W. Jayne, of Detroit, will
preside at the contest between the af-
firmative team of Michigan debaters
and the Chicago representatives
which will take place at 8 o'clock
Friday evening in Hill auditorium in-
stead of in Sarah Caswell Angell hall
as previously announced in The
Daily.
SENOR MERCADO TO SPEAK
TO LA SOCIEDAD HISPANICA
The fourth of a series of stereop-
tican lectures will be given at 7:15
o'clock tonight in Tappan, hall by
Senor E. A. Mercado under the au-
spices of L.a Sociedad Hispanica.
Senor Mecardo will discuss- life in
his native state of Porto Rico. Ad-1
mission will be 50 cents.

p
HIOPE TO HAVE ALL TICKETS f
SOLD BY SATURDAY EVENING C
All applications for tickets for the f
J-Hop have been checked over and the P
committee has begun to send appli-
ants their answers, which should be p
eceived not later than Friday after- t
noon.a
Each acceptance will indicate a de- p
finite time when the applicant is to call r
at the Union to purchase his ticket.e
At this time the committee requests h
that each person buying a ticket bring t
the exact amount of the ticket, $6 50,t
with him in order to relieve conges-
tion and facilitate matters for the com-c
mittee.y
Unless there is a delay in the ar- E
rival of the invitations the hours when t
each applicant is to purchase his tick-
et will, probably be between Fridayv
afternoon and Saturday evening of this
week. All those whose applications$
for tickets have been accepted, and
who find that they will be unable toI
attend the Hop, should report to theP
committee, which will relieve them of
the undesired tickets.$
Contracts for nearly all of the re-v
quirements of the Hop have been let.
J. H. Hall, of the Detroit Arts and
Crafts studios will do the decorating.
The Spedding studios have receivedf
the contract for photographing the
Hop. The music will include Kennedy's
society orchestra of Ann Arbor, War-
ring's orchestra of Pittsburgh and
New York, and the Wolverine hotel or-
chestra of Detroit, which will be under
the direction of S. G. Pasternacki and
Irvin Rubenstein.N
Tickets for booths at the Hop willt
cost $30 and may be secured after the.
distribution of individual tickets, the
date of which has not yet been an-s
nounced.F
SECOND TECHNIC WITH
NEW MAKEp PPERS
IMPROVEMENT SHOWN IN EDIT.-
ING AND GENERAL STYLE t
OF MAGAZINEt
Making its second appearance under
the new form, the Michigan Technic
!or January displayed even an im-
provement over the previous issue in
editing, makeup, and general finish
of style. A particularly appropriate
cover in color, a view of the Feather,
River canyon, embellished by PaulI
Ketelhut, '22A, immediately attractst
the reader's eye.
Col. J. G. Vincent, bf the Packard]
Motor company, who gained a world
wide reputation during the war by su-
pervising the design of the Liberty
airp'ane motors, wrote the leading;
article entitled "Aerial Transporta-]
tion."
The story which received the first
prize in the Technic's prize story con-
test last fall, broke into print. It was
written by Edward F. Moore, '22E,
under the name "Professionalism in
Engineering."
(Continued on Page Seven)
Gargoyle Tryouts Meet Today
Tryouts for the Gargoyle editorial
staff will meet at 4 o'clock this after-
noon in the Press building. All per-
sons, including first year men, who
are desirious of trying out for the
Gargoyle are ased to be present at
this meeting.

iICA. CAPIGN
LAGS AT CLOSE
OF SECOND DAY
IGURES COMPARED WITH LAST
YEAR'S SHOW DRVE IS
$800 SHORT
RATERNITIES SLOW IN
TURNING IN PLEDGES
)ffcials Hope Amount Will Come
Near Reaching $4,000 Quota
Needed
Final reports for the second day of
.he drive for S. C. A. funds continued
;o be under the totals reported last
rear. The returns including cash and
ledges was $741, bringing the total
or 'the first two days to $1,009.50.
Compared with the figures for the
irst and second days of last year, the
present drive is over $800 short.
Fraternity pledges have been re-
ported slowly, only about a fourthof
the houses having been hear from
At the closing hour last night. House
presidents are requested to have the
reports for their organizations turn.
ed in at the S. C. A. offices in Lane
hall by 7:30 o'clock tonight in order
to facilitate an early computatIon of
the final day's drive.
Up to date the figures do not indi-
cate the possibility of reaching last
year's total, in a three day drive.
However, S. C. A. officials anticipate
that with the addition of pledges from
campus organizations and students
who were not reached on the first vis-
it the total figure will approach the
$4,000 suota.
The three high men in individual so-
liciting for the day were, Stanton E.
Ellett, '23, $33; Victor H. Method,
'23, $31, and Robert Snodgrass, '23,
$26. The high team for the day
which turned in $121 was headed by
Edward T. Ingle, '22.
Orchestra Will
Give Symp hony
Program Mronday
The Detroit Symphony orchestra
will appear in Ann Arbor for the
third time this season at 8 o'clock
next Monday night in Hill auditor-
'um. Ossip Gabrilowtsch will be the
soloist of the evening, with Victor
Kolar in charge of the orchestra dur-
Ing the concerto numbers.
During its first years this orchestra
was a semi-amateur organization and
its members were chosen from among
the bst musicians of its native city.
After a few years of this sort of ex-
istence, it became evident that either
the project should be given up en-
tirely, or that it should be developed
into an organization comparable with
the best in America. This speedily
was made possible through the work
of far-seing art patrons of Detroit.
The greatest factor in their suc-
cess, perahps, was their courage in
securing one of the world's finest con-
ductors, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, to build
im and carry on the orchestra work.
With the large resources set aside for
his use Mr. Gabrilowitsch has welded
together an organization which is rec-
ognized the world over as among the
best.
The program for next Monday night
will be an all Russian one, consist-
ing of selections for the orchestra,
and Rachmaninoff's Second Concerto
for orchestra and piano, Mr. Gabri-
lowitsch appearing in the role of
piano virtuoso.

MILLER TO TALK ON COPPER
AT A. S. M. E. MEETING TONIGHT
Prof. H. W. Miller, of the engi-
neering school, will address the stu-
dent branch of the American Society
of Mechanical Engineers at 7:30
o'clock tonight at the Union, taking a,
his s"bject "The Refining of Copper."
Professor Miller was for some time
connected with the Baltimore Copper
and Smelting company and pronises
some interesting facts about copper
which are not generally known.

i

NEGATIVE TEAM OF THE VARSITY DEBATERS WHICH LEAVES ANN
ARBOR TODAY TO REPRESENT THE UNIVERSITY IN THE CEN-
TRAL LEAGUE -DEBATE AT EVANSTON. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT
THEY ARE: GARRIT DEMMINCK, '23, G. E. DENSMORE, '22, AND
PAUL REHMUS, '23.

U'-

N

HOW

WILL

Y
To M
To T
To D

OU

SPEND

$1,

Fo0r!

Sodas
Movies
Dance

or

e: 5 Poor Kids Happier
:h: 4 High School Students Michigan
slop: 1 United Democratic Ideal
ASSOCIATION IRIVE

STUDENT CHRISTIAN

It

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