100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
SLOWLY RISING TEMPER-
ATURE TODAY

Yl r e

Mfr A

~Iaitr

ASSOCIATEE
PRESS"
DAY AND NIGHT W1
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 80 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1922 PRICE FIVE C

SHANTUNG IS NEXT
f ROBLEMFAC INRG
JAPAN AND CHINA CONTINUE
,SESSIONS ON EASTERN
QUESTIONS
NAVY PACT CONSIDERED
VIRTUALLY COMPLETED
Final Draft Soon to Be Laid Before
Committee and Publicly_
Announced
(B Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 13. - With the
naval treaty virtually completed the
arms delegates are preparing to turn
the conference promptly on Shan-
tung, apparently in the hope that a
settlement of that controversy may
make it easier to go ahead with other
troublesome problems of the Far
East.
It is now the expectation in confer-
ence circles that during the next few
days and probably until a decision is
reached, the Shantung negotiations
will have right of way while discus-
sion of other Far Eastern subjects
remain at a standstill.
American Observers Present
So far the Shantung exchanges have
taken place between the Japanese and
Chinese alone, with American and
British observers present. but the
next phase of the conference program
is expected at least to concentrate on
the problem of the friendly interests
of all the governments represented
here.,
At their 'meeting today the Chinese
and Japanese groups reached an
agreement for opening up the entire
Kiaochow leased territory to foreign
trade and tomorrow they are to take
up the collateral question involved in
restoration of the lease hold to China.
Their sessions are expected to last
throughout the day and will form the
only item appearing on tomorrow's
conference program.
Few Details Remainn
In the naval negotiations only a
few details considered more or less
perfunctory, remain to be arranged.
If present plans develop ,the final
draft of the naval treaty will be laid
before the full naval committee early
next week and will be publicly an-
nounced at a plenary session of the
conference a few days later.
Pleasing Variety
Sown In Concert
In a program of works from a va-
riety of composers, and representing
a variety of national types of music,
Mrs. Emma Fischer-Cross, former
member of the Scifool of Music piano
faculty, displayed a distinct technical
accuracy and pleasing variation of
tonal effect which made her concert
in the Bethlehem church last night a
well worth-while event.
Mrs. Fischer-Cross, who has done
concert work for a number of years
in different parts of the country, is
a mature player and did not miss any
opportunity to display her under-
standing of the effects represented in
her music. Chopin's Polonaise, Opus
63, the national Polish march, stood
out on the program as a well han-
dled selection requiring difficult work
ing up of gradual climaxes, and sus-
tained rhythm.
Mrs. Annis Dexter Gray, contralto,
who assisted Mrs. Fischer-Cross in her
program, sang several numbers, of
which her "Zur Ruh', zur Ruh'!" was
probably the best, in a voice of rich-
ness in the upper register.

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB PLANS
WORLD RELATIONS TALKS
The Cosmopolitan club laid plans
at its meeting last night for a ser-
ies of discussions on questions of in-
ternational relationships, open to all
students and faculty members.
Such topics as "A Model League of
Nations, its Form, Organization, Pow-
ers, and Plans for its Execution," and
"The Better Understanding of Other
Peoples Through the Establishment of
International Trade and an Interna-
tional Language," will be on the pro-
gram. Meetings will be held every
second Friday evening in the office of
- Prof. J. A. C. Hildner, faculty adviser
for the club. Later If atkendance war-
rants the meetings wi'l be held in
Natural Science auditorium.
Fire Danjages Home!
Fire caused a small damage to the
roof of the home of Mrs. M. M. Davis,'
602 East Catherine street, shortly aft-
er 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. The
bIaze was extinguished in a few min-
utes.

BURTON PRAISES
YOST'S INFLUENCE
Flint, Jan. 13.-Coach Fielding H.
Yost is one of the "strongest influ-
ences on the Michigan campus," stated
President Marion L. Burton of the
University of Michigan in a comment
upon the position of the University in
athletics durinng hisaddress at the an-
nual alumni banquet here Wednes-
day.
This remark was the signal for the
greatest demonstration of the eve-
ning and Flint alumni declared their
support of Yost in no uncertain
terms. In the selection of Yost as the
head of the newly formed department
of athletics, said the President, it was
thought that his presence on the cam-
pus 12 months a year instead of 3
would greatly increase his value to
the University.
Flint alumni will hold a mass meet-
ing next Tuesday night forthe pur-
pose of adopting a wide rscope of ac-
tivity as the result of a suggestion by
President Burton.
NATI1N FROM EVERY
SMAN IS GOAL of Se. C A,

All Appli
N
THREE 0
TO FU
More tha
ets to the;

BSK FOR HOP
DKETS TO DATE:
eations Will Be Answered
ot Later Than Next
Wednesday
)RCHESTRAS SECURED
JRNISH MUSIC AT EVENT
an 850 applications for tick-
J-Hop had been received byl

BUILDING PROGRAM TAKES TANGIBLE
PROPORTIONS AS WORK 1S RUSHED

FUNDS ARE ACCOUNTED FOR
ADVANCE BY DETAILED
BUDGET

IN

With a contribution from every man
on the campus as the objective, the
Student Christian association drive
will open next Tuesday morning to
raise at least $4,000 for the support
of the institution.
"No matter how large or small the
sum may be, we want something from
every student," said C. Maurice Atkin-
son, '22, general chairman, yesterday.
"If everyone gives something the re-
quired quota is sure to be obtained."
The budget has been reduced $1,000
from the amount used last year.
Every cent in the budget is accounted
for and several of the items are be-
ing published in The Daily each day
so that the campus will know just how
the money is being used.
- The sum of $450 is needed for re-
ligious education. The Institute of
Religious Education, The . Religious
Education assembly, and the starting
and conducting of discussion groups
in fraternities have been under the
supervision of this department. It has
also promoted the courses dealing in
religious education now given on the
campus. The money is used for speak-
ers, printing, and office expense.
Twenty-five dollars are needed for
publicity, including advertisements in
newspapers, posters, circulars and
letters. One hundred and fifty dol-
lars are needed for social purposes.
The money is spent for parties which
are given during vacation periods for
students who are unable to go home.
For a contingent fund $300 is re-
quired. This is kept as a reserve for
any emergencies that may come up
during the year and for any other de-
partments that may run over the
amount allotted In the budget.
To conduct foreign student work,
$75 is needed. This money is spent in
helping foreign students on the cam-
uus become acquainted with conditions
here, aiding them in getting settled.
and entertaining them. There are 350
foreigners on the campus.
PROF. NELSON LOOKS OVER
SETTINGS FOR "PYGMALION"
Final inspection of stage settings
and lighting effects for "Pygmalion"
were made in Detroit yesterday by
Prof. J.aRaleigh Nelson, director of
the play. The scenery which is being
constructed by O. S. Davis of Detroit,
will be brought to Ann Arbor on Tues-
day of next week. - "Both the set-
tings and the lighting effects show
brilliant workmanship and are entire-
ly satisfactory," Professor Nelson
stated yesterday on his return.
More than 250 tickets have been sold
so far for "Pygmalion". Desirable
balcony seats and a few on the main
floor may still be obtained however.
lox seats and loges are on sale for
$1.50. The sale will continue at
Graham's bookstore until Tuesday of
next week when the tickets will be
taken to the Whitney theater.
Edueitional Seniors Meet
Seniors in the School of Education
met yesterday afternoon in Tappan
hall. Class rolls were distributed to
the members and the amount of the
class dues was fixed. Plans for the
social events of next semester were
discussed.
Hatch Leaving for Syracuse
Melville H. Hatch, of the zoology
department, will leave next Tuesday
for Syracuse university, where he will
be an instructor in zoology.
Former Nebraska Senator Dies
Omaha, Neb. Jan. 13.-Former Unit-
ed States Senator Joseph H Millard,
of Nebraska, died here late today.

the ticket committee, R. D. Gibson,
chairman, up to 6 o'clock yesterday
evening. The committee expects to
have the applications listed, filed and
the answers sent back not later than
Wednesday of next week. To those
who will receive tickets the answers
will .impart a definite time when they
are to call at the Union to purchase
them and to those who will not re-
ceive tickets, the answers will state
the reasons why their applications
were not accepted.
Three orchestras will furnish mu-
sic at the Hop, two of which are
from out of town, it was announced
by L. W. Kirkpatrick, '23E, chairman
of the music committee, yesterday.
Kennedy's 10-piece Society orchestra
of Ann Arbor, Rubenstein's 8-piece or-
chestra of Detroit, and Warring's 8-
piece orchestra of Pittsburgh will play
for the dancers. Rubenstein's orches-
tra is known as the entertainer at the
Wolverine hotel, Detroit. Warring's
orchestra of Pittsburgh has played in
the William Penn hotel, Pittsburgh,
and the Hotels McAlpin and Schem-
ley, New York. It has also played
several engagements at house par-
ties at Columbia and Cornell univer-
sities.
As at former Hops, both Barbour'
and Waterman gymnasiums will be
thrown open to. the dancers. Two or-
chestras will furnish continuous musc
in Waterman gymnasium. The third1
orchestra wil play intermittently in
Barbour gymnasium.
BONUS, ALLIED0REFUN
BILLS TO BE SEPARAE
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 13.-The soldier
bonus bill will not be made a part of
the allied debt refunding bill, Chair-
man McCumber of the senate finance
committee said tonight after a series
of conferences had been held between
senate leaders to discuss the desirabil-
ity of merging the two and it had be-
come known at the White House that
President Harding did not look with
favor upon the suggestion that they be
combined.
The foreign debt bill, Senator Mc-
Cumber said, would be taken up. by
'he finance committee Monday in the
hope that it would be put In shape
at that time for reporting to the sen-
ate. It was the intention, he said. ttq
eiminate some of the features to which
he treasury department has objected
end which has resulted in the measure
being held in committee for several
weeks. These Include provisions for
semi-annual payements of interest and
that the interest rates shall not be
less than five per cent,
DR. PA RNET.T DENE IM1 OR
OF ADDITION TO HOSPITAL
Has Not Heard of Any Such Plans
from Authoriative Source,
He Says'
Current rumors concerning the ps-
sibllity of the addition of two stories
to the new University hospital f-r the
nurpose of caring for cripuled chil-
dren of the state were denied by Dr.
Christopher G. Parnall, director of the
hosnital, in an interview yesterday.
"I have heard of no such plans,"
said Dr. Parnall, "and do not know
who would have the authority to make
such a statement. The outsde of the
new hosptal is practically completed
a.nd the addition, of any moe stories
would necessitate the tearing off o
the roof. I do not believe that such
an expensve proect is being seri
ously contemplated - partcu'arly ini
view of the fact that the care of many
crippled children of the state is al-
ready provided for by a state law
passed in 1913, and by an action tak-
en by the Rotary club at a Ninth Dis-
trict meeting a year or so ago."
OVERCOAT TTTP T GIVEN
JAIL SENTENCE OF 30 DAYS

Robert Huzhes and Merrit Gifford.
who were arrested Thursd-y afternoon
for stealing overcoats at the Ann Ar-
bor high school. were heard bfore
Jtdee John D. Thomas' court yester-I
day afternoon. Gifford was sentenced
to 30 days in the county fail. and
Nu les. who is thought to have colen
a $90 overnoat at Jackson. Michigan.
was turned over to the sheriff from
that city. Both men pleaded guilty.

Each day finds Michigan's new
building program assuming more tan-
gible proportions, with excavations
being made at different points about
the campus, buildings being wrecked,
and foundations being laid.
The new-Clements library is now1
well under way. Twenty feet of the
old Engineering building have been
torn down and the excavations are1
finished. All is in readiness for ther
building to take on definite lines with-1
in a short time. A concrete footing has -
been laid, and at present forms for
the basement walls, are being built.1
Under the supervision of the Ann'
Union Announces
2Ilook Exchange
Service Trial
Institution of a book exchange .serv-
ce is announced by the Union as the
end of the semester, when many stu-
dents will be through with their
books, approaches. Two card indext
files will be kept, one of books that
are wanted, the other of books that
are offered for sale. The volumes will
be catalogued under the names of
authors.Theredwill be nokcharge for
the service, and no ooks will be
brought to the Union.
.The committee, with James Stevens,
'23, in charge, will act as a clearing
house of information for those hav-'
ing exchanges to be made. Individ-
uals will have to get in touch with
each other and make the deals be-
tween themselves. Notification must
be given the Union when sales are1
made so that the files can be correct-;
ed immediately.
The service will commence Mon-t
day, when all those who will havej
hooks to sell or who will have books
to buy next semester, should get1
their wants catalogued. Office hours1
will be maintained by the committee
from 4 to 5:30 o'clock on Mondays and
Thursdays of each week until next
semester, at desk three in the stu-
dent activities room on the third floor
of the Union.-1
Each -card will contain the name of
the author, title, edition, date of pub-t
lication, condition, price, name ofr
student, address and phone number.-
The service is an experiment which is.
being given a trial at the request of
many students. If it is successful, its
scope will be enlarged.
SOUTHERN MIRLNDMAY
RATIFYTREATY TODAY
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Jan. 13.-Interest in the po-
litical situation tonight centered n the
meeting which will be held tomorrow'
by the southern parliament for the
ratification of the peae treaty with
Great Britian. Invitations to the ses-
sion were issued today, singed by
Arthur Griffiths. They were directed
to all deputies elected for the 26
southern counties including Eamonn
de Valera and his adherents. It is
not expected, however, that Mr. de
Valera or his followers will attend.,
The meeting will be held in the Oak
room of Mansion house and, unlessf
some members opposed to the treaty
decide at the last minute to attend,,
it promises to be a somewhat per-i
functory ceremony.
QUARTERS.OFFERED 200 MEN r
IF L C. A. A. A. A. MEETS HERE'
Fraternities Assure Accommodations;
For Double the Number Or.
iginally Asked
Members of the interfraternity con-
ference pledged themselves last night
to core for as many as 200 men if ne-
cessary during the annual track and

field meet of the Intercollegiate Asso-
ciation of Amateur Athletes of Amer-
ica, in case this meet is held in Ann
Arbor next May. The conference meet-
ing was called to determine the pos-
sibility of obtaining quarters for 100
men.
DUFF OF LANSING TO PREACH
AT CONGREATIONAL CHURCH
Major Ralph Duff, of Lansing, will
occupy the pulpit of .the Congrega-
tional church at 10:30 o'clock tomor-
row morning. During the last six
years he has been secretary to the
governor of Michigan, having been
l called to Lansing at the beginning of
Governor Sleeper's regime.
At the present time he is also serv-
ing as superintendent of the Industrial
School for- Boys at Lansing and is
sponsoring some changes in adminis-
tration.

Arbor Asphalt Construction company,
some 30 houses across the street from
the campus on East University avenue,
are in process of being wrecked or re-
moved. This property, when cleared,
will be the site of a new Medical
building and Engineering shops.
Plans for the new dental addition
are in their final form with only a
few minor details yet to be worked
over and approved by the authorities
prior to the letting of the contracts.
in style of architecture the addition
will follow closely that of the present
building which is constructed of brick
with stone window sills.
Excavation work is being pushed
rapidly and it will be but a short time
before all will be in readiness for lay-
Ing the foundation. The new struc-
ture is to be located directly behind
the present Dental building on North
University avenue.
Borings have been made for the new
Physics building in order to determine
the quality of the ground and the fea-
sibility of construction work in that
particular place. Reports were entire-
ly satisfactory and work will begin at
,n early date. The R. 0. T. C. build-
ing will have to be torn down to make
room for the Physics building.
JEREMIA H JENKS, 78
TALS HERE TOMORROW

WILL BE
SITY

SPEAKER AT UNIVER-
SERVICES IN HILL
AUDITORIUM

Prof. Jeremiah W. Jenks, '78, will be
the speaker at the University service
at 7 o'clock tomorrow night in Hill
auditorium. His topic is "Teachings
of Jesus as a Factor in Internotional
Politics."
Since leaving the University he has
been a- member of the faculties of Mt.
Morris college, Knox college, and In-
diana, and Cornell universities, teach-
ing economics, political economy,
and public administration. Professor
Jenks is now the head of the new de-
partment of Oriental commerce and
politics at New York university.
He has been called into the service
of the federal government a number
of times as an expert on political
economy and administration, and has
a.dvised the Industrial commission,
Immigration commisson, the Depart-
ment of Labor, and War department.
At one time he was employed by the
government of Mexico as an expert on
currency reform. He has also been
sent on several commissions to for-
eign countries.'
Professor Jenks is the author of
works on econoiic and political sub-
jects, on religious and allied topics,
and on the problems of youth.
A, banquet will be given Professor
Jenks tonight by the Commerce club
at the Union. Following the banquet
'ie will deliver a short talk.
TALAMON TO C ODCT
SUMMER FRENCH TUR
Prof. Rene Talamon, of the romance
languages department, who will return
shortly from Washington where he has
acted as interpreter at the Disarma-
ment conference, will head a party of
American teachers and students to
France this summer. There will be a
number of such university groups
throughout the country, each under
the direction of some professor of
romance languages.
The trip, whose purpose is to enable
American teachers and students to
study in France at the lowest possible
cost, will be of 10 weeks' duration, ex-
tending from July 1, when. the party
sails from New York, until Sept. 1.
Those students and teachers who are
interested in taking the trip may make
provisional sarrangements with Prof.
C..P. Wagner, head of the Spanish de-
partment, before Professor Talamon's
return.
Professor Wagner will also have
charge of a group who will visit Spain
and points in Southern France and
along the Riviera, sailing from Mon-
treal June 16, and returning Sept. 4.
This trip, like that to France, is es-
sentially an educational one. It is
planned primarily for those teachers
and students of Spanish who wish to
avail themselves of the course of study
offered next summer at Madrid, under
'-he direction of the Spanish govern-
ment.
Tap Room Entertainment
Regular Saturday night entertain-
ment will be provided in the tan room
tonight beginning at 10:15 o'clock.
Songs and comedy numbers will be
offered by Willard W. Cass, '25, and
Carl M. Boswell, '24E, both of whom
have had wide experience in similar
entertainments heretofore.

UNION CONSIDERS,
FAC UL[TY- STUDENT D
DSCIJSSION PLAN
EXPRESSIONS OF OPINION WILL
DETERMINE ACTION ON
PROPOSITION
TALKS MAY BE BEGUN
DURING NEXT SEMESTER
Professors Declare Favorably on Un-
derlying Principle of
Gatherings
y
Discussion groups ,at which mem-
bers of the faculty would speak in-
formally to small groups of students
'n a wide variety of subjects which
do not come up in the class room, and
which would secure personal contact
between faculty membergraduate and
undergraduate, are' being considered
by the Union, and it was announced
yesterday that if sentiment in most
quarters favors it, the project will be
commenced with the opening of the
second semester.
The success which has attended the
discussions on religion ,philosophy
and ethics by faculty men in frater-
nity houses under the direction of the
Student Christian association, has
made the Union consider the advisa-
bility of holding meetings in the Union
to which all students would come in
small groups, and where the faculty
members would speak on politics, his-
tory, philosophy, literature, travel and
many other subjects.
Not to Conflict with S. C. A.
There would be no conflict between
the -Union's work and the Stu-
dent Christian association discussion
groups. The former would simply be
broader in scope, both from a stand-
point of men reached and in subjects,
It is felt that with men. of distinc-
tion in many fields who teach only a
limited part of a subject in a class
room, students do not get the full ben-
efit of the advantages which these men
have to offer. It is also believed that
the personal contact will do much to
promote mutual understandings.
Members of the faculty, interviewed
yesterday as to their attitude toward
the proposed discussion groups, ex-
pressed themselves as favoring the
underlying principles.
Prof. Jesse S. Beeves, of the politi-
cal science department, said that
while heartily in favor of the idea, he
thought it would tend to add, to the
already crowded schedule of the pro-
fessor.
Must Have Student Support
Prof. William A. Frayer, of the his-
tory department, expressed the opin-
ion that the scheme would work it
the students were behind the idea.,
Prof. Morris P. Tilley, of the Eng-
'ish department, said he favored any
plan that would bring the faculty and
students together in an informal way.
He suggested, though, that the groups
should be so organized as to permit
the student, to take an/ active part.
Professor Tilley thinks the plan
should be tried out on a small scale
first and that the discussions be con-
fined to some topic of vital interest.
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman ,of the eco-
nomics department, while hesitating
to express the attitude of his col-
leagues in this department, said he
thought they would be generally will-
ing to give their support in any way
which would aid in making these dis-
cussion groups workable.
Approves Closer Relationship
"I am thoroughly in accord with
any means through which faculty
members and students may be
brought into closer relationship,"
said Dean E. H. Kraus, of the Sum-
mer session. "I have not given
thought to the details of a plan such
as that being considered by the
Union, but I believe the principle un-

derlying it is worthy of serious con-
sideration.
"Such contact as contemplated is
already made in advance laboratory
courses where the student and in-
structor arerconstantly thrown to-
gether. In these groups subjects oth-
er than those related to the course
itself are under discussion every day.
"I,have no doubt as to the willing-
ness of faculty members to give their
tripe for informal discussion meetings
if a real interest is shown on the. part
of the students."
BISHOP WILLIAMS TO SPEAK
AT ST. ANDREWS TOMORROW
Rt. Rev. Charles D. Williams, bishop
of the diocese of Michigan, will be the
speaker at the 10:30 o'clock service
tomorrow morning at St. Andrew's
Episcopal church. The bishop has not
snoken in Ann Arbor since his trip to
England where he made a careful
study of British labor conditions, and
he will probably make some refer-
ence to his work abroad in his sermon.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan