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January 15, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
SNOW FLURRIES AND
COLDER TODAY

L

, t i -gan4:3att

VOL. XXXII. No. 81

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 1922

i

IRISH GOVKER N
Off I C IALDUTIES
NEGOTIATIONS CONCLUDING THE
TREATY WITH ENGLAND FIN-
ALLY TERMINATED
DEPUTIES FROM SOUTH
IRELAND RATIFY PACT
No Representatives of Eamonn de
Valera Constituency at His-
toric Meeting
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Jan. 14.- The provisional
government of the Irish Free state is
now a functioning body.
Finalities relating to conclusion of
the treaty with England were carried
out late this afternoon after an his-
toric meeting in the Mansion house' of
representatives of the southern I-ish
constituency, who formally ratified the
treaty. Eamonn J. Duggan took to
Dublin castle a copy of the treaty
signed by the members of the new gov-
ernment as provided for in the terms
of the peace pact.
Fifty-five, members elected to sit in
the house of commons in Southern Ire-
land, attended the morning meeting.
No one representative nor any of
the other supporters of Eamonn de
Valera, former Republican president,
were present.
First on the list of eight men ap-
pointed as constituting the provisional
government is the name of Michael
Collins, and it is assumed he will be
made the nominal head.
As a matter of fact, however, the
correspondent is authoritatively in-
formed that Arthur Griffith, as pres-
ident of the Dail Eireann and chair-
man of the delegation that negotiated
the treaty, will be looked to as its
supreme authority.
ASK PROMPT ACTION IN
DILY MOVIE CONTSI
ALLOW TWO WEEKS FOR SCEN-
ARIOS TO BE SUBMITTED
TO JUDGES
Immediate action by students in
working out ideas for the Univer-
sity motion picture, for which The
Daily recently reopened a scenario
contest, is suggested by the produc-
ers and the official judging commit-
tee. The competition will close at 6
o'clock on Tuesday, Jan .31, leaving
two weeks for all the work neces-
sary to complete the plot outline, in
a .form suitable for submission to the
judges.
A representative of the producers
will return to Ann Arbor the first of
next week from the company's stu-
dios, where he has been since the
closing of the first scenario contest.
He will be in the reading room of the
Press building at regular hours to be
announced later, and it is suggested
that students or faculty men interest-
(Continued on Page Ten)
MRS. RHEAD TO BE
CONCERT SOLOIST
Mrs. George B. Rhead, pianist, will
be the soloist at the second appear-
ance this season of the University
Symphony orchestra at 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon in Hill auditorium.
The orchestra is under the direction
of Samuel Pierson Lockwood.
Mrs. Rhead will play Cesar Franck's
"Variations Symphoniques" and a
fantasia of Hungarian folk melodies

by Liszt. Both of these compositions
are not only fertile in their wealth
of orchestral melodies, but they offer
unusual opportunities for the display
of brilliant piano virtuosity.
An added feature of the program
will be the performance of "Eight
Dances" which have been composd
by Norman Lockwood, son of Samuel
Pierson Lockwood. Master Lockwood
possesses great musical talent, par-
ticularly in the field of composition.
This occasion will be the first public
performance of any of his works.

Comedy Club Play, "Pygmalion,'"
Modernized Version Of Old Story

There is an old Greek story of a
sculptor who made a beautiful statue
which he grew to love so that one
morning when he bestowed on its lips
a kiss the statue came to life. The
beautiful creature was Galatea and
the artist, Pygmalion.
It was from this myth that Bernard
Shaw named his play and modernized
the plot. His dear Galatea is an ex-
quisitely low-brow little street gamin
who is kissed with culture and pre-
sented to society as a duchess. Her
Pygmalion Is Henry Higgins, a more
than usually eccentric professor, who
believes in phonetics as the pancea

rof all human defects. Henry Hig-
gins' mother is a tailor-made' product
of society. The part is taken by Mil-
dred Chase, '22, leading "man" in the
1920 Junior Girls' play, who is even
more successful in her present fem-
inine role.
Mildred Henry, '22, takes the part
of Eliza Doolittle, the Cockney flower
girl, Shaw's modern Galatea. A native
ability, added to the average of four
or five hours' practice daily has given
a decided'surety to her interpretation
of the role. There is a subtle touch
in her apparently fnconscious blos-
(Continued on Page Ten)

MILDRED HENRY, '22, WHO'
the Leading Role in the
Play Wednesday.

TAKES
Comedy

JENKS ADDRSSES
SERICES TOD Y
Speaker Is head of New Department
of Oriental Commerce at New
York University
IS RECOGNIZED AS LEADER
IN POLITICAL ECONOMY
Prof. Jeremiah W. Jenks, '78, head
of the recently organized department
of Oriental commerce and politics of
New York university, will speak on
"Teachings of Jesus as a Factor in
International Politics" at 7 o'clock to-
night at the University services in
Hill auditorium.
Professor Jenks is considered by
many to be an authority on world poi-
iticci ad has spent much time in
Washington attending the Arms Con-
ference sessions. He was instrumen-
tal in establishing the novel depart-
ment of Oriental commerce and poli-
tics at New York university and it is
'n the Far Eastern questions that
Professor Jenks is especially well
versed. This new department will
concern itself immediately with' the
preparation of students for the carry-
ing on of commerce and other activi-
ties in the Near and Far East. But
there is also a deeper purpose in the
'establishment of the new department.
It is hoped that by so preparing stu-
dents and enabling them to under-
stand the different laws and customs
of the nations of the East, that much
of the disputes between the United
States and the Oriental countries will
eventually be eliminated.
The Commerce club entertained
Professor Jenks at dinner last night
at the Union. Following the dinner
Professor Jenks gave an informal
talk on "The Arms Conference in Re-
lation to the Eastern Question,"
'stressing the relations between China
and Japan.
BOIO DEFRS CTION
ON ROWING QESTION
Definite action on the question of
making rowing an intercollegiate sport
was postponed until late February or
early March at the meeting of the
Board in Control of Athletics held yes-
terday at the Union.
The board heard the report of the
committee investigating the question
and discussed the proposition at
length, but due to the fact that Prof.
Ralph W. Aigler, head of the board,
and James E. Duffy and John D. Hib-
bard, alumni members, were unable to
be present, it was thought best to de-
lay certain action until the next meet-
ing. Meanwhile the committee which
was appointed Dec. 10 to make a study
of the proposition will gather further
information conerning the sport.
The board also deferred extending
the invitation for the intercollegiate
track meet. This will be taken up at
the next meeting. The hockey and
swimming schedules for this year
were approved by the board and will
be announced this week.

PLANSCOMPLETED
FOR S.C.A. DRIVE
President Burton Will Address Meet.
ing of All Committeemen
Monday
CAMPAIGN WITH $4000 AS
OBJECTIVE, OPENS TUESDAY
Final arrangements for the Student
Christian association drive to raise
$4,000 will be made at a meeting of all
team captains and solicitors at 4:30
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in Lane
hall. President Marion L. Burton will
talk to the committeemen about the
campaign and the value of the S.
C. A.
The drive will open early Tuesday
morning and continue until Thursday
night. Every man on the campus
will be asked to contribute his share
of the fund. Many prominent men on
the campus interviewed regarding the
campaign expressed themselves as
being heartily in favor of the plan
and all indications are that the drive
will be one of the most successful
ever carried on in the University. The
students were particularly pleased
with the reorganization of the S. C.
A., with Louis Reimann, '16, former
Varsity footballsstar and member of
the "M" club, as chief of the staff
workers.
; Amount Itemized
Several of the items in the budget
are being published in The Daily each
day so that the campus will know
how much money is needed and just
what' it will be used for.
One hundred dollars are needed for
the World services. Special speake'rs
who have done outstanding work in
foreign countries are brought here to
speak before groups of students as1
well as to interview students on med-
ical, educational and religious work.
These speakers know conditions in
foreign countries and are able to ad-
vise students of any openings there
may be for them. Twelve men will
be here this year.
One thousand and fifty dollars are'
needed for office operation. This money
pays for office help and expenses. No
secretaries' salaries are paid out o
this sum.
Fifty dollars are needed for the
State Student Y. M. C. A. for the pur-
pose of bearing part of the Univer-
sities' share of conducting state stu-
dent conferences such as the Officers
conference and the Christian Callings
conference. The object ofrthe confer- ,
ence is to train men for volunteer,
service at their schools and to present
different lines of Christian life work.
$400 for Summer Work
Fourhundred dollars are needed for
summer conferences. Delegates are
sent to student religious conferences
during the summer where the best and
latest methods of doing religious and
social work in universities is taught.
About 30 representatives of the Uni-
versity will attend conferences next
summer.
Twenty-five dollars are needed for
the Monteith club, composed of stu-
dents who are going into the minis-I
try. The money is spent for speakers
and general expenses of the club.
Twenty-five dollars are needed for
the Student Volunteers. The club is

DN SETTLEMENT,
Chinese and Japanese Delegates Meet
To Discuss Chalochow Re-
sto ation
FAR EASTERN COMMITTEE
EXPECTED TO MEET SOON
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 1.-The Shantung
negotiations took another step forward
today while all of the other activities
of the Arms Conference were at a
standstill.
Meeting for the 26th time since they
began their separate conversation,
the Japanese and Chinese agreed on
some of the preliminary moves look-
ing toward restoration of Chalochow
territory to China.
At the same time there was appar-
ent in some quarters a mounting lope
that the question of the Shantung
railroad, the only point on which the
two delegations have found themselv-
es competely deadlocked would be set-
ted soon on the basis of American
and British compromise suggestions
now under consideration in Peking
and Tokio.
Conference officials were talking to-
night of the resumption of the ques-
tion of the Far Eastern committee next
week although 24 hours before they
had indicated that the committee
would not be assembled until the
Shantung problem had been solved.
SUNDAY SERVICES IN
ANN ARBOR CHURCHS
Marked by. the appearance of a
bishop, a major, an out-of-town pas-
tor, a number of faculty members and
concluding with the head of a large de-
partment of New York university at
the University service in Hill audi-
torium, today's services in local
churches offer a variety and an op-
portunity that should satisfy the most
fastidious of tastes.
Rev. Mahjon Tunison, of Logans-
port, Ind., will occupy the pulpit this
morning in the Baptist church, speak-
ing on the topic "God's Adventure."
The Sunday School and Guild class will
be held at noon as usual. The Guild
will meet at 5:45 o'clock so as to let
out in time to enable all to attend the
service in Hill auditorium at 7
o'clock.
(Continued on page seven)
Prominent Editor
Speaks Tuesday
James Schermerhorn, Sr., of the
Detroit Times, will be the speaker at
the luncheon of the Students' Press
club which will be held at 6:15 o'clock
next Tuesday evening in the Union.
Mr. Schermerhorn has been actively
connected with newspaper work in
Detroit for anumber of years, and is
known especially as an editorial writ-.
er. He has also contributed articles
to various magazines.
Mr.ASchermerhorn has spoken in
Ann Arbor on several previous occa-
sions. His talk' on Tuesday evening
will be devoted to problems of journal-

Es I OTTA WY TO
SPEAK HERE TODAY
State Editor Chooses ''Breaking Into
the News Game" as
Subject
WILL DISCUSS PROBLEMS OF
JOURNALISM AS PROFESSION
E. J. Ottaway, '94, editor of the Port
Huron Times-Herald and president of
the University Press club, will ad-
dress students upon "Breaking Into
the News Game," in the third of the
Union Sunday meetings series of the
year, at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon
in the Union reading room.
Informal discussion of problems and
opportunities in the newspaper field,
and the necessary qualifications of
college men for work in that field,
will be on the program. Mr. Ottaway
will be introduced by Joseph A. Bern-
ste'n, '22, acting as chairman of the
meeting.
General attendance at the Sunday
afternoon meetings rather than at-
tendance by only those interested es-
pecially in entering the field to be
discussed, is the aim of the commit-
tee in securing speakers for the regu-
lar weekly talks. This is the second
year that they have been arranged
by the Union, their revival this fall
being due to requests by numbers of
students and to the success of the
taks last spring. While the series as
a whole is calculated to give men in
the University some 'idea of the rela-
tive values of all the professions, the
committee, of which Norman C. Da-
mon, '23, is chairman, aims at the same
time to present the point of view of
successful men in various fields as
it is altered and broadened by experi
ences in after life.
WORK ON NEW DENTAL
ADDITIONUDEWAY
Plans for the new addition to the
Dental building are beginning to as-
sume their final form and with ex-
cavation already underway it is ex-
pected that the construction proper
will be begun within the next few
weeks.
The addition will be joined direct-
ly to the rear of the present Dental
building on North University avenue.
The new structure will carry out the
general architectural plan of the
present building.
When completed the basement of
the enlarged Dental building will con-
tain the locker rooms, supply stores,
an exhibit room, and metallurgy lab-
oratories. The first or main floor will
contain the junior laboratory, the
sophomore and hygienics laborator-
ies, an amphitheater with a seating
capacity of 184, and a lecture room
with a seating capacity of 293, besides
several small private laboratories.
The entiresecond floo will be de-
voted to operating rooms and dispens-
ing rooms.
In order to gain a firm bedding for
the construction of the foundation it
has been necessary to go as deep as
20 feet in some instances anddthis is
the nature of the work already under-
way.

(Special to The Daily)
Madison, Wis., Jan. 14.-Michiga-
loses in an overtime game to the Bad-
gers, 18 to 16. Ceasar threw a field
goal for the only score of the extra
period. Wisconsin doubled Michigan's
score in the first half, their short pass-
es being of a type entirely different
from anything Michigan has faced this
year.
This half was marked by many
fouls both personaI and technical,
Ceasar being the only Jmembeif of
either team to escape being penalized.
Michigan came back fighting hard the
second half, ho'ding Wisconsin score-
less from the field, while they gather-
ed in three field goals. During the five
minutes extra period both teams play-
ed a close defensive game. It was a
1ong shot by Ceaser which gave the
Badgers the extra two points.
The lineup:
Wisconsin Position Michigan
Taylor ..........R.F......... Miller
C(eser...........L.F......... Kipke
Gibson..........C.............Ely
Wil'lams........R.G............Rea
Tebell...........L.G.......Cappon
Score end of first half: Wisconsin
12, Mchigan 6. FIeld goals: Mich-
igan. Ely 2, Miller 1, Rea 1. Wscon-
oin, Taylor 4, Williams 1, Ceasar 1
Free throws: Ely 6 in 9, Miller 2 in
R. Taylor 6 in 12. Fouls: Michigan,
Kipke. 3, Rea 3, Cappon 3, Ely 2, Mil-
1er 1. Wisconsin, Williams 5, Tebell
4, Taylor 3, Gibson 2, Caeser 1. Sub-
stitutions: Paper for Kipke, Gage for
Gibson.
CAMPUS OPINIONS FAVOR
DISCUSSION GRO0UP PLAN
From every quarter of the campus
have come definite indications of ap-
proval in regard to the Union's idea
to initiate small discussion groups
next semester in an attempt to bring
student and faculty man in closer
contact with each other.
Some little speculation was voiced
at first as to whether this plan would
encroach in any way on the discus-
sions being conducted by the Student
Christian association throughout the
different fraternity houses. ' It soon
became obvious, however, that there
would be no connection between the
two and all fear of a possible con-
flict was dispelled.
"The plan is excellent," said Prof.
Robert M. Wenley, of the philosophy
department. "I will certainly lend my
aid to any project tha-has as a basis
the idea of bringing the student in
closer' relation to the faculty."
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
school, did not have much to say on
(Continued on Page Ten)
Dinner Dance Is.
Planned Ily Union,
A dinner dance with music provided
by a special orchestra and given dur-
ing the regular dinner hour in the
Union main dining room is planned
by the management for next Friday
night. Such a dinner has never before
been attempted and comes as a result
of numerous requests from students.
The special music of the evening
will continue from 6 to 8 o'clock. The
center of the dining room will be
cleared of tables, leaving room for the
dancing. The regular dinner service
will not be interrupted in any way,
as a full staff will be provided to care
for the patrons of the dining room.
BASKETBALL SCORES
Minnesota 24, Iowa 16.
Illinois 48, Ohio State 36.

composed of students who are going ism and his experiences in the metro-
into foreign missionary work. This is politan field of newspaper work.
the largest student volunteer club in Tickets for the luncheon will be on
the country. sale at Wahr's and the Union desk.

... .

Hill Auditorium
Monday Eve.
January 23

OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH-Conductor and Pianist
IN A BRILLIANT ALL-RUSSIAN PROGRAM, WITH
T he Detroit Symphony Orchestra

Tickets:

I

50c, $1.00,
$1.50 and
$2.00

R. ,

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