100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 13, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND SNOW FLUR-
RIES TODAY

LY

i Ar A

ti

VC

1

DAY AND NIGHT W
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 79 ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1922 PRICE FIVE

....

SEWBERRY'S RIGHT
TO SEAT GRANTED
BY SENA'[ UTET
SUPPORTERS OF SENATOR SE-
CURE SUCCESSVUL BALLOT
46.41
RESOLUTION PASSED TO
CONDE% N XPENDITURE
Commodore States Action Vindleates
Rim in Statement to
Public
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 12.--Truman H.
Newberry was declared by the senate
today to be entitled to the ,seat which
he now holds and which was made the
basis of a contest by Henry Ford,
his Democratic opponent in the 1918
Michigan senatorial election. The vote
was 46 to 41.

Pass Resolution
The senate acted on a resolution spon-
sored by Republican leaders asserting
that Mr. Newberry was entitled to his
seat, but amended in .last minute
conferences so as to condemn excess
expenditures in senatorial campaigns.
All of Senator Newberry's support-
ers were Republicans. The Demo-
cratic membership was joined by nine
Republicans in opposition. These
were: Borah, Capper, Jones of Wash-
ington, Kenyon, Ladd, La Follette,
Nordeck, Norris and Sutherland.
- Newberry's Statement
' Senator Newberry, in the following
statement, hailed the senate's action
as a vindication:

"My heart is filled with thankful-
ness after three years and four
months of persecution have ended in
complete vindication and exoneration
of yself and all concerned."
e senate's final vote came upon
the resolution, amended by Senator
Spenser, Republican, Missouri, to de-
clare Mr. Newberry entitled to his seat
after substituting the Willis amend-
ment for the original clause which de-
clared the charges against Mr. New-
berry were not sustained.
Organ 's Serious
Tones Unbroken
During Recital
(By Sidney B. CoatesQ.
Massiveness and seriousness char-
acterized yesterday's organ recital by
Earl V. Moore on the Hill auditorium
organ. Only one number, Parker's
Allegretto in B flat minor, seemed to
break the spell of the program's con-
sistent gravity, and even this num-
ber, with its minor harmonies, seemed
not to depart from the spirit of the
whole.
Mr. Moore's most effective work
was in the tone poem, "Finlandia,"
by Sibelius ,which portrayed the strug-
gles, sorrows and victories of the Fin-
nish people. The organist's interpre-
tation was admirable, bringing out the
spirit of the weird music. The com-
position reacted strangely, for there
was portrayed conflict that was not
quite our conception of conflict, sor-
rowthat wasinot quite sorrow, and
victory not quite victory; but the
Finns are a strange people.
Parker's "Risoluto," which opened
the recital, was a work compact in its
harmonies, with semi-religious eeffets.
Its message semed somewnat obscure.
The other two works, the slumber
song of Parker and the Mendelssohn
selection, called forth the pleasant
quiet which &vr. Moore can give to
such seiections.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC GRADUATE
TO GIVE CON VE RT TONIGHT,
Offering a program of variety and
containing selections from a wide se-
lection of composers, Mrs. Emma Fis-
cher-Cross, formerly of Ann Arbor and
teacher in the School of Music, will
give a piano and organ concert at 8
o'clock tonight in the Ann Arbor Beth-
lehem church. Mrs. Annis Dexter
Gray, contralto, of the Ypsilanti Nor-
mal conservatory will assist.
Camp Davis Men Plan Dance
A dance under the auspices of the
Camp Davis men, those who attended
the surveying camp on Douglas lake,
will be given in Barbour gymnasium
from 9 to 1 o'clock tonight.- '
To add local color to the function,
Camp Davis dress will prevail and
during the program of dances there
will be a camp sing. A few tickets re-
main which may be secured for $1.50
per couple at the door,

Crew Prospects
Alumnus Subject
"Are We to Have a Crew?" the title
of an interesting article discussing
the prospects for a Varisity rowing
team at Michigan, is the' chief article
in this week's number of the Michi-
gan Alumnus.
A story about Srinvassa Sastri, In-
dia's delegate to the Washington Arms
conference, and his recent lecture
here, points out that the Hindu's mes-
sage was of singular interest, be-
cause of the fact that Prof. C. H. Van-
Tyne, of the history department, is en-
gaged at the present time at Delhi,
India, in studying the new-represen-
tative government of that country.
Other articles that should prove of
interest to readers of the Alumnus
are "The Union Opera in Tour," "The
Building Program Under Way," and
the second installment of "Michigan's
Literary Lights."
MOVIE PROUCTION
AWITSSCENARIO0
President of Film Company Expresses
Disappointment in Quality
of Plots
SAME RULES APPLY, FIRST
PRIZE INCREASED TO $75
No action will be taken toward
completing the University movie un-
til scenarios of sufficient originality
and dramatic value are obtained, the
committee in charge of examining
them declared yesterday. The decision
that the scenario contest would need
to be reopened for three weeks was
announced yesterday and resulted
from the confirmation of the commit-
tee's opinion given by the president
of the producing company, who was1
in Ann Arbor for the day Wednesday.
"I am greatly disappointed in the
quality of plots turned in by Michigan
students," he said before returning to
the company's studios Wednesday.
"The University has been noted for
many years for the men it has contrib-
uted to literary and dramatic fields,
but the work on the plots submitted
was not remarkable in any way."
National Showing Planned
The committee appointed by Presi-
dent Marion L. Burton, consisting of
Prof. Louis A. Strauss, of the English
department, and Dr. Frank A. Rob-
bins, assistant to the President, was
much pleased at the attitude the pro-
ducing company took, since it was
felt that a film.representing the Uni-
versity should be of the highest possi-
ble quality. The completed picture
will be given a statewide and national
showing and, being the first that has
ever been attempted by an American
university, will n large part stand for
the college life of the nation.
"We plan on bringing to the Uni-
versity a highly trained staff, capable
of producing a high-grade picture,"
said the representativemoftthe pro-
ducers, -but even the most efficient
technical staff cannot put out a good
film if provided with a second class
scenario. We will not start until we
are assured that the dramatic worth
of our subject will give us satisfac-
tory material."
Prize Increased
The rules for the contest remain
substantially the same as for the first
competition under the auspices of The
Daily. The first prize has been in-
creased from $50 to $75, with the sec-
ond prize the same, $25. The remain-
ing rules are printed below.
1. The contest is open to all persons
connected with the University save
those working on the business or edi-
torial staffs of The Daily.
2. All manuscripts must be type-
written on white 8 1-2x11 inch paper.
Original copies, not carbons, must be
submitted.

3. Manuscripts should average 1,500
words.
4. The writer's name and address
must be on the upper left hand cor-
ner of the first page of the manu-
script. In the opposite corner must be
typed, "Submitted according to the
rules of the contest."
5. All manuscripts become the prop-
erty of The Michigan Daily. Those
not accepted will be returned only if
self-addressed and stamped envelopes
are enclosed.
6'. Manuscripts will be judged by
competent judges picked by The Mich-
igan {Daily and the producers.
7. Manuscripts should be addressed
to "Scenario Editor," Care of Michigan
Daily.
Fresh tits Dance at Union Tomorrow
Freshman lits will have an after-
noon dance at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow
at the Union. Mike Chon's orchestra
will play. Tic. may be obtained
at the Union or a campus from
members of the clas ' ass dues may
be paid 'at the door.

One curious fact about the psychol- on the field and gym floor during
ogy of tue wants-to-be atniece is that meets, and the result has been that II-
ut is apt, nine times out of ten, to linois, with her numbers, has won the
reirain irom presencang himser for meets, whereas Michigan has lost out,
'raruing because he ieeis teall he simply because she has been unable
w'ands no cance when men of abii- to pile up a large number of small
,iy ana much sport-page fame are scores. Michigan has had quality, but
<aso in the race. As a matter of fact, Illinois has beat us out with quantity.
..±e basis of ns reasoning is all wrong. At the present time, less than 90
iue 'star". is not aiways the iuan athletes are working out for the Var-
vvno wins meets. It is the man who sity in Waterman gymnasium. Mich-
uoiues in second or third or fourth, igan needs quantity this year as
wno stacks up a point here and two well as Illinois. And she neds the lit-
points there, that helps to win. tie fellow, the big fellow, the bow-
The truth of this near-paradox has legged waddler and the man who can
oeen brought to light many times in straddle a fence with both feet on the
the past. For the last two years, ground. A track team comprises en-
Illinois has won the intercollegiate tries for twelve events, and almost no
track championship, simply because kind of human architecture can be
the had men, lots of men, whose abil- found which is not suited to some
qty ranged all the way from "A plus" branch of track work.
to "C minus" grade. Intercollegiates Right now is the time for track men
are now run on the fivq-point basis, to present themselves to the trainer,
credit being given for men taking and for friends of athletes to begin a
fourth and fifth place in any event, recruiting campaign. And if Michigan
as well as for those ranking in first, gets the kind of a representation she
second or third. Illinois has always ought to hive, the old-timers on the
placed an incredible number of men squad had better look to their laurels.

-_

Wanted -- Point-Winners

TEAM CAPINS PREPAR
TO CARRY SICADRIVE
THROUGH SUCCESSFULLY
CAMPAIGN FOR $4,000 WILL BE
READY FOR START ON
TUESDAY
Preparations to make the Student
Christian association drive for $4,000,
one of the most successful campaigns'
ever attempted on the campus are
now well under way.
At the meeting of team captains yes-
terday afternoon in Lane hall many of
the organization details were attend-
ed to so that the drive will open first
Ching Tuesday morning.
Will Solicit Campus
Every man on the campus will bei
asked to contribute his share of the1
budget. The city has been divided into
districts so that a complete canvass1
will be made. Each solicitor will visit+
15 or 20 men.
The team obtaining the largest1
amount of money will be given a ban-
quet and the individual who raisesI
the most money will receive a cup or1
some other similar form of recogni-]
tion.
As was announced in yesterday's
Daily, several items of the budget will
be published each day telling howI
much money is needed and just what
it is being used for.
Used in Extension Service
Three hundred dollars are needed
for the extension service. Studenta
speakers are sent to the high schools,,
churches, athletic banquets, and fath-
er-and-son banquets in other cities
and towns for the purpose of urging
high school students to secure a high-
er education and to tell them of the
work being done here in the Uhiver-
sity. Last year 136 speakers were
sent out who spoke to more than 15,000
.people. The committee expects to
double the work this year.
The service is now branching out,1
with the aid of Alumni associations,
so that it not only takes in the towns
in Michigan but also Chicago, Toledo,+
Cleveland, and Buffalo. In this way
the University is placed before the
people of Michigan and surrounding+
states.
Fifty dollars are needed for litera-
ture and supplies. This pays for part
of the literature sent out by the S.
C. A.
GALENS INITIATES
AT UNION TONIGHT
Galens, honorary upperclass med-
ical society, will hold their annual
initiation banquet at 6 o'clock tonight
in the Michigan Union.
Junior medical tsudents to be taken
into the society are: John H. Labadle,
Stewart E. Doolittle, W. W. Babcock,
James W. Halfhill, Werner W. Deulm-
ing, Hudson W. Fleischauer, Herbert
G. Kleekamp, James E. Croushore,
Royes R. Shafter, Donald R. Wright,
Robert F. Heatley, and L. Coleman
Ludlum. Doctors Carl D. Camp, Al-
bert M. Barrett, LeRoy C. Abbott, and
Roland S. Cron, of the Medical school,
are.to be initiated into honorary mem-
bership,

FINE CHAMBER music
INCLUDEDONPMG6RM
Of MATINEE CONCERT
COMBINATION OF PIANO, VIOLIN,
AND CELLO WELL
WORKED OUT
An interesting program of chamber
music was presented yesterday after-
noopi before a good sized audience in
the Union assembly hall, by Ethel
Litchfield, pianist, Henri Czaplinski,
violinist, and Boris Hambourg, 'cell-
ist, Inrthe Matinee Musicale sores of
concerts.
The program consisted of three num-
bers, the last of whch, a Trio, Opus
6, by Rachmaninoff, was decidedly the
best. The number calls for a varied
style of expression and brought out
the best interpretative work of the aft-
ernoon.
The other number in which all
three artists took part, the Trio in D
major, Opus 70, No. 1, by Beethoven,
reached near perfection in spots but
the work as a whole seemed to lack
polish.
In the second number on the pro-
gram, a 'Cello and Piano Sonata Opus
40, by Boellmann, Mr. Hambourg did
his best work. The allegro molto
movement had a character about it
and showed a mature musicianship
which made it stand out as the best
of the three movements.
Miss Ltchfield was the outstanding
member of the organization and her
work dominated all the numbers. A
fine technique and excellent sense of
rhythym gave character to everything
she played. Mr. Czaplinski shows
promise of being a very fine artist
and in one or two of his solos drew a
remarkably fine tone. /
Seltzer Speaks to Prescott Club
L. A. Seltzer, '92P, formerly a mem-
ber of the state board of pharmacy
and at present proprietor of Detroit's
largest pharmacy, spoke on "Practi-
cal Pharmacy and Prescription Fill-
ing" before the Prescott club in room
303, Chemistry building, at 7:30
o'clock last night. In his conclusion
Mr. Seltzer urged the members of the
club to have a vision of the purpose
they wish to accomplish, to lay their
plans and execute them, and above
all to exercise- common, sense.
Supreme Council Adjourns
Cannes, Jan. 12.-The allied su-
preme council adjourned indefinitely
tonight after receipt of news of the
resignation of the Briand cabinet. Ad-
journment was taken after Walter
Rathenal, chairman, financial expert
had finished addressing the council,
and no action of comment was made
upon his remark concerning Ger-
many's default of her January repara-
tions payment.
Delegates Work on Shantung Problem
Washington, Jan. 12.-Further de-
tails of both the naval treaty and the
Shantung negotiations were ironed
out today, but the arms delegates gave
up hope of a plenary session this
week to announce defnite results,

Soph Lits Plan
Smoker fIonday
Short, snappy talks and peppy and
entertaining music are promised as
attractions at the soph lit smoker
which is to be held Monday evening
in the upper reading room of the
Union. Dean John R. Effinger, of the'
literary college, and Prof. W. D. Hen-7
derson, of the University extension
service, will speak for the faculty,
while the student body will be repre-
sented in Donald Steketee, '24, and
Owen Watts, '22L.
Music for the occasion will be furn-
ished by the "String Quintette" and
by a six-piece orchestra of which Lee
L. Niedzielski, '24, is the leader.'
There will be several piano selctions
by C. Kratz, Jr., '24E.
Tickets for the smoker are priced
at 50 cents and will be on sale at both
ends of the Diagonal Monday morn-1
ing.
UNION OPERA WILL
GIVE 1-OP NSO
Seat Sale for "Make It For Two" to
Open to Students on
Feb. 11
CHANGE MUSICAL NUMBERS;
DANCES TO IMPROVE PLAY
"Make It For Two," the 1922 Union
opera will give a J-Hop performance,
it was announced yesterday by of-
ficils. The production has been book-
ed for Saturday afternoon, Feb. 11, at
the Whitney theater.
Given for Visitors
In order that people from outside
the city who have not seen the opera
could attend this year's show, and to
furnish an attraction for the Hop
week end, the show was scheduled.
A number of organizations 'have al-
ready signified their intention of at-
tending the performance in a body,
as they ha.e piaced the opera on
their Hop calendar of social events.
The seat sale will open Feb. 6 at
the Union to members of the Union.
In order to avoid congestion, number-
ed slips will be handed to applicants
for tickets, and the tickets will be
mailed out soon after in that order.
Prices will bete the 'same as prevailed
during the December week perform-
ances and on the road, $2.50, $2, and
Make Changes
Minor changes were made in the
show during the road tour, strengthen-
ing the production, it was said by
those who saw the show here and on
the road. Several musical numbers
were somewhat changed, and a few of
the dances. A song, which proved a
hit on the tour, "Michigan Memories,"
sung by Kemp Keena, director of the'
orchestra, was not heard in Ann Ar-
bor as it was written only a short time
before the trip was begun.
OTTAWY SECURED FOR
UNION ADDES SOSNDAY

TRACK MEET HER
MICHIGAN IS LOGICAL CHOIC
FOR EVENT IF HELD
IN WEST
YOST SAYS NO ACTION
HAS YET BEEN TAKE
Ferry Field Has All Facilities
Area, Stands, and Clubhouse
for Meet
Acceptance of an invitation fro
the University of Michigan by the I
ter-collegiate Association of Amate
Athletes of America to hold its annu
track and field meet at Ann Arbor
May of this year or in 1923 'won
mean that the affair would be stag
in the West for the first time. TI
the issuance of such an invitation
under advisement bytheaMichi
Athletic association was admitted1
Coach Yost who denied, however, tb
any action had been taken on I
matter.
U. of M. Choice of West
If the association should consider I
staging of the meet in any section
the country beside the East, Michig
would be the logical choice. Until C
ifornia won the intercollegiates l
spring, Michigan had led all westi
institutions in records at the t
meet. Eleven times the Wolverin
have sent teams, and although ne'
finishing first, they were usually wi
up in the standing. Ralph Craig
Michigan is a joint holder of the 2
yard dash record of 21 1-5 secon
which until recently was the work
record. Carl Johnson, the track wo
der of a year -ago, is the second
dividual high scorer in any int
collegiate meet. In 1919 at Boston,
was first in the broad jump, took s
ond in the 100 yard dash, and tied
second in the high jump. His tot
number of points was 12 1-2, alm
one-half of his team's total for t
year.

JOURNALISM AS A PROFESSION
FOR COLLEGE MEN TO BE
DISCUSSED
"Breaking Into the News Game,"
will be the subject to be informally
discussed by E. J. Ottaway, '94, editor
of the Port Huron Times-Herald, at
the afternoon meeting Sunday in the
Union. His address is the third of the
series of Sunday afternoon meetings
which the Union is holding to familiar.
ize men with various businesses and
professions.
As editor of one of the state's dail-
ies, and president of the University
Press club, Mr. Ottaway is well known
h~ere and throughout the state. He is
much interested In college journalism,
and worked .to have a department of
journalism started in the University.
This is the first time this year that
the Sunday afternoon meetings have'
taken up the subject of newspaper
work. Mr. Ottaway plans to make the
address such that it will be interest-
ing to everyone, not merely those who
plan to enter the field of jounralism.
He will describe the problems of the
daily newspaper office, and what is ex-
pected of college men when they take
positions in that field.
PLAYERS CLUB TO PRESENT
TWO PLAYS NEXT THURSDAY
Members of the Players club will
present two plays, "The Wonder Hat"
and "Neighbors," on Thursday night,
Jan. 19, in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
"The Wonder Hat" will be produced
under the supervision of Miss L. Os-
borne, of the high school, while the
other play will be directed by R. S.
Tubbs, '34L.

Records Since 1907
Michigan's record at the eastern
ter-collegiates since 1907 is: 190
Michigan second, 29 points; 190
Michigan tied for sixth, 6 poir
1909-Michigan fifth, 14 points; 19
Michigan third, 20 points; 1911-M
igan third, 24 points; 1912-MiceI
third, 15 points; 1913-Michlj
third, 19 points; 1914 - Michi
third, 29 1-2 points; 1915-Michi
sixth, 14 points; 1916-Michigan si
13 points; 1917 and 1918-No er
during war; 1919-Michigan third
1-2; 1920 and 1921-No entry.
It is not yet decided whether MI
gan will participate in the East
year. An open date has been left
the schedule so that she can ente
she sees fit.
Ferry Field Is Adequate
Ferry field is declared adequate
the staging of the large track
field meet which the I. C. A. A. A
holds every year. In 1920, the 'W
ern Conference track and field i
was held on the field. Every fac
for the proper conduct of the r
was found. The Michigan cin
track, which is one of the best
fastest in the country, has a 220 y
straightaway for the dashes and b
dles, 'and a quarter mile track v
only one turn. Sixlanes can be n
in the track.
The javelin throw, pole vault, h
jump, and broad jump are run o
the area inside the track. In the
this is used for the football fi
Close unobstructed views of all
events are afforded from the sta
which will seat approximately 40
At the west end of the field, reason
close to the stands, but yet -dis
enough to afford complete safety,
the rings for the weight events,
shot put, hammer, and discus.
Facing the athletic field is the (
house, the most complete this sid
he Alleghenies. excellent accon
ations for visiting athletes are
forded here. It is thought that
the athletes attending the.meet c
be cared for within it.
Alpha Nu Elects Tonight
Members and pledges of Alpha
will hold a meeting at 7:30 0o'
tonight for the election of officers
discussion of business matters
taining to the organization..

i
I
I
I
I
I
I

INTERFRATERNITY NOT]
The interfraternity confer
will meet at 7:30 o'clock to:
row at the Union.
KENNETH McCOLL, '23
Presi

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan