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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 13, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 ME, . VllIrlI N V £~Jii /ilL. I

OFFICIAL NEWSPAP R OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF AICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the farve
sity year by the Bard in Cntol of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is excusivel entitled to the use for
reoublication of all news dspatchs credited to it or not Otherwise
redited in this pater and the local ners published therein.
Entered at the postofice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as secoad
Class matter.
Subrscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street,
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300, words, if signed, the sig-
nature not -necessarily to appear in print, butIas an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscrpt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily, does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ext-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR...........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................,Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor ................................. E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R .E. Adams G. P. Overton
John P. Rawson M. B. Stak
toaward* ,umncht Paul watzel
Editorial Board Chairman...............L. Armstrong Kern
4sistnts-
l eo Hershdorfer E. R. Meiss
Spnday Magazine Editor.............Thornton W. Sargent Jr.
Exchange Editor...............................George E. Sloan
Music Editor..................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor ............................... George Reindel
Women's Editor....... .................. Elizabeth Vickery
[Humor Editor,... .............................ZE R. Meiss
Assistants
King'ley S. Andersion L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
Maurice Berman Dorcthy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
Cecil R. Betrou H. B. Grundy j. E. Mack
JackD. Briscoe Sadyebeth Heath Kathrine Montgomery
.B. Butler Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
R. N. Byers Harry D. Hoe J. F. Pontius
A. D. Clark Agnes >Holmquist Lillian Scher
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. B. Tarr
P. Comstock Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
Robert W. Cooper L. S. Kerr' Dorothy Whipple
Evelyn J. Couglin M. A. Klaver L. L. Yost
John P. Dawson Victor W. Klein J. B. Young
H. A. Donahe Marion Koch
W. F. Elliott George E. Lardner
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER .............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising......................F, M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publicationi............................. Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts....................John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation .................................. Hereld C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
U .Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J.A. Dryer
'Walter Scherer ,,ii Goldring Richard Heideman
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1922
Night Editor-JOHN DAWSON, JR.
Assistant-H. E. Howlett
Proofreaders-M. H. Pryor
L. M. Lobe
PAGING MR. AUTHOR
With the announcement today that the scenario
contest now being conducted by The Daily would
be extended three weeks because no plot of sufficient
merit had been turned in at the original closing
time, a situation is presented which is at once pecu-
liar and unfortunate, in that, out of all the plots
submitted, not one was found to be of "sufficient
originality, dramatic interest, or literary value" to
convince the committee of judges that any one of
the scenarios was deserving of final selection.
Surely, in a student body of almost nine thousand,
we should be able to find writers of ability who, if
they set themselves to the task, could undoubtedly
produce stories which would combine dramatic
quality with freshness of plot and literary worth.
That we have here such writers it is not hard to be-
lieve, especially after one considers the type of
writing that the various campus publications some-
times contain.
The cash prizes have been increased, so that the
remunerative end seems to be well taken care of.
This alone should be sufficient inducement to take
.part in the competition. Prospective writers, how-
ever, should keep in mind above all else that it is
quality and not quantity that is wanted, and it is on
this basis alone that the winning scenarios will be
chosen. The rules have been posted, the judges are
on the qui vive, and the race is on again.

A BOOST FOR MICHIGAN
Scholastic standings of students at the Univer-
sity are the highest they have been for several
years, according to recent reports from the regis-
trar's office. Of the 4,600 students enrolled'in the
Literary college, only So were warned and 22 placed
on probation at mid-semester, whereas a year ago
warnings were sent to 150 and 100 were put on pro-
bation. Authorities attribute the decline in the num-
ber of probationers to the facts that high school
principals are using better judgment in recommend-
ing students for admittance to the University and
that scholarship is improving.
Indications are that we are witnessing a return
to normal standards following the chaotic period,
which lasted throughout the war and shortly after-
wards and during which instruction was carried on
under difficulties. Many students then were ad-
mitted to the University without adequate prepara-
tion, and studies were too often neglected because*
of the fervor of the time. Last year, the scholastic
standard was somewhat elevated, and a lesson
,seems to have been learned as a result of the gradual
weeding-out process which took place at the end of
the first semester. At any rate, as the authorities in-
dicate, a return to some degree of normality has im-
pelled the high school principals to use more dis-
crimination in recommending students for admis-
sion. Likewise, sophomores and upperclassmen,
realizing that more is being expected ofathem, have
responded in such a manner as to aid in raising the
character of their work in general to pre-war stand-
ards.

Michigan is now one of the largest universities in
the country in point of enrollment. If we have be-
come big merely at the expenese of our scholastic
standing then our growth has been in vain. But, on
the other hand, if we can maintain our present size
and a high degree of scholarship in addition, then
Michigan is truly great.;
RULES IS RULES
Recently it has been decided that flowers shall be
banned from the Junior Hop. Some action ought
now to be taken with a view to seeing that the reg-
ulation is enforced.
In the past; similar edicts have been set up, only
to be openly disregarded by a great many of those
who attend the affair. This causes embarrassment
on the part of faithful upholders of the rulings, and
brings disfavor upon the officials in chargz.
If flowers are to be permitted at the Hop, well
and good. But, if they are not, then none at all
should be allowed on the floor. Making provision
for the checking of corsages or placing men at the
door to see that flowers are omitted from the array
of personal adornment, might possibly eliminate
some embarrassment and difficulty on the part of
those in charge.
HEAR YE-ALL WHO SCOFF
Ladies and Gentlemen: Ye who have looked
down from your pedestal of sobriety and rational-
ism, and have judged the present generation of
Michigan students, only to term the men "fussers"
and the women "flappers"; ye who have accused
the Michigan man of not only dancing upon the
ball room floor, but also of kicking in his sleep, and
tripping lightly to classes in the dim haze of dawn,
beset, not with the knowledge instilled by midnight
oil, but by the thoughts of another date as satisfac-
tory as that of the night before; ye who have
charged Michigan women with deliberately expos-
ing themselves to pneumonia for the sake of attrac-
tion, and with laying their bobbed heads, the night
preceding an examination, on a pillow beneath
which lies the picture of a "fusser" in*stead of the
traditional set of text books ; ye who have made all
these accusations, harken unto us that we may es-
tablish Michigan's classic restraint and extreme con-
servatism in comparison to those of other univer-
sities.
It is reported that the special trains leaving the
University of Illinois, just previous to Christmas
vacation, bore, in addition to their passenger
'coaches, baggage cars rigged up as dance halls.
Precious bit of gossip! Imagine the ecstacy of exe-
cuting Terpsichorean figures-of-eight as one is
whirled through space ! Picture the side-stepping
as a sharp curve is taken, the long running slide
as the locomotive comes to a sudden stop, and best
of all the delectable shimmying possible during the
hitching on of a new car ! Such delights are not to
be found in the realm of stationery ball rooms.
Ladies and Gentlemen: Michigan was beginning
to believe your accusations, and the bitter blows of
your tirade of self-abuse were finding a mark in
our midst. But now we doff our hats to our sister
university, and humbly take our seats among the
staid and. steady reactionaries where it is evident
that we belong.
21/ic Teleseope
An Angel
We knew a frosh
Who always did
What he was- told
And never broke
A rule of any sort
And got A's
In all his studies
Wrote home to mother
Every day and
Didn't pad
His expense account
But he was too good
For this world
He up and died.
-D'ing.

Today's Award
A copy of the exam schedules is donated to the
grass-gre n yearling who went to Barbour gym for
a shave and haircut.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Here lies Frank Cockney,
He's gone to Blighty;
He was an air pilot,
But got too flighty.
-- Erman.
Lookie Hvere
From Sheboygan comes this precious bit of
news: "Dan Mosser's heifer calf 'Edla' that was
born on Red Cross Sunday is on the road to re-
covery. Dan was very much afraid he was going
to lose her last Monday for in some mysterious
way she got hold of a rag and chewed more than
was good for her causing her to bloat to twice her
normal size. The stomach pump was used and
'all is well that ends well.'"'
Stolen Thunder
(Why Is It?)
"The guy that's always kicking,
'Bout what other folks should do,
Is the one that's always missing,
When his turn to do is due."
-Ex.
Famous Closing Lines
"What's coming off here?" exclaimed the Blue
Law Buddie as he breathlessly watched the dance
of the seven vails. . RM,

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)nery

l AHAM9S
Is of Diagonal Walk

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars -- 6:oo
a. M., 7:oo a. im., 8:oo a. in., 9:0o a. in. and
hourly to 9:05 p. mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 a. in. and every two hours to
9:47 P. im.
Local Cars East Found-5:s5 a.m., 7:0o a.
in. and every two hours to 9:0o p. in., £1.oo
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-x1.:40 p. in., 12:25
a. in., 1 : r5sa.i.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars west Bound-7:5s a. m., 2:4+
p. in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a. in., 12:47 -2.47, 4:47.
To Jackson and Lansing - Limited : 8:4i
P. i.

1922
S
1
8
15
22
29

JANUARY
M T W T
2 3 4 5
9 10 11 12
16 17 18 19
23 24 25 28
80 81

F
6
13
20
27

1922
S
7
14
21
28

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617 PACKARD STREET
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Jan. 15, 16, 17, 18
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