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January 12, 1922 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY,

s

Ullit £irIti* n Dat
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published 'every morning except Monday durin'tho Waiver.
sity year by the Beard in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Pre.. is exclusively entitled to thee.se for
republication of all news datches credted to it or not oterwise
credited in thi20ape and t local news published therein.
,Zutered at the postoffloo at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as saoe
class smatter.
Suncription by carrier or mail, 0.50y.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building. Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96.; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig
nature not necessarily to appear in print but as an evidenceof
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The. Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications. ,
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor... .........Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor.............................. E. P. Lovejoy. Jr.
Night Editors-
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
John P. Dawson M. B. Stan:
JMward ,amore cht Paul Watrel
Wditorial Board Chairman,.................It. > Armstrong Kern
Assistants-
L eo Hershdorfer E. R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
exchange Editor.................................George E. Sloan
Music Editor..................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor ................................George Reindel
Women's Editor...........................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor .........................R R. Meiss

Assistants
Kingsley S. Andersson L. L. Fenwick
Maurice Berman Dorothy G. Geltz
Cecil R. Betron H. B. Grundy
Jack D. Briscoe Sadyebeth Heath
. B.Butler Winona A. Hibbard
R. N. Byera Harry D. Hoey
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmqust
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett
J. P. Comstock Maion Kerr
Robert W.Cooper L. S. Kerr
Evelyn J. Coughin M. A. Klaver
John P. Dawson Victor W. Klein
H. A. Donahue Marion Koch
W. F. Elliott George E. Lardner

B. H. Lee
Robert M. Loeb
J. E. Mack
Kathrine Montgomery
R. C. Moriarty
I P. Pontius
illian Scher
R. B. Tarr
Virginia Tryon
Dorothy Whipple
L. L. Yost
J. B. Young

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER.............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising .......... ....... ..P. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ............................ Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ............................... John J. Hamels Jr.
Circulation..............................- Hereld C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heldbreder
W. Cooler James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
I.Beumot Parks Maurice Mole J A. Dryer
Walter Scherer s ai tn Goldring Rchardeman
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T.IH.Wolfe
r David Park Paul Bu
-- THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1922
Night Edtor-EDW. F. LAMBRECH
Assistant-M. A. Klaver
Proofreaders-J. D. Briscoe
J. F. Pontius
The Reporters' club will meet at 4:30 o'clock this
afternoon.
BASKETBALL UNDER WAY
"Michigan came back with a bang tonight and
defeated Chicago," began an article appearing in
yesterday morning's Detroit Free Press. The sound
of that is like music to the cars of a Michigander.
We began the 1921 season with a loss of several
games, but later came back with a vengeance,
jumped from the bottom to the top, and tied two
other Conference teams for first-place honors. This
year, though we lost at the start to Ohio State, we
have begun really under more auspicious circum-
stances, in that we took Chicago, the winners over
O. S. U., under our wing Tuesday night.
Michigan has begun well, and should keep up the
standard, if nothing serious occurs to set back her
plans and hopes. Nevertheless, let both players and
campus realize that we have many hard games
ahead, and act accordingly.
GUNS, BUT NO BULLETS
We may brag and boast to the limit of our breath,
we may wave our arms before the tent and howl
to the edge of exhaustion of the excellence of the
show inside; in short, we may herald Michigan to
the skies. But, if we do all this without furnishing
the action necessary to hold her on the top rung,
we may dub ourselves mere hypocrites and thank
our lucky stars that her fame has stood the test as
long as it has.
For it seems that we of the campus require eter-
nal prodding if we are to get up energy enough for
action. This is shown in no clearer way than
through the disgracefully small turn-out for track
this year. To date, Coach "Steve" Farrell has ap-
proximately ninety men on his list of candidates.
Steve Farrell is more than a good coach: he is
a truly exceptional coach. Given a man of any abil-
ity whatsoever, Steve will make a trackster out of
him if he has any enthusiasm and stick-to-itiveness
in his make-up. Time and again has the coach
taken over apparently mediocre material and turned
out unusual athletes ; time and again has he discov-
ered the "makings" in a man who appeared to be
just "playing 'round" in the gymnasium, and has
worked wonders, with him.
Nevertheless, Steve Farrell is not a superhuman.
He can make runners and hurdlers and shotputters
and pole vaulters from the material given him, if
that material is capable of being molded, but he
certainly cannot develop a team without something
to work on. Michigan may give Coach Farrell three
hundred men, and he will turn out a track squad
that can hold the world at bay. On the other hand,
Michigan may give the coach only eighty or one
hundred average men, and neither he nor the gods
from Olympus could manufacture anything worth
real Conference or national recognition, without the
assistance of a miracle.
A turn-out of ninety men for track is nothing
dhvet nf ridiculous for a student body tha aof

our own. We are trying to shoot without being
properly equipped with ammunition. From an ath
lete's viewpoint ,of course, the coach probably gets
too much credit for the work of a winning team -
some large share of it, no doubt, should go to the
men themselves. But, be this as it may, if ath-
letes or would-be athletes fail to present themselves
for practice, and if friends of athletes fail to get be-
hind hesitant material and push, then certainly none
of the delinquents deserve much credit, and the
coach needs a great amount of sympathy.
ONE MAN JUDGMENTS
Some real satisfaction may be derived from the
knowledge that the no-decision system employed in
the Mid-West Debating league last year is to be
abandoned. A judgment is to be rendered this spring
as it used to be in years past-the real spirit of con-
test is to be re-injected into public debates. Now,
however, following the plan of Wisconsin, one judge
will take the place of the board of three which for-
merly <gave the verdict. In his hands alone will lie
the decisive power.
This new plan is the outcome of the differing
ideas of the three schools in the league. Illinois
wanted to use the no-decision system; Wisconsin
wanted only one judge; and Michigan wanted
three. The one-judge suggestion was adopted as
a sort of compromise, agreeable to all three.
Wisconsin's contention is that one well-qualified
judge can do the work of three, and that no danger
of partiality is met with if some person not con-
nected with any of the three universities is se-
lected. This is true as far as it goes, but it does
not go far enough to include the personal equation.
One judge is apt unconsciously to allow his per-
sonal prejudices to influence his judgment. When
each of three persons have a voice in the final out-
come of a debate, their natural prejudices probably
will be varied enough to offset one another. One
judge may be the product of a certain school with
well-defined notions of what is right and wrong in
debating, whereas three generally have differing
opinions regarding good and bad qualities, and the
ideas of all will work together to effect a final and
sensible balance.
The one-judge plan will do one thing: it will cut
down expenses - and possibly, while the league is
in the business of experimenting, one little venture
more or less will not matter in the long run. But,
on the whole, the three-man system appears far
more logical to us than any scheme which would
limit the size of the board of judges, and would put
the final decisive power in the hands of one, lone
man.
Prof. David Friday, it is reported, has begged a
further extension of time from the state, and will
not take up his new position as president of M. A.
C. until April z. We wonder - is he trying to play
a joke on the Aggies?
fie Telescope
Our Sand Beach
(With due apologies)
Despite all my efforts, my memory will harbor
The thought of the sand beach way back in Ann
Arbor;
Aye, place of a myriad of once-weekly scrubs,
Each left its mark, oh most venerable of tubs.
Oh ,our old two-inch sand beach,
Our old bath tub sand beach,
Once thou wast lined with snow white sand I trow,
But past is thy glory -
'Tis now but a story -
For all of thy once light sand's stratified now !
- Vee Dee.
Economics MCMXXII
We always did wonder how the Ingersoll Watch
company could market their product at so reason-
able a price.
We understand that their financial plan was to
sell each watch at a slight loss, but to sell so many
watches that this would be counteracted.
It was a great surprise to us to hear recently that
the Ingersoll company, working on such a firm eco-

nomic basis, had failed.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Here lies the last of Elmer Kave
Who thought of golf while trying to shave,
Thus while enticed
The poor boy sliced
And now he lies deep in his grave.
- Max Nodiffunce.
Reads Like a Boxing Match
They came from opposite directions around the
corner and nearly collided. Simultaneously each
tried to get out of the -other's way and took a step
to one side.
Still they faced each other. Each stepped to the
other side. No use.
"jWell," she said coldly, "which is it to be ,a one-
step or a fot-trot?" -Benedicte.
With Apologies to K-K-K-Katy
(Bostonese version?)
Katherine, pulchritudinous Katherine,
You are the only maiden upon this mundane sphere
To whom I would pledge my affections.
And when Luna casts her translucent beams
Upon the shelter which has been provided
For the family bovine,
I shall await you at the rear entrance
Of your domicile. - Lil O' the Hill.
Famous Closing Lines
"Gosh, all hemlock," quoth Socrates as he quaffed
the fatal cup, ERM.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oo
a. M., 7:oo a. in., 8:oo a. xn., 9:oo a. in. and
hourly to 9:o5 p. im.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 P. in.
Local Cars East Bound-5: 5 a.in. 7:oo a.
mn. and every two hours to 9:oo p. in., z1.00
p. in. To Ypsilanti only-:: :4o p. in., 1z:25
a. mn., r : r5 a. im.
To Saline,achange at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars west Bound-7 :g. a. am., 2:44
p. mi.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10 :47, 8a. in., 12:47, 2.47,P4:47.
To Jackson and Lansing - Limited: 8:47
p. m.
1922 JANUARY 1922
1 $ 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
16 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 26 26 27 28
29 80 81
NOTICE TO HEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
Inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
WINTER TERM
Shorthand Typewriting
Penmanship
Accounting Secretarial
HAMILTON BUSINESS COL.
State and William f
SLEEP ANYWHERE, BUT
EAT AT REX'S
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 Arbor Street
Near State and Packard Streets
A Reliable jeweler
CH APMAN
1 13 South Moir

SWAIN

Amateur Finishing

Lantern Slides

GROUPS
Daylight or Flashlight
Indoors or Outside

713 E. University Ave.

REDUCTIONS ONI
r -
r -
r 0
r 0
Boh ns tDigna al

I

i

I

A

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Buy your class toques from Daily Read Michigan Daily Ads and you
advertisers.-Adv. will buy wisely.-Adv.

'4

IA

j

OUR MOTTO "QUALITY GROCERIES AT SMALL PROFIT"
1215-17 PROSPECT - PHONE 136-M

4

4

a

This is the Place

Where there is always on hand the latest of the best that the
market affords in plain and fancy groceries, vegetables, fruits,

w

canned goods, etc.

I

Our prices are as they always have been, very low, and our
service unsurpassed for promptness and accommodation. Try
us. Let us have your order today.

s,

Fancy Creamery Butter, per lb. .............................. .$42
Eggs, per doz . .................................. .. ...... A4
W hite House Coffee, 44c lb.; 3 lbs. for . . . . . . . . . . .... .......... 1.25
Golden Sun Tea, 40c per %2lb..or per lb..................... .15
Selected Sweet June Peas, 14cper can; 2 for ...................... .25
Grape Fruit, 8c each; 4 for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... ...... . . .25
Oranges, per doz. .......... ...........................35c .45
Fancy Florida Oranges, per doz. ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Bananas, 15c per lb.; 2 lbs. for ........... .................. .25
Bacon by the Strip, per lb................. ............. .22
Pork Chops, per lb. . . . . ..a.a . . . ...aa 25

WE ALSO CARRY OTHER MEATS AT REASONABLE PRICES

Order your ice cream for Sunday dinner

of -----

"T he

White

Palace"

Phone 136M

it

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