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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 15, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY,

U~irirljgan Daily
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER O THE UNIV RITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morrng emejit Monday dunag rb' P Ia.
sty year by the Board in Contv'l of Sudent Pubiiaton,.
MEMBER OF TH TA$SOCl1AT1.1) PIRY
The Associated Press is exclusively entites t the &se for
republicatien of all news dispatcher eredited to it o not otkti* e
creitd i tispaper an" U of rc&.rnes pnblisrhecw
Entered at the potofficte at Ann Aror, Michisn, ae a!*e*
clss matter.
-Sulscripton by carrier a.: mail. c.
Offices: Ann Arbor Pres biling, MaynarJ UStti..
Phones: Business, 960; Edonrial, J.
Communications not to exceed Soo words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to apear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or -ailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscrit will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not"necessaril endorse"the sentiments ex.
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor...............Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor.............................E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editor-
R. E. Adams G. P. Oertn
John P. Dawson M. B,. Stal
E*ward Lamorcht Paul Watze
Editorial Board Chairman.....................L. Armstrong Kern
kesistants-
Leo Hershdorfer P. R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine Editor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor...............................George E. Sloan
-Music Editor..................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor............................... George Reindel
Women's Editor.......................... Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor............ ................ E R. Meiss
Assistants
Kingsley S. Andersson L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
Maurice Berman Dorothy G. Geitz Robert M. Loeb
Cecil R. Betron H. B. Grundy J. L. Mack
{k D. Briscoe Sadyebeth Heath Kathrine Montgomery
W. Butler Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
RN.Byers Harry D. Hoey J. F. Pontius
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmquist Lillian Scher
Harry C. Clark H. ;. IHowlett R. B. Tarr
J P. Comstock Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
Robert W. Cooper L. S. Kerr Dorothy Whipple
E~velyn,J. Couglin M. A. Klaver L. L. Yost
john P. Dawson Victor W. Klein J. B. Young
3.I.A. Donahue Marion Koch
W. F. Elliott George E. Lardner
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960)
BUSINESS MANAGER...........VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising.......................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication.............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ..................................John J. hIamels, Jr.
Circulation ............................. .. Herald C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Ricard Cutting a.a Willis Hidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbrait
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Waltr Scherer ai n Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 1922
Night Editor-PAUL WATZEL
Assistant-L. J. Hershdorfer
Proofreaders-R. W. Cooper
C. R. Betron
MORE INFORMAL CONFABS
Appearing in Thursday's issue of The Daily was
a communication which advocated the holding of
discussion groups between faculty members and
students for the exchange of ideas on politics, litera-
ture, archaeology, science, art, and kindred sub-
jects. Immediately, officials at the Union took ac-
tion in the matter, and have since announced that
if sentiment in most quarters seems to favor it, the
project will be commenced with the opening of the
second semester.
The plan appears to be a good one and to be close-
ly related to, though not in conflict with, that up-
held by the Student Christian association, in foster-
ing discussion groups in fraternity-houses on topics
pertaining to religion, philosophy, and ethics.
The value of discussion between faculty mem-
bers and students on serious topics is easily ap-
paretit. The teacher who functions as a leader is
-apt to have a mature viewpoint. On the other
hand, the student whose opinions will be perhaps
more radical and not so well founded, by being en-
couraged to make his contribution to discussion
ought to derive much benefit. Of course, the op-
portunity presents itself for this sort of thing in
the classroom, but the formal procedure and rou-
tine work there hinders spontaneus expression.
As the writer of the communication indicates, the

student will receive more inspiration from hearing
a faculty man lead in informal consideration of
varying topics than from listening to him for an
hour in the lecture room.
Evidence suggests that the faculty of the literary
college favors the plan for discussion groups. The
range of subjects mentioned is wide enough to be
of likely interest to enough students in and out of
fraternity houses to insure the success of the pro-
ject. Should the plan be inaugurated, it will be
notable that two of-the leading organizations on the
campus will be fostering discussion groups, those of
the Union open to everyone and treating a variety
of subjects, and those of the S. C. A. confined to
fraternity men and limited to topics within the realm
of religion and the like. Every student on the
campus who is interested should be able to find
an outlet for his opinions in one or the other groups.
PANNING THE AMATEUR PSYCHO
Ascertaining what life work is best fitted for,
which hitherto-fore has been the subject for much
deliberation, has been simplified by an amateur
psychologist in Detroit who, by performing a few
simple experiments in psycho-analysis, professes
to be able to tell accurately whether an individual is
fitted to be a banker, an artist, or an ordinary tramp.
This practice appears to be another manifesta-
tion of the tendency, painfully evident in the past
year or two, toward making a popular fad out of
psycho-analysis by applying it to religion, matters
of state, and even love affairs. Such experiments
as those performed by the psycho-analyst in anes-
tion have been proved by authorities, at the Uni-
versity and elsewhere, to be of no determinant value

whatever in finding out what work another is best
fitted to undertake. Science, though it has gone
forward by leaps and bounds in the past century,
has not progressedfar enough as yet to mnake such
a thing possible. Doubtless simply by studying hu-
man nature, a man can acquire some knowledge in
this direction which will be of benefit to himself
and others. But to pass this knowledge on under
the guise of psycho-analysis is asinine.
Psycho-analysis in itself is a highly developed
science and should be left to a few research stu-
dents who are capable of practicing it. It has no
general application and cannot be popularized.
"PYGMALION"
With the announcement recently that the Regents
have authorized the building of a new campus the
ater at the University comes the statement that
Michigan will soon become a leader in the field of
dramatic educational development. But, after all,
by this addition she will be strengthening her form-
er position rather than branching out on any radical-
ly new fields.
In the past, a number of campus organizations
have worked along dramatic lines with exceptional-
ly high artistic aims in mind, and have staged pro-
ductions yearly which combined skill of direction
with almost professonal excellency of acting. They
have been greatly hampered continually by lack of
proper facilities for the handling of plays, and this
need for the proper working tools of the stage will
be taken care of by the new Michigan theater. But
these campus organizations, despite all manner of
difficulties and despite only moderate support from
the campus at large, have labored so consistently
and with such excellent results to raise the stand-
ard of Michigan drama that their efforts have gone
down in the annals of the amateur stage hereabouts
as deserving of the utmost praise.
Notable among the organizations whose work
has reached such a high level of dramatic excellence
are Masques and Comedy club. The former's
"Quality Street," of three years ago, will never be
forgotten, while the productions of the latter have
been such as to bring out annually the most en-
thusiastic expressions of approval from those who
are in a position to know what is good and worth-
while in the drama.
"Pygmalion," the first of George Bernard Shaw's
works to be played here by an amateur cast, is sched-
uled for Wednesday night as this year's offering of
Comedy Club. Eventually, when our theater is an
accomplished fact, this sort of thing is going to "go
big" at Michigan, and certainly the efforts and skill
exhibited by campus dramatic groups in the past
warrent the enthusiastic support of every one who
likes the spice of a good play, well presented.
Two months ago, Detroit newspaper solons were
giving Arthur Brisbanes Times just six weeks to
live; but, with a doubled circulation, the Times ap-
pears to be a rather husky corpse. All of which
goes to prove that Mr. Brisbane being an adept at
the sloppification of red ink, has learned the knack
of capturing the subscription bird by copiously
sprinkling the salt of sensationalism upon its tail.
Step forward men ! Fear not that the chocolate
bars are poisonous or the "Crispettes" damaging to
one's digestive machinery simply because the ladies
sell hair-nets as well as confections at their campus
tables.
If Coach Farrell has to wait much longer for
track material, it might pay us to take on the local
high school as opponents in our first meet.

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.. .m. AT mum
G
-G R A n " "ua a u rr t n n r r t r n r urr tr r n n n ul l n t rtt a t u

p.
Both Stores

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DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arhor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6 :oo
a. i., 7:00 a.. i., 8:oo a. mi., 9::0oa.m. an,
hourly to 9:05 p. mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ans
Arbor), 9:47 a. m. and every two hours t(
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Local Cars East Bound-7s. a.m., 7:oo a
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To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :5 a. n., 2:4
p. M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars.
'x:47, 10:47, a. in., 12:47, 2.47, 4:47-
To Jackson and Lansing - Limited: 8:47
p. Mn.
1922. JANUARY 1922
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 6 4 7
8 9 10 11 12 18 14
16 14 17 18 19 26 21
22 28 24 2b 24 27 28
29 80 81
NOTICE TO MEN
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FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
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WEDG ETYPE
T"IEPRESS
THESPAYTH CO.

Lost something? A Classified Ad in Buy your class toques from Daily
[he Daily will find it for you.-Adv.,t advertisers.-Adv.
Home Cooked Dinners
Served from l1 a. m. to 8 p. m. Every Day. Breakfast from 8 to 11 a. m.
O. K. RESTAURANT
209 East Liberty
New Spring Samples of Imported
Dress Materials now here
U. GOWNS DESIGNED AND MADE .-.
LADIES' ACCESSORIES
THE WISTERIA SHOP
Open Evenings 330 Maynard Street
NEW DETROIT
OPERA HOUSE
ONE WEEK] BEGINNING SUNDAY, JANUARY 15
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY
CHARLES DILLINGHAM Presents
"HAVE The IRISH PLAYERS
MADE From the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, in
TWO "The White Headed Boy"
A Comedy by Lennox Robinson
WORLDS WITH ORIGINAL CAST
Including Maire O'Neill, Arthur Sinclair,
RING Sydney Morgan, Arthur Shields, Maureen
Delany; Norah Desmond, Joseph A. O'-
WITH Rourke, Harry Hutchinson.
Direct from Their Brilliant Season in New York and
LAUGH. Chicago which Subsequented a Run of 300 Perform-
ances at the Ambassadors Theatre, London.
TER" PRE-WAR PRICES
Night, 50c to $2.00; Matinees, 50c to $1.50

IA

tne Telescope
Ode to Three Initials
Our greatest magazines are rot,
The Atlantic Monthly's bunk-don't cuss
Good friend, our literature is not
Destroyed, the Smart Set's still with us.
The Saturday Evening Post's a mess
Of Lardner and of Irvin Cobb,
'Tis rotten balderdash, but bless
Your soul, the Dial is on the job.
Kipling's stories are passe,
But friend, don't worry, do not fret,
For Father Henry writes today,
And Dreiser's pen will save us yet.
What though O. Henry's naught but stuff,
Inferior work whose palm has past;
Don't worry, folks, for 'tis enough.
We still have the Iconoclast.
-Vee Dee.
BR-R-R!
By the way, in connection with Vee Dee, Canada
Harry writes in, "Gee! In this chilly weather,
wouldn't you hate to Bee Vee Dee?"
Another Version
The boy stood on the burning deck,
His damp eye shed a tear,
For the ship was slowly sinking
With a cargo full of beer.
-Teddy Bear.
A Happy Death
Haig-Poor Ed broke his neck yesterday.
& -Zatso ! Huccum?
Haig-He came to a street crossing just as two
flappers were going in opposite directions.
-Benedicte.
Famous Closing Lines
"There's no escape now," exclaimed the officer
as he turned off the gas.
-Erm.

FORT WAYNE,IND
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--
For Evening Dress
- Complete outfits from the most
select lines available. The latest
approved metropolitan styles.
Clothes :: Shoes :: eecessories
WAGNER U COMPANY_
STAT E STREET AT LIBERTY

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