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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-14

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THE MI

-iIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UIIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Iiver-
: year by the Brosr I in Contrsl of Student PublicatIOns.
MEMBER OF THE ASSGCIATE)D PRESS
The Associated Press ai, exusively entited to the o for
ptulicatisp. of all news disptch"i credited to it or not otrwia.
died i tispaper ad thtoa news*pblishe terei.
Entered at the posoice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as seco
ss matter.
Suscriptiongby carrier or mail,r$3.5s0.
tofics:Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Stret.
Phones: iBusiness, 960; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig
ature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidenceof
th,, and notices of events will be published hin The Daily at the
iretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
isigned cornnications will receive no consideration. o man-
pri t will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments e-
essed in the communications,.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
ANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
sistant Managing Editor.................Hugh W. Hitchcock
ty Editor ........... .............* . P. Lovejoy, Jr.
ght Editors-_
R K. Aqims G. P. Overton
John P. Dawson M. . Stal
itr1ard i.a sioecht Paul'Watzel
itorial Board Chairman....................L. Armstrong Kern
asistats-
f co Hershdorfer E. R. Meis
nday Magazine Editor...............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
change Editor............................George E. Sloan
asc Editor...............................Sidney B. Coate
oring Edirr. ....................... George Reindel
oriien's Editor .........................Elizabeth Vickery
timor ditor................................ZE R. Meiss
Assistants
1Kingdley S. Anderson L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
Maurice Berman Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
Cecil R. Betron H. B. Grundy . E. Mack
Jack D. Briscoe Sadyebeth Heath kathrie Montgomery
:V .- Butler Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
. N. Byers Harry D. Hioey F. Pontius
A. D. 'Clark Agnes Holmquist Lillian Scher
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. B. Tarr
.P. Comstock Marion :Kerr Virginia Tryon
Robert W. Cooper L. S. Kerr Dorothy Whiple
Evelyn J. Couglin M. A. Klaver L. L. Yost
Joh n P. Dawson Victor W. Klein j. B. Young
A. Donahue Marion Koch
W. F. Elliott George E. Lardner
BUSINE8S STAFF
Telephone 960
0SINESS MANAGER.............VERNON F. HILLERY
vertising.................... ..F. M. Heath, A.'J. Parker
blication .......................--....... Nathan W. Robertson
c6unts..............................John J. Hamels, Jr.
roulation.... .....................-...-Hereld C. Hunt
Assistants
u-r L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
BeaumontParks Maurice Moule J A. Dryer
'alter Scherer Goldring : Rihard Heideman
4w. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blun
SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1922
Night Editor-G. P. OVERTrON
Assistant-J. E. Mack
Proofreadeis-J. F. Pontius
M. E. Gordon
THINGS 'SHAT COUNT
Tangible results are pleasant to behold. Men find
peculiar satisfaction in seeing, and in having other
:ensee, the actual products of their own labor,
xether it be physical or mental. The reaction pro-
ads "iuntil men are, judged only by what they ac-
:iplish in di definite, concrete way. In the end no
rson:or institution not palpably useful and practi-
. is, considered worthy of existing, or at least
brthy of praise.
"The trouble ivith the doctrine is that the intangi-
e results are quite as important as the tangible.
ossiby they are not so perceptibly necessary as
e- concrete, but the fact remains that certain work
hioh seems never to accomplish anything solid and
lbstantial is really essential. If it is not accom-
ished a noticeable gap is left. Moreover, certain
)ncrete things are done which attract no great
easure of attention' in the large, but which to a
na.:extent are necessary. A football team cannot
t along without its, linesmen, but in the majority
Rases'th l{ back s get the greater part of the credit
ir the. team's victories.
This is the case of the Student Christian associa-
>n.~Much of its work may seem unimportant, even
iiak. Much of it' may appear fruitless. But the
Lt remains that it answers needs which must be
led, and even though the results are iot startlingly
Iparent -or though they are relatively unimportant,

ey are results which must be produced.
Thefact is that the S. C. A. performs a function
at can be . ierformed by no other organization. It
iiaies the rcligio'usactivities of the various denom-
ations with adherents among the student body;
:maintains an extension service; it sponsors the
nionr Services committee and the World Service
irnt; conducts a University of Michigan Fresh
i cam)p for poor children every summer; co-
erates with the Cosmopolitan club in its work with
e foreign students of the University; works in
)junction with the Ann Arbor Bible chair; con-
.cts the Bible Study institute; organizes religious
scussion .groups; and carries on many other ac-
vities besides.
All of this work must be done. Its importance can
fully realized only when it is left undone. When
man's heart beats along steadily, he never thinks
out it ; but let his pulse begin to skip and flutter
id he is all concern. The function of the S. C. A.
t a spectacular function, for the most part, is an
sential one, for all that.-
But the S. C. A. is a student organization. It is
n by students and must be financed largely by stu-
nts. Inasmuch as the work is worthy, even nec-
sary, it would he a sad thing if the association's
ive for. funds should fail.
ANN ANBOR'ON THE STAGE
"Make It for Two", which is to be repeated at
e dedication of the Union ..theater early next
ji h, las_.go ne'down .in the-history of Michigan's'
Imatc produt:- ions as ?a: success. Mimes, the
st, the chorus; the orchestra, the writer of the.

opera, the composer of the music, and the director-
all are to be congratulated for their success in mak-
ing the show one worthy of taking its place with, or
even ahead of, its predecessors. Its reception here
was marked by well-filled houses, while on the road
the alumni viewed the show with great enthusiasm.
But "Make It for Two", while it may not be for-
gotten for a long time to come, is now in the past,
and the time is drawing near for the selection of
next year's book. In the last two of Mimes' pre-
sentations, the scenes have been laid in places for-
eign to Ann Arbor, one having dealt with Ireland
and the other with the mythical land of "Nowhere".
The time is now ripe for another type of opera, one
with local setting and with more of the college at-
mosphere. A college show after all is a student
show, produced by students for students and alumni,
and, while it is true that any production of merit
will be accepted, one with local setting and plot
might be more pleasing to the "old-timers" than a
dreamy tale of no place in particular.
Such a play, obviously, should not become too
colloquial, nor do we ask that it contain pillow
fights and pennant-waving scenes; but it should re-
tain some of the college atmosphere for which
Union operas were primarily'intended. To alumni,
an opera with a plot centering around Ann Arbor
and student life is always eagerly looked forward
to, for it is to them a reminder of their own under-
graduate days.
The call probably will be issued soon for writers
to present their ideas or books for the 1923 Mimes
production, and it would-be well if they would keep
in mind the fact that a "college" opera, if for no
other reason than for the sake of variety, would be
highly appreciated by the student body and the
alumni.
THE PUBLIC SPEAKS
Now that Senator Newberry is finally seated in
the senate, it seems that the issue is closed and that
alldiscussion should be dropped. The senator from
Michigan though convicted of violation of'the cor-
rupt practices act, sentenced to serve two years in
a federal prison, and later freed from the charge
by a five to four vote of the Supreme court, which
declared the law unconstitutional, finally, after a
senatorial investigation, has been exonerated and
seated as the rightful representative of the state of
Michigan. He is at last at liberty to enter upon
his duties without question and with the feeling
that the 46 to 41 vote is a "complete vindication"
The very fact that so much controversy has
arisen is a healthful sign. It means that the public
is beginning to be interested in the manner by which
a man is elected to office. It means, perhaps, that
the methods of employing large sums for swinging
elections or nominations meet with little favor in
the public eye. Senator Newberry's friends broke
no valid law in securing his nomination by the ex-
penditure of a large campaign fund, but the peo-
ple,'through their spokesmen, have shown that they
feel the use of great sums for winning political cam-
paigns is dangerous and impolitic. They will not
willingly tolerate the practice in the future.
For the present, however, it would be well to let
things go at that. The lesson having been read, it
is to be hoped that political aspirants have listened
attentively and have learned it well.
The unsettled disputation over the Eastern Big
Three championship of last fall has been reneated
thus far with us: Chicago beat Ohio, O. S. U. won
from us, and Michigan beat Chicago, Q. E. D.
Track-burners are needed by Coach Farrell, if
he is to singe the hair of Michigan opponents this
year.
lhe Telescope
Read 'Em and Weep
I throw the dice with eager hands;
A seven shows, the cash I take.
A doubled fade; that seven stands
Athwart my luck. The fateful shake.
My fortune god stirs in his sleep,
And softly 'cups, "Read 'em and weep."

With restless hands I grasp my pen,
Prepare in words my thoughts to cast.
Blue-book returns from prof's dark den;
What hopes blue pencil marks can blast!
Recumbent on a blue-book heap,
My luck god begs to read and weep.
Impassioned words that have nopeer
In annals of our statesmen's speech *
Affect her not. She does not hear;
Her blue eyes coldly past me reach.
Upon my shoulder hastes to leap
My god who mourns, "Read 'em and weep."
-Zeke.
Righto!
Dear Erm: When your friend laughs at you for
not being cultured enough to attend the Oratorical
association lectures - like him - and then in the
same breath says, "Gce, I better beat it darn quick
down to Hill or I'll be too late for the Gab Fest -
ain't it the berries? -Kanukk.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Here lies the last
Of William Thinn,
His book at the Lib.
Was found to be in.
-Benedicte.
Famous Closing Lines
I'm all mixed up," muttered the bread (lonigh
thickly. ERM.

!, REDUCT'IONS ON
r Emb-ossed Stationery
A m AT ,.-,
rr GRAHAMS
r Both Ends of Diagonal Walk

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oo
a. m., 7:oo a. m., 8:oo a. m., 9:oo a. m. and
hourly to 9:o5 p. in.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
:47 p. mn.
. Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:oo a.
m. and every two hours to 9:00 p. m., u1.00
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-il :4o p. m., 12:25
3. in., r:15 a. im.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5* a. M., 2:44
1). M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
x:47, 10:47, a. mn., 12:47, 2.47, 4=47.
To Jackson and Lansing - Limited: ':47
1922 JANUARY 1922
S M T W T F S
1 2 8 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 1 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 28 24 25 26 27 28
29 80 81
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all 'kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
nside out, with all new trimmings.1
ire as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
A Reliable Jeweler
C CHAPMAN
113 South Mair

! I

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PREPAIRED"

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BY YOUR APPEARANCE

SEND YOUR

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TO

"The DOE-WAH-JACK"
CLEANERS AND PRESSERS

CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED
426 THOMPSON ST. SUITS BROS.

t

EST. 1904
Z W E R D L I N G

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They are displayed at sur-
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Zwerdling Bldg.'

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FURS MADE UP AND REMODELED

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They surely feel good these
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AT LIBERTY

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